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I'd like to 'fake' a 404 page in Rails. In PHP, I would just send a header with the error code as such:

header("HTTP/1.0 404 Not Found");

How is that done with Rails?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 585 down vote accepted

Don't render 404 yourself, there's no reason to; Rails has this functionality built in already. If you want to show a 404 page, create a render_404 method (or not_found as I called it) in ApplicationController like this:

def not_found
  raise ActionController::RoutingError.new('Not Found')
end

Rails also handles AbstractController::ActionNotFound, and ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound the same way.

This does two things better:

1) It uses Rails' built in rescue_from handler to render the 404 page, and 2) it interrupts the execution of your code, letting you do nice things like:

  user = User.find_by_email(params[:email]) || not_found
  user.do_something!

without having to write ugly conditional statements.

As a bonus, it's also super easy to handle in tests. For example, in an rspec integration test:

# RSpec 1

lambda {
  visit '/something/you/want/to/404'
}.should raise_error(ActionController::RoutingError)

# RSpec 2+

expect {
  get '/something/you/want/to/404'
}.to raise_error(ActionController::RoutingError)
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102  
+1 for adding example test code! –  bantic Aug 18 '11 at 16:47
2  
There is a reason to do it yourself. If your application hijacks all of the routes from the root. It's bad design, but sometimes un-avoidable. –  ablemike Oct 3 '11 at 13:54
4  
This approach also lets you use the ActiveRecord bang finders (find!, find_by_...!, etc.), which all raise an ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound exception if no record is found (triggering the rescue_from handler). –  gjvis Jun 18 '12 at 17:59
2  
Seems like ActionController::RecordNotFound is the better option? –  Peter Ehrlich Feb 4 '13 at 4:59
2  
The code worked great but the test didn't until I realized I was using RSpec 2 which has different syntax: expect { visit '/something/you/want/to/404' }.to raise_error(ActionController::RoutingError) /via stackoverflow.com/a/1722839/993890 –  ryanttb Nov 5 '13 at 19:55

HTTP 404 Status

To return a 404 header, just use the :status option for the render method.

def action
  # here the code

  render :status => 404
end

If you want to render the standard 404 page you can extract the feature in a method.

def render_404
  respond_to do |format|
    format.html { render :file => "#{Rails.root}/public/404", :layout => false, :status => :not_found }
    format.xml  { head :not_found }
    format.any  { head :not_found }
  end
end

and call it in your action

def action
  # here the code

  render_404
end

If you want the action to render the error page and stop, simply use a return statement.

def action
  render_404 and return if params[:something].blank?

  # here the code that will never be executed
end

ActiveRecord and HTTP 404

Also remember that Rails rescues some ActiveRecord errors, such as the ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound displaying the 404 error page.

It means you don't need to rescue this action yourself

def show
  user = User.find(params[:id])
end

User.find raises an ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound when the user doesn't exist. This is a very powerful feature. Look at the following code

def show
  user = User.find_by_email(params[:email]) || raise("not found")
  # ...
end

You can simplify it by delegating to Rails the check. Simply use the bang version.

def show
  user = User.find_by_email!(params[:email])
  # ...
end
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5  
There's a big problem with this solution; it will still run the code in the template. So if you have a simple, restful structure and someone enters an ID that doesn't exist, your template will be looking for the object which doesn't exist. –  jcalvert Jul 2 '11 at 14:45
4  
As mentioned before, this is not the correct answer. Try Steven's. –  Pablo Marambio Jul 7 '11 at 18:57
    
Changed the selected answer to reflect the better practice. Thanks for the comments, guys! –  yuval Aug 14 '11 at 0:08
    
Voted up, because the "render :file ... :status => :not_found" line is very helpful for the corner case where I handle another exception, but want to serve a 404 header. –  richardsun Oct 7 '11 at 15:27
    
I updated the answer with more examples and a note about ActiveRecord. –  Simone Carletti Oct 25 '11 at 8:45

The newly Selected answer submitted by Steven Soroka is close, but not complete. The test itself hides the fact that this is not returning a true 404 - it's returning a status of 200 - "success". The original answer was closer, but attempted to render the layout as if no failure had occurred. This fixes everything:

render :text => 'Not Found', :status => '404'

Here's a typical test set of mine for something I expect to return 404, using RSpec and Shoulda matchers:

describe "user view" do
  before do
    get :show, :id => 'nonsense'
  end

  it { should_not assign_to :user }

  it { should respond_with :not_found }
  it { should respond_with_content_type :html }

  it { should_not render_template :show }
  it { should_not render_with_layout }

  it { should_not set_the_flash }
end

This healthy paranoia allowed me to spot the content-type mismatch when everything else looked peachy :) I check for all these elements: assigned variables, response code, response content type, template rendered, layout rendered, flash messages.

I'll skip the content type check on applications that are strictly html...sometimes. After all, "a skeptic checks ALL the drawers" :)

http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/1998-01-20/

FYI: I don't recommend testing for things that are happening in the controller, ie "should_raise". What you care about is the output. My tests above allowed me to try various solutions, and the tests remain the same whether the solution is raising an exception, special rendering, etc.

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1  
really like this answer, especially with regards to the testing of the output and not the methods called in the controller… –  xentek Mar 28 '13 at 20:38
    
Rails has built-in 404 status: render :text => 'Not Found', :status => :not_found. –  Lasse Bunk Dec 28 '13 at 13:17
    
@JaimeBellmyer - I'm certain it does not return a 200 when you're in a deployed (i.e. staging / prod) environment. I do this in several applications and it works as described in the accepted solution. Perhaps what you're referring to is that it returns a 200 when it renders the debug screen in development where you probably have the config.consider_all_requests_local parameter set to true in your environments/development.rb file. If you raise an error, as described in the accepted solution, in staging/production, you will definitely get a 404, not a 200. –  Javid Jamae Jul 30 at 19:01

these will help you...

Application Controller

 class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
      protect_from_forgery
      unless Rails.application.config.consider_all_requests_local             
        rescue_from ActionController::RoutingError, ActionController::UnknownController, ::AbstractController::ActionNotFound, ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound, with: lambda { |exception| render_error 404, exception }
      end

  private
    def render_error(status, exception)
      Rails.logger.error status.to_s + " " + exception.message.to_s
      Rails.logger.error exception.backtrace.join("\n") 
      respond_to do |format|
        format.html { render template: "errors/error_#{status}",status: status }
        format.all { render nothing: true, status: status }
      end
    end

Errors controller

 class ErrorsController < ApplicationController
      def error_404
        @not_found_path = params[:not_found]
      end
    end

views/errors/error_404.html.haml

.site
  .services-page 
    .error-template
      %h1
        Oops!
      %h2
        404 Not Found
      .error-details
        Sorry, an error has occured, Requested page not found!
        You tried to access '#{@not_found_path}', which is not a valid page.
      .error-actions
        %a.button_simple_orange.btn.btn-primary.btn-lg{href: root_path}
          %span.glyphicon.glyphicon-home
          Take Me Home
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The selected answer doesn't work in Rails 3.1+ as the error handler was moved to a middleware (see github issue).

Here's the solution I found which I'm pretty happy with.

In ApplicationController:

  unless Rails.application.config.consider_all_requests_local
    rescue_from Exception, with: :handle_exception
  end

  def not_found
    raise ActionController::RoutingError.new('Not Found')
  end

  def handle_exception(exception=nil)
    if exception
      logger = Logger.new(STDOUT)
      logger.debug "Exception Message: #{exception.message} \n"
      logger.debug "Exception Class: #{exception.class} \n"
      logger.debug "Exception Backtrace: \n"
      logger.debug exception.backtrace.join("\n")
      if [ActionController::RoutingError, ActionController::UnknownController, ActionController::UnknownAction].include?(exception.class)
        return render_404
      else
        return render_500
      end
    end
  end

  def render_404
    respond_to do |format|
      format.html { render template: 'errors/not_found', layout: 'layouts/application', status: 404 }
      format.all { render nothing: true, status: 404 }
    end
  end

  def render_500
    respond_to do |format|
      format.html { render template: 'errors/internal_server_error', layout: 'layouts/application', status: 500 }
      format.all { render nothing: true, status: 500}
    end
  end

and in application.rb:

config.after_initialize do |app|
  app.routes.append{ match '*a', :to => 'application#not_found' } unless config.consider_all_requests_local
end

And in my resources (show, edit, update, delete):

@resource = Resource.find(params[:id]) || not_found

This could certainly be improved, but at least, I have different views for not_found and internal_error without overriding core Rails functions.

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1  
this is a very nice solution; however, you dont need the || not_found part, just call find! (notice the bang) and it will throw ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound when the resource cannot be retrieved. Also, add ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound to the array in the if condition. –  maprihoda Apr 13 at 23:12

To test the error handling, you can do something like this:

feature ErrorHandling do
  before do
    Rails.application.config.consider_all_requests_local = false
    Rails.application.config.action_dispatch.show_exceptions = true
  end

  scenario 'renders not_found template' do
    visit '/blah'
    expect(page).to have_content "The page you were looking for doesn't exist."
  end
end
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