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In order to understand how to use initializer_list, I'm writing a constructor of my own to fill a vector of integers (explanations here) :

#include <vector>

class X
{
  std::vector< int > *vec;
public:
  X(std::initializer_list<int>);
};

X(std::initializer_list<int> values)
{
  this->vec = new std::vector<int>(values);
}

The line

X(std::initializer_list<int> values)

is rejected by my g++ -std=c++11 : invalid declarator before values. Why ?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by πάντα ῥεῖ, Jonathan Wakely, dyp, 0x499602D2, ildjarn May 25 '14 at 22:01

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – πάντα ῥεῖ, Jonathan Wakely, dyp, 0x499602D2, ildjarn
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
Try X::X outside the class. – Bo Persson May 25 '14 at 13:40
4  
std::vector< int > *vec; Why a pointer?? – πάντα ῥεῖ May 25 '14 at 13:40
    
@πάντα ῥεῖ : you're right; of course, it was only an example. – suizokukan May 25 '14 at 13:45
    
@hellfire769 Adding an existing tag to the title is an inappropriate edit! – πάντα ῥεῖ May 25 '14 at 14:17
    
@πάντα ῥεῖ I didn't add the tag in the title, it was suizokukan – chook May 25 '14 at 14:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you've discovered, when you define member functions, including special member functions, outside the class definition, you must use the fully qualified name. This is necessary to indicate the function you're declaring is a member of that class, and not a free function. There are a couple of other things you should fix about your class definition.

class X
{
  std::vector< int > vec;
  //                ^^^     - it's unlikely this needs to be a pointer
public:
  X(std::initializer_list<int>);
};

X::X(std::initializer_list<int> values)
//^^^             - fully qualified name required
: vec(values)  // use the constructor initializer list 
               // instead of assignment within the body
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for all these details, specially for the ": vec(values)" syntax I didn't know. – suizokukan May 25 '14 at 20:30
    
@suizokukan For reference, here's the C++ FAQ on why one should prefer using the constructor initializer list. – Praetorian May 25 '14 at 21:07

As Bo Persson noticed :

X(std::initializer_list<int> values)

must be written

X::X(std::initializer_list<int> values)
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