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Hello I am very naive with regular expressions and I wasn't really able to find what I need.

For website validation purposes, I need first name and last name validation.

For first name it should only contain letters and can be several words with space and no letters and as minimum 3 characters and at top 30 characters. Empty string shouldnt be validated. Ie:

Jason, jason, jason smith, jason smith , JASON, Jason smith, jason Smith, jason SMITH

For the last name, it should be a single word, only letters and with at least 3 characters and at top 30 characers. Empty string shouldnt be validated. IE: lazslo, Lazslo, LAZSLO

I will be greatful for any help.

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1  
What about first names like 'Jo'? –  a'r Mar 5 '10 at 9:44
1  
just a remark: hyphens are common in lastnames ... maybe there are lastnames with spaces, too –  tanascius Mar 5 '10 at 9:45
2  
Don’t validate real names. –  Gumbo Mar 5 '10 at 9:45
2  
Note: a regularexpressionvalidator will ignore empty inputs: this might or might not be what you want. –  Hans Kesting Mar 5 '10 at 9:59
1  
If at all possible, unless you have an amazingly compelling reason for requiring a first and last name, just provide a single "Name" field. kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/… –  Chris Sep 12 '11 at 12:50

9 Answers 9

Don't forget about names like:

  • Mathias d'Arras
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Hector Sausage-Hausen

This should do the trick for most things:

/^[a-z ,.'-]+$/i

OR Support international names with super sweet unicode:

/^[a-zA-ZàáâäãåąčćęèéêëėįìíîïłńòóôöõøùúûüųūÿýżźñçčšžÀÁÂÄÃÅĄĆČĖĘÈÉÊËÌÍÎÏĮŁŃÒÓÔÖÕØÙÚÛÜŲŪŸÝŻŹÑßÇŒÆČŠŽ∂ð ,.'-]+$/u

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1  
I would escape the special characters in these regexps - especially . (decimal point/dot/full stop) since it's the regexp wildcard =) –  Joel Purra Aug 8 '12 at 18:45
5  
@JoelPurra It's already escaped by the [ ] (: –  wprl Sep 21 '12 at 20:57
2  
R2D2 doesn't validate :( –  bostaf Mar 2 '13 at 16:45
6  
You cannot validate all the possible national characters. For example Hungarian characters őŐűŰ are missing, Polish characters łŁ as well, not to mention a number of Lithuanian and Latvian characters. Rather try to find a library which transforms the exotic characters into the proper accent-less version, then write the /^[a-z ,.'-]+$/i regexp. –  GaborSch Mar 2 '13 at 16:53
7  
So is 陳大文 not a valid name here? –  Alvin Wong Apr 11 '13 at 0:53

You make false assumptions on the format of first and last name. It is probably better not to validate the name at all, apart from checking that it is empty.

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First name would be

"([a-zA-Z]{3,30}\s*)+"

If you need the whole first name part to be shorter than 30 letters, you need to check that seperately, I think. The expression ".{3,30}" should do that.

Your last name requirements would translate into

"[a-zA-Z]{3,30}"

but you should check these. There are plenty of last names containing spaces.

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Does this checks for spaces between? –  Y_Y Jan 2 at 2:13

If you want the whole first name to be between 3 and 30 characters with no restrictions on individual words, try this :

[a-zA-Z ]{3,30}

Beware that it excludes all foreign letters as é,è,à,ï.

If you want the limit of 3 to 30 characters to apply to each individual word, Jens regexp will do the job.

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I have searched and searched and played and played with it and although it is not perfect it may help others making the attempt to validate first and last names that have been provided as one variable.

In my case, that variable is $name.

I used the following code for my PHP:

    if (preg_match('/\b([A-Z]{1}[a-z]{1,30}[- ]{0,1}|[A-Z]{1}[- \']{1}[A-Z]{0,1}  
    [a-z]{1,30}[- ]{0,1}|[a-z]{1,2}[ -\']{1}[A-Z]{1}[a-z]{1,30}){2,5}/', $name)  
    # there is no space line break between in the above "if statement", any that   
    # you notice or perceive are only there for formatting purposes.  
    # 
    # pass - successful match - do something
    } else {
    # fail - unsuccessful match - do something

I am learning RegEx myself but I do have the explanation for the code as provided by RegEx buddy.
Here it is:

Assert position at a word boundary «\b»

Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 1
«([A-Z]{1}[a-z]{1,30}[- ]{0,1}|[A-Z]{1}[- \']{1}[A-Z]{0,1}[a-z]{1,30}[- ]{0,1}|[a-z]{1,2}[ -\']{1}[A-Z]{1}[a-z]{1,30}){2,5}»

Between 2 and 5 times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{2,5}»

* I NEED SOME HELP HERE WITH UNDERSTANDING THE RAMIFICATIONS OF THIS NOTE *

Note: I repeated the capturing group itself. The group will capture only the last iteration. Put a capturing group around the repeated group to capture all iterations. «{2,5}»

Match either the regular expression below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails) «[A-Z]{1}[a-z]{1,30}[- ]{0,1}»

Match a single character in the range between “A” and “Z” «[A-Z]{1}»

Exactly 1 times «{1}»

Match a single character in the range between “a” and “z” «[a-z]{1,30}»

Between one and 30 times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{1,30}»

Match a single character present in the list “- ” «[- ]{0,1}»

Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{0,1}»

Or match regular expression number 2 below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails) «[A-Z]{1}[- \']{1}[A-Z]{0,1}[a-z]{1,30}[- ]{0,1}»

Match a single character in the range between “A” and “Z” «[A-Z]{1}»

Exactly 1 times «{1}»

Match a single character present in the list below «[- \']{1}»

Exactly 1 times «{1}»

One of the characters “- ” «- » A ' character «\'»

Match a single character in the range between “A” and “Z” «[A-Z]{0,1}»

Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{0,1}»

Match a single character in the range between “a” and “z” «[a-z]{1,30}»

Between one and 30 times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{1,30}»

Match a single character present in the list “- ” «[- ]{0,1}»

Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{0,1}»

Or match regular expression number 3 below (the entire group fails if this one fails to match) «[a-z]{1,2}[ -\']{1}[A-Z]{1}[a-z]{1,30}»

Match a single character in the range between “a” and “z” «[a-z]{1,2}»

Between one and 2 times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{1,2}»

Match a single character in the range between “ ” and “'” «[ -\']{1}»

Exactly 1 times «{1}»

Match a single character in the range between “A” and “Z” «[A-Z]{1}»

Exactly 1 times «{1}»

Match a single character in the range between “a” and “z” «[a-z]{1,30}»

Between one and 30 times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{1,30}»

I know this validation totally assumes that every person filling out the form has a western name and that may eliminates the vast majority of folks in the world. However, I feel like this is a step in the proper direction. Perhaps this regular expression is too basic for the gurus to address simplistically or maybe there is some other reason that I was unable to find the above code in my searches. I spent way too long trying to figure this bit out, you will probably notice just how foggy my mind is on all this if you look at my test names below.

I tested the code on the following names and the results are in parentheses to the right of each name.

  1. STEVE SMITH (fail)
  2. Stev3 Smith (fail)
  3. STeve Smith (fail)
  4. Steve SMith (fail)
  5. Steve Sm1th (passed on the Steve Sm)
  6. d'Are to Beaware (passed on the Are to Beaware)
  7. Jo Blow (passed)
  8. Hyoung Kyoung Wu (passed)
  9. Mike O'Neal (passed)
  10. Steve Johnson-Smith (passed)
  11. Jozef-Schmozev Hiemdel (passed)
  12. O Henry Smith (passed)
  13. Mathais d'Arras (passed)
  14. Martin Luther King Jr (passed)
  15. Downtown-James Brown (passed)
  16. Darren McCarty (passed)
  17. George De FunkMaster (passed)
  18. Kurtis B-Ball Basketball (passed)
  19. Ahmad el Jeffe (passed)

If you have basic names, there must be more than one up to five for the above code to work, that are similar to those that I used during testing, this code might be for you.

If you have any improvements, please let me know. I am just in the early stages (first few months of figuring out RegEx.

Thanks and good luck, Steve

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This is what i use. This regex accepts only names with minimum characters, from A-Z a-z ,space and -.

Names example: Ionut Ionete, Ionut-Ionete Cantemir, Ionete Ionut-Cantemirm Ionut-Cantemir Ionete-Second

The limit of name's character is 3, if you want to genge this modify {3,} to {6,}

([a-zA-Z\-]+){3,}\s+([a-zA-Z\-]+){3,}
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For simplicities sake, you can use:

(.*)\s(.*).

The thing I like about this is that the last name is always after the last name, so if you're going to enter this matched groups into a database, and the name is John M. Smith, the 1st group will be John M., and the 2nd group will be Smith.

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var name = document.getElementById('login_name').value; 
if ( name.length < 4  && name.length > 30 )
{
    alert ( 'Name length is mismatch ' ) ;
} 


var pattern = new RegExp("^[a-z\.0-9 ]+$");
var return_value = var pattern.exec(name);
if ( return_value == null )
{
    alert ( "Please give valid Name");
    return false; 
} 
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I use:

/^(?:[\u00c0-\u01ffa-zA-Z'-]){2,}(?:\s[\u00c0-\u01ffa-zA-Z'-]{2,})+$/i

And test for maxlength using some other means

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