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I'm new to python and trying to remove certain elements from a list without knowing the entire string. What I'm doing is using regex to parse out TLD's from a text document. This works just fine, however, it's also grabbing strings that have file extensions as well(i.e. myfile.exe, which I don't want included). My functions is as follows:

def find_domains(txt):

    # Regex out domains   
    lines = txt.split('\n')
    domains = []

    for line in lines:
        line  = line.rstrip()
        results = re.findall('([\w\-\.]+(?:\.|\[\.\])+[a-z]{2,6})', line)
        for item in results:
            if item not in domains:
                domains.append(item)

This works just fine, like I said, but my list ends up looking like:

domains = ['thisisadomain.com', 'anotherdomain.net', 'a_file_I_dont_want.exe', 'another_file_I_dont_want.csv']

I tried using:

domains.remove(".exe")

but it seems that if I don't know the whole string, this won't work. Is there a way to use a wildcard or iterate over the list to remove the unknown elements based just on the extensions? Thanks for any help and if more information is needed I'll try and offer more.

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[d for d in domains if not 'exe' in d] –  Rob W May 26 '14 at 16:20
2  
You can do what rob suggested, but using not d.endswith('.exe') is better imo –  Tim Castelijns May 26 '14 at 16:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would use the bultin str.endswith function for this. It returns True if the string ends with the specified suffix.

It's an easy function to use, see the example below. As of python 2.5 you can pass it tuples of suffixes.

def find_domains(txt):

    # Regex out domains   
    lines = txt.split('\n')
    domains = []
    unwanted_extensions = ('.exe', '.net', '.csv') # tuple containing unwanted extensions, add more if you want.

    for line in lines:
        line  = line.rstrip()
        results = re.findall('([\w\-\.]+(?:\.|\[\.\])+[a-z]{2,6})', line)
        for item in results:
            # check if item is not in domains already and if item doesn't end with any of the unwanted extensions.
            if item not in domains and not item.endswith(unwanted_extensions):
                domains.append(item)

As you can see all that is needed it to specify the extensions you don't want (did that in the unwanted_extensions tuple, and then add a condition to the if to make sure item does not end with any of them.

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1  
Bingo! thank you very much for the quick reply, worked perfectly –  v3rbal May 26 '14 at 16:37

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