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I'm trying to implement an unordered_map for a vector< pair < int,int> >. Since there's no such default hash function, I tried to imagine a function of my own :

struct ObjectHasher
{
  std::size_t operator()(const Object& k) const
  {
    std::string h_string("");
    for (auto i = k.vec.begin(); i != k.vec.end(); ++i)
    {
      h_string.push_back(97+i->first);
      h_string.push_back(47); // '-'
      h_string.push_back(97+i->second);
      h_string.push_back(43); // '+'
    }
    return std::hash<std::string>()(h_string);
  }
};

The main idea is to change the list of integers, say ( (97, 98), (105, 107) ) into a formatted string like "a-b+i-k" and to compute its hash thanks to hash < string >(). I choosed the 97, 48 and 43 numbers only to allow the hash string to be easily displayed in a terminal during my tests.

I know this kind of function might be a very naive idea since a good hash function should be fast and strong against collisions. Well, if the integers given to push_back() are greater than 255 I don't know what might happen... So, what do you think of the following questions :

  • (1) is my function ok for big integers ?
  • (2) is my function ok for all environments/platforms ?
  • (3) is my function too low to be a hash function ?
  • (4) ... do you have anything better ?
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Writing a good hast function can be very hard. It might be better to use a std::map instead of an unordered_map with a poor hash function. –  TNA May 25 '14 at 21:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

All you need is a function to "hash in" an integer. You can steal such a function from boost:

template <class T>
inline void hash_combine(std::size_t& seed, const T& v)
{
    std::hash<T> hasher;
    seed ^= std::hash<T>(v) + 0x9e3779b9 + (seed<<6) + (seed>>2);
}

Now your function is trivial:

struct ObjectHasher
{
  std::size_t operator()(const Object& k) const
  {
    std::size_t hash = 0;
    for (auto i = k.vec.begin(); i != k.vec.end(); ++i)
    {
      hash_combine(hash, i->first);
      hash_combine(hash, i->second);
    }
    return hash;
  }
};
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1  
Could you explain the 0x9e... + ... magic? –  Baum mit Augen May 25 '14 at 21:23
    
It's just an algorithm known to distribute the hashed values reasonably well (spread single-bit differences over as many output bits as possible). Knuth proved that a prime close to (2^32 / [(sqrt(5)+1)/2]) works best. There are lots of other hashing algorithms you could use. –  David Schwartz May 25 '14 at 21:27
    
@DavidSchwartz Wouldn't this produce the same hash for the map containing the list (1, 2) as a map containing the list (2, 1) since xor is associative? –  mclaassen May 25 '14 at 22:10
    
@mclaassen No, because the seed is also used in ways that are not associative. –  David Schwartz May 25 '14 at 22:15
    
@DavidSchwartz Oh ok I see, you are also using the last value to compute the hash that then gets XORed –  mclaassen May 25 '14 at 22:19

This function is is probably very slow compared to other hash functions since it uses dynamic memory allocation. Also std::hash<std::string> Is not a very good hash function since it is very general. It's probably better to XOR all ints and use std::hash<int>.

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I don't think XORing all the numbers together works, there would be a very high rate of collision. –  mclaassen May 25 '14 at 21:07
    
if sizeof (int) == sizeof(size_t) it's nearly the best you can get. It's also very fast. –  TNA May 25 '14 at 21:17
    
@TNA XORing all the numbers would be the same regardless of the order you did it in. So it wouldnt capture the difference between say a number 5 being the 1st or 2nd number in the pair or whether that 5 was paired with a one number vs another –  mclaassen May 25 '14 at 21:21

This is a perfectly valid solution. All a hash function needs is a sequence of bytes and by concatenating your elements together as a string you are providing a unique byte representation of the map.

Of course this could become unruly if your map contains a large number of items.

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