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An example: I have a set

[a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h]

and I want to choose three of them but without repetition, so

[e, g, a] 

is a correct subset and

[h, c, h]

is incorrect.

Any idea how to make it easily and clearly?

For the sake of clarity: I have a set of questions for a quiz. It's not about generate a subset of letters. What I want to have: Either a subset of String array or a subset of indexes of array e.g. from 0 to 10. Because it is for a quiz the elements can not be repeated.

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What have tried? –  Braj May 25 at 11:47
    
Normally a set does not include duplicates. Do you need them? Otherwise you could use HashSet and you wouldn't have them. –  alexvii May 25 at 11:48
    
Nothing so far. Only way I can do this is by making my own function and e.g. making a subset by deleting unwanted elements. But it will work only once. Because I don't have better ideas I thought it would be good to ask. –  user3616181 May 25 at 11:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try with Collections.shuffle() on List and get the first three values if there is no concern of extra memory uses.

Set<Character> set = new TreeSet<Character>();
for (char c = 'a'; c < 'i'; c++) {
    set.add(c);
}

List<Character> list = new ArrayList<Character>(set);
Collections.shuffle(list);
System.out.println(list.subList(0, 3));

You can try this one as well

Random random = new Random();
int index = 0;

List<Character> list = new ArrayList<Character>(set);
Set<Character> newSet = new HashSet<Character>();
while (newSet.size() < 3) {
    index = random.nextInt(set.size());
    newSet.add(list.get(index));
}
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shuffle() has a O(n) complexity (n being the size of the set) –  rds May 25 at 11:56
    
Yes you are right. –  Braj May 25 at 11:58
    
It looks good. Numer of elements will not be large, so O(n) is satisfactory. –  user3616181 May 25 at 12:01

If O(n) is ok for you, you can iterate through the items. For each item, you randomly select it or not.

Set<Character> newSet = ...;

for (Char elem : set) {
   if (randomFunction()) {
      newSet.add(elem);
   }
}
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Would it avoid duplicates? –  user3616181 May 25 at 11:54
1  
The set datatype never contains duplicates so not the origin nor the destination will have duplicates. EDIT: From the javadocs [A set is] A collection that contains no duplicate elements. More formally, sets contain no pair of elements e1 and e2 such that e1.equals(e2), and at most one null element. As implied by its name, this interface models the mathematical set abstraction. –  Santi May 25 at 12:01

If this is for school, you may need to avoid convenience methods. Here is a simple way to do it:

    ArrayList<String> al = new ArrayList<String>();
    al.add("a");
    al.add("b");
    al.add("c");
    al.add("d");
    al.add("e");
    al.add("f");
    al.add("g");
    al.add("h");

    int chooseNum = 3;
    Random rand = new Random();
    int index;
    String val;
    while (chooseNum > 0 && chooseNum <= al.size()) {
        index = rand.nextInt(al.size());
        val = al.remove(index);
        System.out.print(val);
        System.out.print(" ");
        chooseNum--;
    }
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I think Braj's answer is the most elegant, but if performance matters to you, here are a couple alternatives:

Partial shuffle

This is like Braj's answer. Except it is O(k) instead of O(n) (where k is the number of elements picked and n the size of the input).

/**
 * Randomly picks elements from a set.
 *
 * @param k Number of elements to choose.
 * @return A list containg k elements from the set.
 */
public Set<T> randomPick(int k) {
    T[] a = (T[]) new Object[k];
    a = this.inputSet.toArray(a);

    int n = a.length;

    if (k < 0 || k > n) {
        String msg = String.format(
                "Cannot pick %0 elements from a set that contains %1 elements.",
                k, n);
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(msg);
    }

    Random random = new Random();

    for (int i = 0; i < k; i++) {
        // Swap a[i] with a random element in the unswapped elements
        int r = i + random.nextInt(n - i);
        T temp = a[i];
        a[i] = a[r];
        a[r] = temp;
    }
    T[] output = Arrays.copyOfRange(a, 0, k);
    return new HashSet<T>(Arrays.asList(output));
}

Tries to pick again until number of picked elements is as expected

This is quite straightforward.

I suppose it is faster if k is small, and becomes less efficient when k gets close to n.

/**
 * Randomly picks elements from a set.
 *
 * @param k Number of elements to choose.
 * @return A list containg k elements from the set.
 */
public Set<T> randomPick2(int k) {
    List<T> list = new ArrayList<T>(this.inputSet);
    int n = list.size();

    if (k < 0 || k > n) {
        String msg = String.format(
                "Cannot pick %0 elements from a set that contains %1 elements.",
                k, n);
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(msg);
    }
    T[] a = (T[]) new Object[k];
    a = this.inputSet.toArray(a);

    Random random = new Random();

    Set<T> output = new HashSet<T>(k);
    while (output.size() < k) {
        int r = random.nextInt(n);
        output.add(a[r]);
    }
    return output;
}
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