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I've been trying to understand encryption/decryption code of TripleDES for some days. And I have seen many codes in the google, and the code shown below is one of them.

static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        string original = "Here is some data to encrypt!";
        TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider myTripleDES = new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider();
        byte[] encrypted = EncryptStringToBytes(original, myTripleDES.Key, myTripleDES.IV);
        string encrypt = Convert.ToBase64String(encrypted);
        string roundtrip = DecryptStringFromBytes(encrypted, myTripleDES.Key, myTripleDES.IV);
        Console.WriteLine("encryted:   {0}", encrypt);
        Console.WriteLine("Round Trip: {0}", roundtrip);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }



    static byte[] EncryptStringToBytes(string plainText, byte[] Key, byte[] IV)
    {

        byte[] encrypted; 
        using (TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider tdsAlg = new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider())
        {
            tdsAlg.Key = Key;
            tdsAlg.IV = IV;
            ICryptoTransform encryptor = tdsAlg.CreateEncryptor(tdsAlg.Key, tdsAlg.IV);
            using (MemoryStream msEncrypt = new MemoryStream())
            {
                using (CryptoStream csEncrypt = new CryptoStream(msEncrypt, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
                {
                    using (StreamWriter swEncrypt = new StreamWriter(csEncrypt))
                    {
                        swEncrypt.Write(plainText);
                    }
                    encrypted = msEncrypt.ToArray();
                }
            }
        }
        return encrypted;
    }


    static string DecryptStringFromBytes(byte[] cipherText, byte[] Key, byte[] IV)
    { 
        string plaintext = null; 
        using (TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider tdsAlg = new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider())
        {
            tdsAlg.Key = Key;
            tdsAlg.IV = IV;
            ICryptoTransform decryptor = tdsAlg.CreateDecryptor(tdsAlg.Key, tdsAlg.IV);
            using (MemoryStream msDecrypt = new MemoryStream(cipherText))
            {
                using (CryptoStream csDecrypt = new CryptoStream(msDecrypt, decryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Read))
                {
                    using (StreamReader srDecrypt = new StreamReader(csDecrypt))
                    {
                        plaintext = srDecrypt.ReadToEnd();
                    }
                }
            }

        }

        return plaintext;

    } 

There is no error in the code. I works fine. But strangely I noticed that the plainText is never been encoded. There is no line like Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(plainText); or Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(plainText); or similar like that. So, my question is , how does (in the code) the plainText which is a string gets converted to the encrypted byte? Is there any work done inside the streams? If thats so then where and how? As far as I understood there is no such line in between the streams that converts the string to byte. So , How does the overall code is working without this basic transformation?

Update: Is this code really a valid code?

share|improve this question
1  
The StreamWriter converts the string to UTF-8 bytes. – Sam May 26 '14 at 20:16
    
really? I didn't know that. – Giliweed May 26 '14 at 20:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are sending the plaintext to the encryption stream in the line swEncrypt.Write(plaintext). This does the byte conversion.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I didn't know StreamWriter does that. Now everything is clear. – Giliweed May 26 '14 at 20:21

The StreamWriter is doing the encoding. The constructor being used specifies UTF-8 encoding:

This constructor creates a StreamWriter with UTF-8 encoding without a Byte-Order Mark (BOM)

share|improve this answer
    
I feel silly for asking this question. I should have done more studying about the streams! I always tried to avoid streams but now I understand there is no escaping from "streams". All the answers are in the streams. – Giliweed May 26 '14 at 20:25

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