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Excuse the long post, but below I have included a full script to generate and populate my test harness.

My test harness has the following tables

|--------|  |-------------|  |-----|  |--------------|
|Column  |  |ColumnValue  |  |Row  |  |RowColumnValue|
|--------|  |-------------|  |-----|  |--------------|
|ColumnId|  |ColumnValueId|  |RowId|  |RowId         |
|Name    |  |ColumnId     |  |Name |  |ColumnValueId |
|--------|  |Value        |  |-----|  |--------------|
            |-------------|

They represent Rows and Columns in a table. The possible values of a cell in a column are stored in ColumnValue. The selected values for a Row are stored in RowColumnValue. (I hope that is clear)

I have populated the data with 10 Columns, 10,000 Rows, 50 Column Values per column (500) and 25 selected column values per Row (250,000).

I have some dynamic sql which returns all the rows, pivotted with the columns and contains an XML list of the selected column values for each column.

Note: For performance testing purposes I have wrapped the query in a SELECT COUNT(*) so that the query will not return a large amount of data over the network.

My test harness runs this query (with the count) in approx 5-6 seconds. The execution plan shows that 92% of the query is spent on a Clustered Index Seek on [ColumnValue].[PK_ColumnValue]. The Client Statistics show a Client processing time, Total execution time and Wait time on server replies all at 0.

I realise that 250k rows in the RowColumnValue table is quite a lot and I might be expecting too much from SQL Server. However, my expectation is that query should be able to run a lot faster than this. Or at the very least the execution plan should be presenting a different bottle neck rather than the Clustered Index Seek.

Can anyone shed any light on the problem or give me some suggestions on how to make this more efficient?

Dynamic SQL that runs the pivot to display the table:

DECLARE @columnDataList NVARCHAR(MAX)
SELECT
    @columnDataList = 
    CAST
    (
        (
            SELECT
                ', CONVERT(xml, [PVT].[' + [Column].[Name] + ']) [Column.' + [Column].[Name] + ']'
            FROM
                [Column]
            ORDER BY
                [Column].[Name]
            FOR XML PATH('')
        ) AS XML
    ).value('.', 'NVARCHAR(MAX)')

DECLARE @columnPivotList NVARCHAR(MAX)
SELECT
    @columnPivotList = 
    CAST
    (
        (
            SELECT
                ', [' + [Column].[Name] + ']'
            FROM
                [Column]
            ORDER BY
                [Column].[Name]
            FOR XML PATH('')
        ) AS XML
    ).value('.', 'NVARCHAR(MAX)')

EXEC('
    SELECT
        COUNT(*)
    FROM
    (
        SELECT
            [PVT].[RowId]
            ' + @columnDataList + '
        FROM
        (
            SELECT
                [Row].[RowId],
                [Column].[Name] [ColumnName],
                [XmlRowColumnValues].[XmlRowColumnValues] [XmlRowColumnValues]
            FROM
                [Row]
            CROSS JOIN
                [Column]
            CROSS APPLY
            (
                SELECT
                    [ColumnValue].[Value] [Value]
                FROM
                    [RowColumnValue]
                INNER JOIN
                    [ColumnValue]
                ON
                    [ColumnValue].[ColumnValueId] = [RowColumnValue].[ColumnValueId]
                WHERE
                    [RowColumnValue].[RowId] = [Row].[RowId]
                AND
                    [ColumnValue].[ColumnId] = [Column].[ColumnId]
                FOR XML PATH (''''), ROOT(''Values'')
            ) [XmlRowColumnValues] ([XmlRowColumnValues])
        ) [PivotData]
        PIVOT
        (
            MAX([PivotData].[XmlRowColumnValues])
        FOR
            [ColumnName]
            IN
            ([0]' + @columnPivotList + ')
        ) PVT
    ) RowColumnData
')

Script to generate and populate database:

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Row](
    [RowId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Name] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Row] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [RowId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Column](
    [ColumnId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Name] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Column] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [ColumnId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[RowColumnValue](
    [RowId] [int] NOT NULL,
    [ColumnValueId] [int] NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_RowColumnValue] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [RowId] ASC,
    [ColumnValueId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[ColumnValue](
    [ColumnValueId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [ColumnId] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Value] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_ColumnValue] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [ColumnValueId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [FKIX_ColumnValue_ColumnId] ON [dbo].[ColumnValue] 
(
    [ColumnId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[ColumnValue]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_ColumnValue_Column] FOREIGN KEY([ColumnId])
REFERENCES [dbo].[Column] ([ColumnId])
GO
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[ColumnValue] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_ColumnValue_Column]
GO
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[RowColumnValue]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_RowColumnValue_ColumnValue] FOREIGN KEY([ColumnValueId])
REFERENCES [dbo].[ColumnValue] ([ColumnValueId])
GO
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[RowColumnValue] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_RowColumnValue_ColumnValue]
GO
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[RowColumnValue]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_RowColumnValue_Row] FOREIGN KEY([RowId])
REFERENCES [dbo].[Row] ([RowId])
GO
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[RowColumnValue] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_RowColumnValue_Row]
GO

DECLARE @columnLoop INT
DECLARE @columnValueLoop INT
DECLARE @rowLoop INT

DECLARE @columnId INT
DECLARE @columnValueId INT
DECLARE @rowId INT

SET @columnLoop = 0

WHILE @columnLoop < 10
BEGIN

    INSERT INTO [Column] ([Name]) VALUES(NEWID())

    SET @columnId = @@IDENTITY

    SET @columnValueLoop = 0

    WHILE @columnValueLoop < 50
    BEGIN

        INSERT INTO [ColumnValue] ([ColumnId], [Value]) VALUES(@columnId, NEWID())

        SET @columnValueLoop = @columnValueLoop + 1

    END

    SET @columnLoop = @columnLoop + 1

END

SET @rowLoop = 0

WHILE @rowLoop < 10000
BEGIN

    INSERT INTO [Row] ([Name]) VALUES(NEWID())

    SET @rowId = @@IDENTITY

    INSERT INTO [RowColumnValue] ([RowId], [ColumnValueId]) SELECT TOP 25 @rowId, [ColumnValueId] FROM [ColumnValue] ORDER BY NEWID()

    SET @rowLoop = @rowLoop + 1

END
share|improve this question
7  
See this excellent post about why to avoid such a "meta-column/row" approach: simple-talk.com/sql/database-administration/… - check out #3 : Entity-Attribute-Value Table –  marc_s Mar 5 '10 at 12:27
    
I see the points, but I'm not sure I agree with "So what are the benefits that are touted for EAV? Well, there are none." though. Without a "meta" approach, for this example I would need to create ten tables to store the ColumnValues in. I would then need ten many to many tables to store the relationships between them. Add to this the fact that in reality this is a multi tenant database and the Column table also contains a ClientId to allow different columns per Client then the number of Create Table / Drop Table commands would be huge. –  Robin Day Mar 5 '10 at 13:24
1  
if you want speed from a database you need to work with how databases work best: fixed tables. Here is the non EAV query to select the rows: SELECT * FROM YourTable Where xyz=... which would be faster your huge PIVOT or this one? –  KM. Mar 5 '10 at 14:16
    
For starters, I am in NO WAY trying to build a database engine to store a table... The Row / Column table names were purely to make it easy to create a test harness and show how I wanted it to be returned for the query in question. The actual tables are a way of classifying data, a little like a tag cloud with the tags being the ColumnValue's with an additional "type of tag" which is the Column table. The item being tagged is the Row table. I will spend some time putting this actual concept into the question to see if anyone can come up with a better implementation. –  Robin Day Mar 5 '10 at 17:40
2  
IMO, there are select places in the world for EAVs however storage for a primary feature is not one of them. EAV's are like drugs: in small quantities and select circumstances, they can be beneficial. Too much will kill you. Used as a primary feature in a multi-tenant application is definitely too much. Dozens of tables is frankly tiny. It is quite common to have dbs with 50-100 or more tables. I think that if you provided more clarity about the classification system someone might be able to offer an alternate schema which would solve you performance issue here. –  Thomas Mar 6 '10 at 17:49
show 1 more comment

1 Answer 1

I agree with @marc_s and @KM that this grand design is doomed from the start.

Millions of Microsoft's developer-hours have gone into building and fine-tuning a robust and powerful database engine, but you're going to reinvent it all by cramming everything into a small number of generic tables and re-implementing everything that SQL Server is already engineered to do for you.

SQL Server already has tables containing names of entities, names of columns, and so on. The fact that you don't normally interact directly with these system tables is a good thing: It's called abstraction. And it's unlikely that you're going to do a better job of implementing that abstraction than SQL Server does.

At the end of the day, with your approach (a) even the simplest queries will be monstrous; and (b) you're never going to come close to optimal performance, because you're forgoing all of the query optimization that you'd otherwise get for free.

Without knowing anything more about your application or your requirements, it's hard to give any sort of specific advice. But I'd suggest that some good old normalization would go a long way. Any well-implemented, non-trivial database has a lot of tables; ten tables plus ten xtab tables shouldn't scare you away.

And don't be afraid of SQL code generation as a way of implementing common interfaces across disparate tables. A little can go a long way.

share|improve this answer
    
For starters, I am in NO WAY trying to build a database engine to store a table... The Row / Column table names were purely to make it easy to create a test harness and show how I wanted it to be returned for the query in question. The actual tables are a way of classifying data, a little like a tag cloud with the tags being the ColumnValue's with an additional "type of tag" which is the Column table. The item being tagged is the Row table. I will spend some time putting this actual concept into the question to see if anyone can come up with a better implementation. –  Robin Day Mar 5 '10 at 17:39
    
To add to that, the "Column" table would not be "10x", this was just in this example. There are currently ~3000 entries in the "Column" table, each would need it's own list of valid entries "ColumnValue" varying from 2-3 valid entries up to hundreds. Each Client has anything from 2-3 specific types of tagging up to some that classify their tags 20 different ways. –  Robin Day Mar 5 '10 at 17:46
    
@Robin - sorry then if I went off half-cocked. I look forward to seeing the details - please add a comment here so I'll see the revised post (or new question if you choose to do it that way). –  Herb Caudill Mar 5 '10 at 21:30
    
Whilst its quite a while later, I have a new question which is of a simliary nature. I'm trying to get rid of the EAV design. stackoverflow.com/questions/3013831/… –  Robin Day Jun 10 '10 at 13:43
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