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I am new at Dart; and, I created a List of playing card objects called Deck. I am trying to select a random card, then remove the card from the deck. I am getting duplicates, as it appears subsequent cards are picked before the deck is reduced. How would I handle a future chain of events that will pick 10 unique random cards from the deck?

class Card{
String face;
String suit;
String rank;
String imgSrc;
String holdImgSrc;

Card(
 this.face,
 this.suit,
 this.rank,
 this.imgSrc,
 this.holdImgSrc
 );
}
import 'dart:math' show Random;
Random indexGen = new Random();


getCard1(){
  card1 = deck[indexGen.nextInt(deck.length)];
  deck.removeWhere((item) => item == card1);
  return card1;  
}         

getCard2(){
  card2 = deck[indexGen.nextInt(deck.length)];
  deck.removeWhere((item) => item == card2);
  return card2;
}

When I try to return a Card Object as a future I get:

new Future((getCard1()))
  .then((getCard2()))
  .then((getCard3()));

type 'Card' is not a subtype of type '() => dynamic' of 'computation'.

When I try to return the deck List I get:

type 'List' is not a subtype of type '() => dynamic' of 'computation'.

Am i missing the right syntax, flaw in my logic, or do I need to handle the list differently, by maybe watching for changes?

edit to add: The futures syntax works, however, the deletes do not appear to be happening correctly. I changed the code, to the code suggested by Jim-Y below, except for preloading new Card objects from a List using the second named constructor. The amended code and printout is as follows:

fullDeck[
...
var tenC  = new Card.full(17,'10_of_clubs','c','10','10_of_clubs.png','10_of_clubs_h.png');
var tenD  = new Card.full(18,'10_of_diamonds','d','10','10_of_diamonds.png','10_of_diamonds_h.png');
var tenS  = new Card.full(19,'10_of_spades','s','10','10_of_spades.png','10_of_spades_h.png');
var tenH  = new Card.full(20,'10_of_clubs','c','10','10_of_clubs.png','10_of_clubs_h.png');
...]

Deck<Card> deck = new Deck<Card>();
  Random indexGen = new Random();

   for(var c = 0; c < 20; ++c) {
     var card = new Card(c);
     deck.add(fullDeck[c]);//List of 52 full card objects

           }

   for(var i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
     var rnd = indexGen.nextInt(deck.size());
     print('${deck.get(rnd).face} Deck size: ${deck.size()}');           
           }

         }

4_of_clubs Deck size: 19
10_of_diamonds Deck size: 18
5_of_clubs Deck size: 17
4_of_spades Deck size: 16
5_of_spades Deck size: 15
10_of_clubs Deck size: 14
10_of_clubs Deck size: 13
3_of_spades Deck size: 12
5_of_diamonds Deck size: 11
3_of_diamonds Deck size: 10

As you can see the 10 of Clubs is printed twice. So, If the 10 was removed in pass 6, why is it still there in pass 7?

share|improve this question
    
what are the card1 and card2 variables you use in getCardX() –  Günter Zöchbauer May 26 '14 at 16:15
    
They are Card Objects. The list deck is filled with Card Objects. –  ubiquitousDave May 26 '14 at 17:37
    
You are calling getCard1 directly, and using the returned Card object as argument to new Future(). For correct types, you need to write new Future(getCard1).then((_)=>getCard2()).then((_)=>getCard3()). It still won't remember the cards that were removed. –  lrn May 26 '14 at 17:52
    
Irn: You are correct about remembering the cards. They are declared as globals, but are not updated. More learning curve ahead :) –  ubiquitousDave May 26 '14 at 19:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to chain the calls this way the methods must return a future:

Caution: I have not tested the code:

// I don't see what type 'Card' actually is from your code
Future<Card> getCard1(){
  return new Future(() {
    card1 = deck[indexGen.nextInt(deck.length)];
    deck.removeWhere((item) => item == card1);
    return card1;  
  });
}  

the same for getCard2()

Future<Card> getCard2(){
  return new Future(() {
    card2 = deck[indexGen.nextInt(deck.length)];
    deck.removeWhere((item) => item == card2);
    return card2;
  });
}

you call it with

getCard1().then((c) => getCard2()).then((c) => print(c));

as getCard1 and getCard2 are essentially the same methods you could combine them to one

List<Card> cards = [];

Future<Card> getCard(int i){
  return new Future(() {
    cards[i] = deck[indexGen.nextInt(deck.length)]; // not clear what card is 
    deck.removeWhere((item) => item == card[i]);
    return card[i];  
  });
}  

.

getCard(1).then((c) => getCard(2)).then((c) => print(c));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the super quick reply and clarification. Added the Class declaration; and, modifying the method gets me past the error message! –  ubiquitousDave May 26 '14 at 16:22
    
card is: Card card1; –  ubiquitousDave May 26 '14 at 16:47
    
ok. on combined method I tried: deck.removeWhere((item) => item == cards[i]); return cards[i]; and called as you suggested. now I am getting The null object does not have a method 'then'. –  ubiquitousDave May 26 '14 at 17:18
1  
Remember to return the future from the getCard functions. –  lrn May 26 '14 at 17:46
    
Also, you can use removeAt to remove the card: cards[i] = deck.removeAt(indexGen.nextInt(deck.length));. Much simpler, and more efficient, than using removeWhere when you already know the index. –  lrn May 26 '14 at 18:05

I can't see now why you need to use Futures for this. In the following code, i will try to address a possibly better approach of removing a Card from a deck using Dart's generic features :)

Your original Card class, I extended it for demonstrational purpose:

class Card {
  int id;
  String face;
  String suit;
  String rank;
  String imgSrc;
  String holdImgSrc;

  Card(this.id);
  Card.full(this.id, this.face, this.suit, this.rank, this.imgSrc, this.holdImgSrc);
}

Then, you could make a generic container for your cards instead of using a simple List.

class Deck<T extends Card> {
  List<T> _container = new List<T>();

  T get(int index) => _container.removeAt(index);
  void add(T item) => _container.add(item);
  int size() => _container.length;
}

This would make your example easier to extend later, and you gain much expression power with it.

Then, you could write something like this, to remove 10 random elements from the deck.

void main() {
  Deck<Card> deck = new Deck<Card>();
  Random indexGen = new Random();

  for(var c = 0; c < 20; ++c) {
    var card = new Card(c);
    deck.add(card);
  }

  for(var i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
    var rnd = indexGen.nextInt(deck.size());
    print('${deck.get(rnd).id} Deck size: ${deck.size()}');
  }
}

On this simple example, with these simple card objects there are no duplicates. However, if you need to, you could extend your Deck class with a(n) fGet method what could be a method returning a Future as mentioned before by @Günter.

I hope i gave you some good ideas :)

Cheers

share|improve this answer
    
cool. So we move to a class with a getter and a setter, but I do not see what is to keep the same random number from being generated on occasion. What about the intersection of a Set?var deck = new Set();//all 52 cards var drawnCards = new Set(); var myTenCards = new Set(); var listDeck = new List(52); while (myTenCards.length < 10){ drawnCards.add(listDeck[indexGen.nextInt]) myTenCards = deck.intersection(drawnCards); } –  ubiquitousDave May 27 '14 at 13:28
    
I agree the futures seem unnecessary. And to avoid getting the same card twice, I'd say the simplest and perhaps truest to the domain would be shuffle the cards and then take the first 10. That is, generate a random permutation of the deck. There's a simple algorithm for that (Knuth shuffle). –  Alan Knight May 27 '14 at 14:54
    
Alan. For the shuffle, yours is the best pragmatic solution. I was trying to emulate a real deck, by removing one at a time, which led me question why my algorithm was failing with duplicates, so the question was an academic sorta, how to do it this way. The Set method above created duplicates as well. Thanks –  ubiquitousDave May 27 '14 at 15:07
    
T get(int index) => _container.removeAt(index); Is the key for not generating the same numbers again, and again, but not the way as you would expect. removeAt will not only return an item, but it will remove that item from the container and Dart will rearrange (shift left the indexes) the elements. So in the next turn, the rnd num generator will create a random number between [0-19). There are many possiblities not to remove the card from the list, just make it exclusive for the next round. –  Jim-Y May 27 '14 at 17:34
    
Gotcha thanks. In the original, i assumed the repeated numbers were do to asynchronous operations moving faster than the deletes. upon further examination, it appears that the indexes do not update as they should after a delete. –  ubiquitousDave May 27 '14 at 19:31

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