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I have unsigned int (32bits) and want to divided into group of 3 short of 12 bits each. However, I unable to extract the numbers correctly. e.g. Let's say I have 32 bit unsigned int as follows :

1111 0000 1011 0000 1010 1001 1100 1101  

then I want something like this :

S1 = 1111 0000 1011 
s2 = 0000 1010 1001 
s3 = 1100 1101 

Program :

    #include<stdio.h>

    int main() {
            short s1,s2,s3 = 0
            unsigned int addr = 4194624;

            s1 = addr>>12;
            addr = addr>>12;
            printf("%d\n", s1);
            s2 = addr>>12;
            addr = addr>>12;
            printf("%d\n", s2);
            s3 = addr>>12;
            addr = addr>>12;
            printf("%d\n", s3);

            return 0;
    }
share|improve this question
    
you are modifying the addr variable, you should copy it in a temporary and do operation on it –  Rakib May 26 at 2:59
1  
Um, 12 * 3 = 36 which is greater than 32. You can have two 12-bit numbers and an 8-bit number, but you can't fit no more. –  Potatoswatter May 26 at 2:59
    
The shorts have at least 16 bits, so unless you really want to use 3 shorts, you only need two. –  7heo.tk May 26 at 3:00
    
@user3114046 How do I print it in binary ? can I ? I have started learning c language like one week back. –  user2737926 May 26 at 3:02
1  
What I mean is: is s3 supposed to be left justified so that it is actually 1100 1101 0000 or right justified so that it is 0000 1100 1101? –  jaket May 26 at 3:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This works for me.

// Just pick up the last 8 bits of addr and
// assign it to s3.
s3 = addr & 0xFF;

// Shift addr by 8 bits to the right, then pick up
// just the last 12 bits of the resulting number, and then
// assign it to s2.
s2 = (addr >> 8) & 0xFFF;

// Shift addr by 20 bits to the right and then assign
// the resulting number to s1.
s1 = (addr >> 20);
share|improve this answer
    
I think if you change it to s3 = (addr & 0xff) << 4; since the op wants s3 right padded with zeros. –  jaket May 26 at 3:26
1  
@jaket I didn't get that impression. However, hopefully they have the necessary info to do that, if they want to. –  R Sahu May 26 at 3:30

You can use such a function to extract bits:

short f( unsigned int number, int start, int end)
{
    unsigned int mask = (1 << (end - start)) - 1;
    return ( number >> start) & mask;
}

Then:

int main() {

    short s1,s2,s3 = 0;
    unsigned int addr = 4194624;

    s1 = f( addr, 20, 31);
    s2 = f( addr, 8, 19);
    s3 = f( addr, 0, 7);

    printf("%d\n", s1);
    printf("%d\n", s2);
    printf("%d\n", s3);
    return 0;
}

prints:

4

1

64

http://ideone.com/Q5mV94

share|improve this answer

Copied from comments - see you have a 32 bit number first what i did was i store that in another variable and then right shifted it by 20 bits so the new number with me is a 12 bit number and then the same operation of getting the desired number was done on the other two 12 bit chains

#includde<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

void main()
{
    unsigned long a=4194624,e;
    int b,c,d;
    e=a;
    e=e>>20;
    b=e;
    e=a;
    e=e<<12;
    e=e>>20;
    c=e;
    e=a;
    e=e<<24;
    e=e>>24;
    d=e;
    printf(" %d %d %d ",b,c,d);
    getch(); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please provide commentary for your answer so that the OP and future visitors to SO know what you're attempting here - and why. –  Jay Blanchard May 27 at 18:09
    
see you have a 32 bit number first what i did was i store that in another variable and then right shifted it by 20 bits so the new number with me is a 12 bit number and then the same operation of getting the desired number was done on the other two 12 bit chains –  Rishabh Sharma May 28 at 5:55

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