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This question already has an answer here:

Reading about DCL in Wikipedia, I was wondering about the problem in DCL and the proposed solution, or in other words why is the volatile keyword needed? The problem, in short: using DCL may result in some cases in a partially constructed object being used by thread. The proposed solution (for JAVA 5+):

// Works with acquire/release semantics for volatile
// Broken under Java 1.4 and earlier semantics for volatile
class Foo {
    private volatile Helper helper;
    public Helper getHelper() {
        Helper result = helper;
        if (result == null) {
            synchronized(this) {
                result = helper;
                if (result == null) {
                    helper = result = new Helper();
                }
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

    // other functions and members...
}

Now, my question is why not drop the volatile from helper? correct me if I'm wrong, but if you just break this line: helper = result = new Helper(); to:

result = new Helper();
helper = result;

In this scenario the helper will never get the reference until the object is complete. Isn't that so? How is the volatile doing better?

EDIT: assume this code:

class Foo {
    private volatile Helper helper;
    public Helper getHelper() {
        Helper result = helper;
        if (result == null) {
            synchronized(this) {
                result = helper;
                if (result == null) {
                    result = new Helper();
                    result.someMethod();
                    helper = result;
                }
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
}

If the next line after initialization doesn't guaranty a fully initialized object, I can't call methods on it. Can I?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Boris the Spider java May 25 '14 at 9:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Because result = new Helper(); helper = result; is exactly the same as helper = result = new Helper();. What did you think would be different? – immibis May 25 '14 at 9:13
4  
Apparently, you assume that all actions will be executed in a total order that is consistent with program order. That's not true for multi-threaded programs in general. – nosid May 25 '14 at 9:17
    
@nosid, I realize that the initialization line may receive the address before initialization is complete, but I was assuming that the next line will only be executed after initialization is complete. Otherwise, how can I even use an object after I instantiate it? I can never now if it is fully initialized? See EDIT. – Yekhezkel Yovel May 25 '14 at 9:23
    
@YekhezkelYovel: The actions within a single thread will always appear to be executed in program order. Regarding multiple threads, the execution will appear to be sequentially consistent, if there are no data races. Your code contains a data race on helper, if the variable isn't volatile. – nosid May 25 '14 at 9:37
    
@YekhezkelYovel: In the second listing, where is the variable helper updated? – nosid May 25 '14 at 9:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you omit volatile, the compiler is free to optimize out result completely. This extra local variable doesn't change that much. It saves an extra load, but it's the volatile keywords which fixes the race condition.

Let's assume we have following fragment of code:

public volatile Object helper;

public synchronized void initHelper() {
    Object result = new Object();
    helper = result;
}

It will be compiled to following pseudo-assembly:

public synchronized void initHelper() {
    Object result = Object.new();
    result.<init>();
    // result is now fully initialized
    // but helper is still null for all threads
    this.helper = result;
    // now all threads can access fully initialized helper
}

If you remove volatile the compiler is allowed to assume no other thread uses helper and rearrange the code to optimize it. It might decide to remove unnecessary local variable and produce following output:

public synchronized void initHelper() {
    this.helper = Object.new();
    // from now on other threads can access helper
    this.helper.<init>();
    // but it's fully initialized only after this line
}

If you add a function call in initHelper. The compiler will never put this call before initialization. That would change the meaning of the program even in single thread. But it's allowed to do optimizations which will break multithreaded code accessing this field.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Banthar. It give a better understanding of volatile even though I'm still a bit confused. See my EDIT please. – Yekhezkel Yovel May 25 '14 at 9:30
    
Thanks @Banthar. What will it look like if I use the volatile keyword but do not use a local variable? – Yekhezkel Yovel May 25 '14 at 10:26
    
The transformation is not correct, because <init> might throw an exception. – nosid May 25 '14 at 10:31
    
In this case it won't change anything. The compiler will add a temporary variable on its own so initialization is done before assignment to field. helper was assigned to only once - compiler is not allowed to change that. – Banthar May 25 '14 at 10:33
    
@nosid you are right. This example is a gross simplification. Maybe I shouldn't call this <init> as this is not really the constructor. – Banthar May 25 '14 at 10:35

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