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I'm creating a web based point of sale (think cash register) solution with Django as the backend. I've always taken the 'classic' approach of modeling invoices and their line items.

InvoiceTable
  id
  date
  customer
  salesperson
  discount
  shipping
  subtotal
  tax
  grand_total
  [...]

InvoiceLineItems
  invoice_id // foreign key
  product_id
  unit_price
  qty
  item_discount
  extended_price
  [...]

After attempting to research best practices, I've found that there aren't many - at least no definitive source that's widely used.

The Kimball Group suggests: "Rather than holding onto the operational notion of a transaction header “object,” we recommend that you bring all the dimensionality of the header down to the line items."

See http://www.kimballgroup.com/2007/10/02/design-tip-95-patterns-to-avoid-when-modeling-headerline-item-transactions/ and http://www.kimballgroup.com/2001/07/01/design-tip-25-designing-dimensional-models-for-parent-child-applications/.

I'm new to development (only having used desktop database software before) - but from my understanding this makes sense as we can drill down the data any way we want for reporting purposes (though I imagine we could do the same with the first method by joining the tables).

My Questions

  • The invoice ID will need to be repeated for each row (so we can generate data like totals for the invoice). Is this an intentional feature of this way of modeling the data?
  • We often have invoice level data like notes, discounts, shipping charges, etc. - How do we represent these using this method? Some discounts are product specific - so they belong on the line item anyway, others are invoice wide (think of a deal where you buy two separate products and receive a discount on the two) - we could we somehow allocate it across the line items? Same with shipping charges, allocate it by dividing it among the line items?
  • What do we do with invoice 'notes' - we have printed and/or internal notes, would we put the data in the line items and just repeat it for each line item? That seems to go against data normalization. Put it in a related table?

    Any open source projects that use this method that I could take a look at? Not sure how to search for them.

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Hi, Welcome to StackOverflow. I count 6 questions in your rather long post. Please restrict your post to one question that can be answered. See the guidelines. StackOverflow is a bit different. –  Burhan Khalid May 27 '14 at 4:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like you're confusing relational design and dimensional design.

A relational design is for facilitating transaction processing, and minimizing data anomalies and duplication. It's your operational database. A dimensional design is for facilitating analysis.

A relational design will have an invoices table and a line_items table and a dimensional design will have a company_invoices_customer fact table with a grain of invoice line item.

Since this is for POS, I assume you want a relational design first.

As for your questions:

First there are tons of good data modelling patterns for this scenario. See http://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/12991/ready-to-use-database-models-example/23831#23831

The invoice ID will need to be repeated for each row (so we can generate data like totals for the invoice). Is this an intentional feature of this way of modeling the data?

Yes

We often have invoice level data like notes, discounts, shipping charges, etc. - How do we represent these using this method?

Probably easiest/simplest to have a "notes" field on the invoice table.

For charges and discounts you should use abstraction (see Table Inheritance), and add them as Order Adjustments. See the book by Silverston in the link above.

Some discounts are product specific - so they belong on the line item anyway, others are invoice wide (think of a deal where you buy two separate products and receive a discount on the two) - we could we somehow allocate it across the line items?

The price of the item should be calculated at runtime based on it's default price, and any discounts or charges that apply in the current "scenario", example discount for government, nearby, on sale day. You could have hierarchical line items that reference each other, to keep things in order. Again, see Silverston book.

What do we do with invoice 'notes' - we have printed and/or internal notes, would we put the data in the line items and just repeat it for each line item?

If you want line item notes, add a notes column on the line items table.

That seems to go against data normalization. Put it in a related table?

If notes are nullable, and you want to be strict about normalization, then yes, add a invoice_notes table.

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That's essentially it, reading books on dimension design led me to believe that I should somehow be using a dimensional approach even though a relational one with a invoice header and invoice line items child makes much more sense. Am I correct in assuming that the dimensional design is used more for data analysis? –  mikerrrrrr May 28 '14 at 22:42
    
Yes, if you want to make it easy for analysts to analyze your invoice data then that's where a data warehouse / dimensional design would come in. But if you are working on a interactive standard web app then you probably want a relational design. –  Neil McGuigan May 28 '14 at 22:58

Invoice / InvoiceLineItem is an example of a parent (Invoice) / Child (Item) relationship model, and is common in a normalized relational database. It looks like you are going about modelling the relationship correctly IMO.

The invoice ID will need to be repeated for each row (so we can generate data like totals for the invoice). Is this an intentional feature of this way of modeling the data?

Yes, this is fine - you'll need to continually join on InvoiceID and filter by it (on LineItem, InvoiceId should be a foreign key to Invoice, and on Invoice it will likely be a primary key, or at least a unique constraint)

We often have invoice level data like notes, discounts, shipping charges, etc. - How do we represent these using this method? Some discounts are product (I've assumed line) specific - so they belong on the line item anyway, others are invoice wide (think of a deal where you buy two separate products and receive a discount on the two) - we could we somehow allocate it across the line items? Same with shipping charges, allocate it by dividing it among the line items?

By 'often have' it seems that these data are optional and each invoice or line item can have several notes / discounts etc. These relationship will generally be modelled as separate tables, with foreign keys back to the associated invoice or line item. This way, you can have many notes, many discounts etc. You may want to introduce unique constraints on these tables to prevent more than one invoice having 2 of the same discount. One design option here is whether there is sufficient commonality between a line discount and an invoice discount to warrant a single table to model both parent/child, with an optional foreign key to either. Generally, I would err on the side of separating a specialized InvoiceDiscount and a LineDiscount table.

What do we do with invoice 'notes' - we have printed and/or internal notes, would we put the data in the line items and just repeat it for each line item? That seems to go against data normalization. Put it in a related table?

It sounds like the notes may be 'static data', e.g. a set of 50 standard comments, possibly codified. The note 'templates' should be modelled as a (e.g. NoteTemplate). You could then add a N:N junction table between LineItem to NoteTemplate. If there is optional free-flow commentary allowed here, this could go as an additional column on the junction table (although some ORMs frown on doing this).

Concerns

FWIW, I've delivered several retail systems, and all of the systems (off the shelf and bespoke) use this approach to modelling of invoices (and purchase orders, delivery notes etc).

It seems you may be used to a NoSql or single document / aggregate root approach to storage, and are have reservations about the large number of tables which can result from normalization? Although no doubt you could have one document for the "Invoice" aggregate root, the problem would come with querying the data (e.g. find me the sum of all sales of XYZ ToothPaste for sales on DD/MM/YYYY, especially on child nodes like Line Items or notes).

Implementation

For performance reasons, it is common to roll up the summation of nett, tax and gross of all child line items on the parent Invoice level as well. Although this is potentially redundant, it does have performance benefits over continually re-deriving this data, e.g. from a View or Computed column. Another performance consideration is that you will be often retrieving all the line items every time you fetch an invoice. As a result, it is common practice in Parent Child data modelling to use the parent InvoiceId as the Clustering Key on the child table (NB This is NOT the same as the Primary Key on the child, but you may choose to double up here, e.g. if a Line Item can only have one of each Product per Invoice, then InvoiceId, ProductId might be a good choice of both Clustering Key and Primary Key).

HTH

Edit

The Clustered Index for SqlServer and MySql relates to the physical storage of data - the clustering key (and fill factor) determines how records get stored on data pages. Oracle has a similar concept called Indexed Organized Tables (IOT).

In the case of parent-child relationships (such as Invoice to InvoiceLineItem) where it will be common to retrieve all children for a given parent Invoice, ensuring that as many children as possible are stored on the same physical page (and if more than one page is required, then on adjacent pages). This will minimize read IO.

I've put up a SqlServer SqlFiddle here which hopefully illustrates two approaches to clustering by the parent Invoice - one with the Details having a surrogate non clustered PK, and once with a composite PK to InvoiceID, ProductID.

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Great info on implementation, thanks. Clustering key on the child table is not clear to me though. Right now the InvoiceLineItems is just related back to Invoice through a foreign key relationship containing the primary key of the invoice. Are you saying I should index the InvoiceLineItems by the primary key of the Invoice rather than the primary key of the LineItem? That makes sense since we're always searching for LineItems that belong to a specific invoice. –  mikerrrrrr May 28 '14 at 23:03
    
I've updated with a Fiddle example and references, but yes, the objective is to minimize the read IO when retrieving all the line items for a given invoice. –  StuartLC May 29 '14 at 4:52

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