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I'm trying to understand what this line does, but being a pretty new Java programmer I am getting a little confused. Any help would be appreciated!

JComponent container = menu == null ? popupMenu : menu;
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closed as off-topic by tereško, Paul Butcher, Andrew, Leri, Jeremy Dec 31 '13 at 18:36

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menu = JMenu and popupMenu = JPopupMenu. if you need more information let me know, haha because I'm not sure what it does I'm not sure what is necessary to interpret –  Sean Martin Mar 5 '10 at 14:07
3  
That operator, using the ? and :, is called a Ternary Operator. Just as an FYI. –  Ascalonian Mar 5 '10 at 14:21

12 Answers 12

up vote 87 down vote accepted

This is called a ternary operator

JComponent container;
if (menu == null)
  container = popupMenu;
else
  container = menu;
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By far the most easily-understood answer. –  Adam Robinson Mar 5 '10 at 14:08
    
yes very easy thank you. so the ? represents equals to? and the : separates the two possible answers? –  Sean Martin Mar 5 '10 at 14:12
3  
"Another conditional operator is ?:, which can be thought of as shorthand for an if-then-else statement (...). This operator is also known as the ternary operator because it uses three operands." From java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/op2.html –  ccheneson Mar 5 '10 at 14:12
1  
An expression in the form of aBoolean ? ifTrue : ifNotTrue; will evaluate to ifTrue if the aBoolean is true. Thus the ? represents "if true then.." and the : represents "but if not true then...". –  Pindatjuh Mar 5 '10 at 14:13
3  
I know I'm being picky, but omitting the curly braces would be closer to what the ternary operator is. This code can execute multiple statements between the braces, the ternary operator can NOT. –  Armstrongest Mar 5 '10 at 14:25

It is equal to the following:

  JComponent container;
  if (menu == null)
       container = popupMenu;
  else
       container = menu;
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1  
I love the omission of the curly braces. It's more in the "spirit" of the ternary operator, which can only handle single statements. –  Armstrongest Mar 5 '10 at 14:24
7  
Sorry to nitpick but the ternary operator handles expressions, not statements. –  Tronic Mar 5 '10 at 14:28
5  
It is customary to acknowledge inspiration from other answers. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 8 '10 at 13:44

It's the ternary operator, which is a shorthand form for a simple if/else statement. In this case

if( menu == null )
    container = popupMene 
else
    container = menu;

The operator was first made available in C and consequently occurs in most C derived languages (Java, C++, C#, Javascript etc.)

Ternaries are extremely useful for writing compact code and are no less readable than an if/else once you get used to them. However there is sometimes a tendency to embed ternary conditions inside ternary conditions, such as

a = (b == c) ? d : ((e==f) ? g : h);

Which sets a to d if b equals c, or if b is not equal to c then either g or h depending on whether e equals f. Whilst succinct this sort of code can deteriorate into difficult to read bug inclined statements quite fast.

Where should you use them? Personally I tend use ternaries predominantly for initializations and other situations where the decision is going to remain simple, for example testing if a GET parameter is available in PHP and defaulting if not.

$intFoo = isset($_GET['q']) ? $_GET['q'] : 0;

On the other hand if my condition is inside a block of code and is concerned with the main logic flow of the program then I would be more likely to use an if/else, even if the actions are one line each. This is both because it tends to reduce maintenance bugs later, and as as if/else's are indented then it's also clearer at a glance what's happening to the logic.

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It compares menu to null and uses popupMenu (if it was null) or menu (if it wasn't) to initialize container.

Maybe it is easier to read with extra parenthesis:

JComponent container = ((menu == null) ? popupMenu : menu);
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It sets container to menu, unless menu is null in which case it sets container to popupMenu instead.

In other words, popupMenu is acting as a default value.

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It is the equivalent of

JComponent container;
if( menu == null )
    container = popupMenu;
else
    container = menu;
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Pseudo:

If menu is null
    set container to popupMenu
if menu is something
    set container to menu
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Sometimes I write my ternary operators like this:

JComponent container = (menu == null) 
   ? popupMenu 
   : menu; // else
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You will most likely need to add //-s to avoid a reformatter changing your layout. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 8 '10 at 13:45
    
@Thor. Interesting. I've never had a problem with it in VS2010 at least. What reformatter does this happen in? Just curious. –  Armstrongest May 8 '10 at 21:10

It's ternary operator. Equivalent to:

JComponent container;
if (menu == null) {
  container = popupMenu;
}
else {
  container = menu;
}

JComponent container = (condition) ? (if_true) : (if_false);

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2  
JComponent should be declared outside the block. You're also missing a curly brace. –  Armstrongest Mar 5 '10 at 14:29

Note that the two result parts of a ternary condition need to be compatible in type and assignable to any preceding variable.

So you can do:

Object x = true ? new String() : new Date();

because both String and Date are assignable to Object.

But not:

String x = true ? new String() : new Date();

Nor:

Object x = true ? returnNothing() : new Date();

private static void returnNothing() {}
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IF MENU == NULL THEN 
    MENU = POPUPMENU 
ELSE 
   MENU=MENU
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4  
woah, easy on the caps lock mister! –  Skilldrick Mar 5 '10 at 14:09
    
nope, try again :) –  rsp Mar 5 '10 at 14:09
1  
sorry for the caps –  Luca Rocchi Mar 5 '10 at 14:12
    
not menu is assigned to, but container... –  rsp Mar 5 '10 at 15:02

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