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Lots of resources say to let the errors "bubble up" from the lower layers, but I am not sure how to achieve that in my application. Do I need to create a separate utility class for validation or other errors and listen for it at each layer?

For example, if user enters a email address and only unique email addresses are allowed, I assume that I would check for this in the business layer. When I invoke the business logic from UI, do I just include output parameters in my business classes for errors / error msgs. Should I treat handled exceptions the same as business rule exceptions?

Here is a BLL code example:

public class user()
{
    public void Save(UserObject myUser, out bool result, out string resultMsg )
    {
    }

    OR

    string saveResultMsg;

    public bool Save(UserObject myUser)
    {
        saveResultMsg = "bad data whatever";
        return false;    

    }

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This really depends on what you are looking to do, ideally an exception should be used for exceptional circumstances and not to control the process flow.

I'm a fan of an internal validation process and having a Boolean "Save" method. If false, you can check a "Validation Exceptions" property to see what the rules were that were violated for the entry to not save.

You could also use exceptions if needed, just be sure to use an appropriate exception type and NOT the base Exception class.

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@Mitchel Sellers - for example, if I invoke the save method from my BLL to the DAL and there is a database error, how do I get that error back up to the UI layer? Your comment about just having boolean SAVE and a basic class property for the error details make perfect sense for UI consuming a business class. thx –  JPShook Mar 5 '10 at 19:23
    
It depends, technically, you could just let the exception go, as you cannot recover from it, and let the UI handle the error. Database connectvity issues are something that I typically recommend allowing to bubble up to the top. –  Mitchel Sellers Mar 5 '10 at 20:39

For example, if user enters a email address and only unique email addresses are allowed, I assume that I would check for this in the business layer. When I invoke the business logic from UI, do I just include output parameters in my business classes for errors / error msgs. Should I treat handled exceptions the same as business rule exceptions?

I prefer to provide a method the application layer can use to check uniqueness, then check again in the business layer and throw an exception if the caller attempts to save a duplicate value.

Unless the two database calls actually cause performance problems, I usually find that separating the command and query logic is worth it.

(I'm giving this advice with respect to business applications, most of which have modest performance requirements. There are many other types of software for which this approach isn't always - or ever - appropriate.)

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@Jeff Sternal - How do you recommend actually getting the errors from the DAL / BLL to the UI? –  JPShook Mar 5 '10 at 17:00
    
The UI is responsible for validating data before it calls the business or data access layers. If it hasn't done so properly, I recommend using exceptions to get the information to the UI. Neither the DAL or the BL should be catching exceptions they cannot actually handle (as opposed to log); that's the UI's job. –  Jeff Sternal Mar 5 '10 at 17:20

You could always create Custom Exceptions for your application, have your Business Layer throw those Exceptions when an error occurs, and then have your UI/Consumer properly handle those Custom Exceptions.

In your case, I would probably do something like:

[Serializable]
public class EmailValidationException : Exception
{
    // overriden constructors would go here

    private List<string> _validationMessages = new List<string>();

    // store your validation exception messages in a collection
    public ReadOnlyCollection<string> ValidationMessages 
    {
        get
        {
            return _validationMessages.AsReadOnly();
        }
    }
}
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@Justin Niessner - You would create a class like this for every type of validation or a generic error class/collection that can be reused. I am pretty new to .Net. –  JPShook Mar 5 '10 at 16:57

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