Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a bunch of code where objects of type std::string are compared for equality against string literals. Something like this:

//const std:string someString = //blahblahblah;
if( someString == "(" ) {
   //do something
} else if( someString == ")" ) {
   //do something else
} else if// this chain can be very long

The comparison time accumulates to a serious amount (yes, I profiled) and so it'd be nice to speed it up.

The code compares the string against numerous short string literals and this comparison can hardly be avoided. Leaving the string declared as std::string is most likely inevitable - there're thousands lines of code like that. Leaving string literals and comparison with == is also likely inevitable - rewriting the whole code would be a pain.

The problem is the STL implementation that comes with Visual C++11 uses somewhat strange approach. == is mapped onto std::operator==(const basic_string&, const char*) which calls basic_string::compare( const char* ) which in turn calls std::char_traits<char>( const char* ) which calls strlen() to compute the length of the string literal. Then the comparison runs for the two strings and lengths of both strings are passed into that comparison.

The compiler has a hard time analyzing all this and emits code that traverses the string literal twice. With short literals that's not much time but every comparison involves traversing the literal twice instead of once. Simply calling strcmp() would most likely be faster.

Is there anything I could do like perhaps writing a custom comparator class that would help avoid traversing the string literals twice in this scenario?

share|improve this question
2  
If you analyzed that the problem are the calls to strlen() why do you keep comparing to string literals rather than comparing to a set of preconstructed std::string const objects? –  Dietmar Kühl May 26 '14 at 14:15
    
@DietmarKühl: There's so much of this code that I can't possibly declare all those literals as string objects and keep the code maintainable. –  sharptooth May 26 '14 at 14:17
1  
It'll be tricky to intercept the comparisons without modifying the client code... I'd try adding a template <size_t N> std::operator(const str&, const char (c&)[N]) - if that happens to bind better unambiguously then you can specialise it for N of 0,1,2,3,4 and defer to the existing comparison, or e.g. memcmp, otherwise. You can use e.g. casting of mem from c_str() to int16/int32 for a single comparison.... –  Tony D May 26 '14 at 14:21
1  
@TonyD: That seems to bind properly. –  sharptooth May 26 '14 at 14:32
1  
You could avoid all the stuff about char_traits and unexpected calculations by doing: char const *s = someString.c_str(); if ( !std::strcmp(s, "(")) { etc. –  Matt McNabb May 27 '14 at 0:53

6 Answers 6

Similar to Dietmar's solution, but with slightly less editing: you can wrap the string (once) instead of each literal

#include <string>
#include <cstring>
struct FastLiteralWrapper {
    std::string const &s;

    explicit FastLiteralWrapper(std::string const &s_) : s(s_) {}

    template <std::size_t ArrayLength>
    bool operator== (char const (&other)[ArrayLength]) {
        std::size_t const StringLength = ArrayLength - 1;
        return StringLength == s.size()
            && std::memcmp(s.data(), other, StringLength) == 0;
    }
};

and your code becomes:

const std:string someStdString = "blahblahblah";
// just for the context of the comparison:
FastLiteralWrapper someString(someStdString);
if( someString == "(" ) {
   //do something
} else if( someString == ")" ) {
   //do something else
} else if// this chain can be very long

NB. the fastest solution - at the cost of more editing - is probably to build a (perfect) hash or trie mapping string literals to enumerated constants, and then just switch on the looked-up value. Long if/else if chains usually smell bad IMO.

share|improve this answer

Well, aside from C++14's string_literal, you could easily code up a solution:

  1. For comparison with a single character, use a character literal and:

    bool operator==(const std::string& s, char c)
    {
      return s.size() == 1 && s[0] == c;
    }
    
  2. For comparison with a string literal, you can use something like this:

    template<std::size_t N>
    bool operator==(const std::string& s, char const (&literal)[N])
    {
      return s.size() == N && std::memcmp(s.data(), literal, N-1) == 0;
    }
    

Disclaimer:

  • The first might even be superfluous,
  • Only do this if you measure an improvement over what you had.
share|improve this answer
    
For the comparison with char (and/or as a specialisation of the second for N of 1), I'd try *s.c_str() == c - my intuition is that it will be faster (size() has required a pointer subtraction in every implementation I've checked - optimised for fast end() rather than size()). –  Tony D May 26 '14 at 14:58
1  
@Tony What if s is longer than your literal? –  rubenvb May 26 '14 at 14:59
    
hmmm... I should just concentrate on my movie :-/. That does necessitate a test that the second byte's NUL too... less performance difference. When rhs is known ASCIIZ you could use a cast and int16_t comparison as per my earlier comment on the question, but that has alignment issues on some systems. –  Tony D May 26 '14 at 15:04
    
@Dietmar yes indeed. That's easily fixed :-P –  rubenvb May 26 '14 at 18:05

If you have long chain of string literals to compare to there is likely some potential to deal with comparing prefixes to group common processing. Especially when comparing a known set of strings for equality with an input string, there is also the option to use a perfect hash and key the operations off an integer produced by those.

Since the use of a perfect hash will probably have the best performance but also requires major changes of the code layout, an alternative could be to determine the size of the string literals at compile time and use this size while comparing. For example:

class Literal {
    char const* d_base;
    std::size_t d_length;
public:
    template <std::size_t Length>
    Literal(char const (&base)[Length]): d_base(base), d_length(Length - 1) {}
    bool operator== (std::string const& other) const {
        return other.size() == this->d_length
            && !other.memcmp(this->d_base, other.c_str(), this->d_length);
    }
    bool operator!=(std::string const& other) const { return !(*this == other); }
};
bool operator== (std::string const& str, Literal const& literal) {
    return literal == str;
}
bool operator!= (std::string const& str, Literal const& literal) {
    return !(str == literal);
}

Obviously, this assumes that your literals don't embed null characters ('\0') other than the implicitly added terminating null character as the static length would otherwise be distorted. Using C++11 constexpr it would be possible to guard against that possibility but the code gets somewhat more complicated without any good reason. You'd then compare your strings using something like

if (someString == Literal("(")) {
    ...
}
else if (someString == Literal(")")) {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Shouldn't that be ... memcmp(...) == 0? –  Useless May 26 '14 at 14:50
    
@Useless: yes, I shall fix the error. Thanks! –  Dietmar Kühl May 26 '14 at 15:07

The fastest string comparison you can get is by interning the strings: Build a large hash table that contains all strings that are ever created. Ensure that whenever a string object is created, it is first looked up from the hash table, only creating a new object if no preexisting object is found. Naturally, this functionality should be encapsulated in your own string class.

Once you have done this, string comparison is equivalent to comparing their addresses.

This is actually quite an old technique first popularized with the LISP language.


The point, why this is faster, is that every string only has to be created once. If you are careful, you'll never generate the same string twice from the same input bytes, so string creation overhead is controlled by the amount of input data you work through. And hashing all your input data once is not a big deal.

The comparisons, on the other hand, tend to involve the same strings over and over again (like your comparing to literal strings) when you write some kind of a parser or interpreter. And these comparisons are reduced to a single machine instruction.

share|improve this answer
    
Avoiding bloat! You'll put the hardware guys out of a job :) –  Rob11311 May 27 '14 at 1:10
    
This is a great technique to have mentioned, but can be inefficient depending on the exact application requirements, data and hardware. Statements like "fastest string comparison you can get" and "hashing all your input data once is not a big deal." are over the top. –  Tony D May 27 '14 at 8:20
    
Hashing the static string literals only would be similar to an FSA table driven solution, conceptually. A fast hash function, based on strlen + str[0] + str[1] % NOT_VERY_BIG number, would reduce the number of comparisons dramatically, so long as the distribution of the static string literals was even. A table of just 251 elements would suffice and just require 1KiB –  Rob11311 May 27 '14 at 13:33
    
Avoiding very long if .. else if comparison chains, still needs the processing done by function ptrs, in a table though. Hopefully the CPU branch predictor works well –  Rob11311 May 27 '14 at 13:47

2 other ideas :

A) Build a FSA using a lexical analyser tool like flex, so the string is converted to an integer token value, depending what it matches.

B) Use length, to break up long elseif chains, possibly partly table driven

Why not get the length of the string something, at the top then just compare against the literals it could possibly match.

If there's a lot of them, it may be worth making it table driven and use a map and function pointers. You could just special case the single character literals, for example perhaps using a function lookup table.

Finding non-matches fast and the common lengths may suffice, and not require too much code restructuring, but be more maintainable as well as faster.

int len = strlen (something);
if ( ! knownliterallength[ len]) {
    // not match
    ...
} else {
    // First char may be used to index search, or literals are stored in map with *func()

    switch (len)
    {
        case 1:  // Could use a look table index by char and *func()
            processchar( something[0]);
        break;

        case 2: // Short strings
        case 3: 
        case 4:
            processrunts( something);
        break

        default:
        //  First char used to index search, or literals are stored in map with *func()
            processlong( something);
        break
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Upvote for the lexer. It is made for scenarios like this. –  nwp May 27 '14 at 6:02

This is not the prettiest solution but it has proved quite fast when there is a lot of short strings to be compared (like operators and control characters/keywords in a script parser?).

Create a search tree based on string length and only compare characters. Try to represent known strings as an enumeration if this makes it cleaner in the particular implementation.

Short example:

enum StrE {
  UNKNOWN = 0 ,
  RIGHT_PAR ,
  LEFT_PAR ,
  NOT_EQUAL ,
  EQUAL
};

StrE strCmp(std::string str)
{
  size_t l = str.length();
  switch(l)
  {
    case 1:
    {
      if(str[0] == ')') return RIGHT_PAR;
      if(str[0] == '(') return LEFT_PAR;
      // ...
      break;
    }
    case 2:
    {
      if(str[0] == '!' && str[1] == '=') return NOT_EQUAL;
      if(str[0] == '=' && str[1] == '=') return EQUAL;
      // ...
      break;
    }
    // ...
  }
  return UNKNOWN;
}



int main()
{
  std::string input = "==";

  switch(strCmp(input))
  {
    case RIGHT_PAR:
      printf("right par");
      break;
    case LEFT_PAR:
      printf("left par");
      break;
    case NOT_EQUAL:
      printf("not equal");
      break;
    case EQUAL:
      printf("equal");
      break;
    case UNKNOWN:
      printf("unknown");
      break;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.