Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am dipping my toe into using a IoC framework and I have choosen to use Unity. One of the things that I still don't fully understand is how to resolve objects deeper into the application. I suspect I just haven't had the light bulb on moment that will make it clear.

So I am trying do something like the following in psuedo'ish code

void Workflow(IUnityContatiner contatiner, XPathNavigator someXml)
{
   testSuiteParser = container.Resolve<ITestSuiteParser>
   TestSuite testSuite = testSuiteParser.Parse(SomeXml) 
   // Do some mind blowing stuff here
}

So the testSuiteParser.Parse does the following

TestSuite Parse(XPathNavigator someXml)
{
    TestStuite testSuite = ??? // I want to get this from my Unity Container
    List<XPathNavigator> aListOfNodes = DoSomeThingToGetNodes(someXml)

    foreach (XPathNavigator blah in aListOfNodes)
    {
        //EDIT I want to get this from my Unity Container
        TestCase testCase = new TestCase() 
        testSuite.TestCase.Add(testCase);
    } 
}

I can see three options:

  1. Create a Singleton to store my unity container that I can access anywhere. I really am not a fan of this approach. Adding a dependency like that to use a dependency injection framework seems a little on the odd side.
  2. Pass the IUnityContainer to my TestSuiteParser class and every child of it (assume it is n levels deep or in reality about 3 levels deep). Passing IUnityContainer around everywhere just looks odd. I may just need to get over this.
  3. Have the light bulb moment on the right way to use Unity. Hoping someone can help flick the switch.

[EDIT] One of things that I wasn't clear on is that I want to create a new instance of test case for each iteration of the foreach statement. The example above needs to parse a test suite configuration and populate a collection of test case objects

share|improve this question
    
+1 for asking the right question. –  Stimul8d Sep 16 '10 at 9:59
6  
it's like asking if it's better to die in a fire or drown. –  Krzysztof Kozmic Apr 23 '11 at 8:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 38 down vote accepted

The correct approach to DI is to use Constructor Injection or another DI pattern (but Constructor Injection is the most common) to inject the dependencies into the consumer, irrespective of DI Container.

In your example, it looks like you require the dependencies TestSuite and TestCase, so your TestSuiteParser class should statically announce that it requires these dependencies by asking for them through its (only) constructor:

public class TestSuiteParser
{
    private readonly TestSuite testSuite;
    private readonly TestCase testCase;

    public TestSuiteParser(TestSuite testSuite, TestCase testCase)
    {
        if(testSuite == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(testSuite);
        }
        if(testCase == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(testCase);
        }

        this.testSuite = testSuite;
        this.testCase = testCase;
    }

    // ...
}

Notice how the combination of the readonly keyword and the Guard Clause protects the class' invariants, ensuring that the dependencies will be available to any successfully created instance of TestSuiteParser.

You can now implement the Parse method like this:

public TestSuite Parse(XPathNavigator someXml) 
{ 
    List<XPathNavigator> aListOfNodes = DoSomeThingToGetNodes(someXml) 

    foreach (XPathNavigator blah in aListOfNodes) 
    { 
        this.testSuite.TestCase.Add(this.testCase); 
    }  
} 

(however, I suspect that there may be more than one TestCase involved, in which case you may want to inject an Abstract Factory instead of a single TestCase.)

From your Composition Root, you can configure Unity (or any other container):

container.RegisterType<TestSuite, ConcreteTestSuite>();
container.RegisterType<TestCase, ConcreteTestCase>();
container.RegisterType<TestSuiteParser>();

var parser = container.Resolve<TestSuiteParser>();

When the container resolves TestSuiteParser, it understands the Constructor Injection pattern, so it Auto-Wires the instance with all its required dependencies.

Creating a Singleton container or passing the container around are just two variations of the Service Locator anti-pattern, so I wouldn't recommend that.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For explaining my point better then me :) –  Mattias Jakobsson Mar 5 '10 at 12:46
2  
+1 for having the guile to call Fowlers work an anti-pattern! –  Stimul8d Sep 16 '10 at 10:03
    
So you are saying you shouldn't pass the container around, and you shouldn't have it Static. I'm out of options then. In many cases I can't simply inject dependencies because I won't know until after user input what I need to do. Example: I have buttons that open different types of windows. When user presses button A I wan't to be able to say Container.Resolve<BaseWindows>("StringTiedToButtonA"). So should I have this as some kind of a service I inject in? –  Ingó Vals Feb 23 '11 at 14:43
2  
I'm saying that you should neither pass the container around or have it static. When you need to resolve a dependency from a run-time value, you can use an Abstract Factory. See e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/1926826/cant-combine-factory-di/… –  Mark Seemann Feb 23 '11 at 15:14
1  
Could you point to some place that explains this even better, like showing the container interaction as well. In your example you still need to have access to the container where you instantied the factory. How did the container get there? –  Ingó Vals Feb 23 '11 at 20:43

I am new to Dependency Injection and I also had this question. I was struggling to get my mind around DI, mainly because I was focusing on applying DI to just the one class that I was working on and once I had added the dependencies to the constructor, I immediately tried to find some way to get the unity container to the places where this class needed to be instantiated so that I could call the Resolve method on the class. As a result I was thinking along the lines of making the unity container globally available as a static or wrapping it in a singleton class.

I read the answers here and did not really understand what was being explained. What finally helped me "get it" was this article:

http://www.devtrends.co.uk/blog/how-not-to-do-dependency-injection-the-static-or-singleton-container

And this paragraph in particular was the "light bulb" moment:

"99% of your code base should have no knowledge of your IoC container. It is only the root class or bootstrapper that uses the container and even then, a single resolve call is all that is typically necessary to build your dependency graph and start the application or request."

This article helped me understand that I actually must not access the unity container all over the application, but only at the root of the application. So I must apply the DI principle repeatedly all the way back to the root class of the application.

Hope this helps others who are as confused as I was! :)

share|improve this answer

You should not really need to use your container directly in very many places of your application. You should take all your dependencies in the constructor and not reach them from your methods. You example could be something like this:

public class TestSuiteParser : ITestSuiteParser {
    private TestSuite testSuite;

    public TestSuitParser(TestSuit testSuite) {
        this.testSuite = testSuite;
    }

    TestSuite Parse(XPathNavigator someXml)
    {
        List<XPathNavigator> aListOfNodes = DoSomeThingToGetNodes(someXml)

        foreach (XPathNavigator blah in aListOfNodes)
        {
            //I don't understand what you are trying to do here?
            TestCase testCase = ??? // I want to get this from my Unity Container
            testSuite.TestCase.Add(testCase);
        } 
    }
}

And then you do it the same way all over the application. You will, of course, at some point have to resolve something. In asp.net mvc for example this place is in the controller factory. That is the factory that creates the controller. In this factory you will use your container to resolve the parameters for your controller. But this is only one place in the whole application (probably some more places when you do more advanced stuff).

There is also a nice project called CommonServiceLocator. This is a project that has a shared interface for all the popular ioc containers so that you don't have a dependency on a specific container.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I have updated my question. Does this clarify for you? –  btlog Mar 5 '10 at 12:55
1  
@btlog Mark Seemann has that included in his answer. A common solution is to inject a factory for the testcase in the constructor of your TestSuiteParser class. –  Mattias Jakobsson Mar 5 '10 at 13:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.