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I have some misunderstanding:

Let's mark default constructor of struct A as deleted:

struct A
{
  A() = delete;
};

The next instruction is well-formed and what's that effect?:

A a{};

From cppreference value initilization:

1) If T is a class type with no default constructor or with a user-provided default constructor or with a deleted default constructor, the object is default-initialized.

but then the effect of default initialization is:

If T is a class type, the default constructor is called to provide the initial value for the new object.

Or it's aggregate initialization? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
no, clang-3.5 and gcc-4.9 compiles it with -std=c++1y – Bikineev May 27 '14 at 6:33
2  
I would find that surprising. It looks like a breaking change. It has to be value initialization, and if it were well formed it would negate some of the reasons for having deleted special functions. – juanchopanza May 27 '14 at 6:42
2  
I'm looking at the latest draft, N3936 and don't see how this can compile. But you're right that both clang 3.4 and gcc-4.9 do compile it with -std=c++1y. gcc-4.8 doesn't and complains about the deleted constructor. – Praetorian May 27 '14 at 6:43
1  
Maybe with this scheme they want to provide a mean of POD only struct or something. – 101010 May 27 '14 at 6:47
1  
In all cases, if the empty pair of braces {} is used and T is an aggregate type, aggregate-initialization is performed instead of value-initialization. Your struct A is an (empty) aggregate. – Hubert Applebaum May 27 '14 at 6:49
up vote 27 down vote accepted

Your struct A is :

  • a class type that has:
    • no user-provided constructors1,
    • no private or protected non-static data members,
    • no base classes,
    • no virtual member functions.

It therefore qualifies as an aggregate type, according to the definition provided by § 8.5.1/1.

Then comes the priority of aggregate initialization over value initialization. The standard says that aggregate initialization has precedence over value intialization (draft N3936, § 8.5.4/3, page 201) (emphasis mine)

List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows:

  • If T is an aggregate, aggregate initialization is performed (8.5.1).
  • Otherwise, if the initializer list has no elements and T is a class type with a default constructor, the object is value-initialized.
  • [... more rules...]

(1) As requested in the comments on why a deleted constructor does not count as user-defined, here is what the standard says (draft N3936, § 8.4.2/5, page 198):

A function is user-provided if it is user-declared and not explicitly defaulted or deleted on its first declaration.

share|improve this answer
1  
"(explicitly defaulted or deleted constructors are allowed)".. says who? there lies the answer, so please quote the spec. – Nawaz May 27 '14 at 9:34
    
@Nawaz I have added a quote. – Hubert Applebaum May 27 '14 at 9:49
    
Note that the last bullet point in your "it is an aggregate" list does not apply in C++1y. – juanchopanza May 27 '14 at 9:54
    
@juanchopanza Yes indeed, thank you. – Hubert Applebaum May 27 '14 at 10:57

It is well formed. A is an aggregate1, and, according to draft N3936, an empty initializer list used in direct-list initialization of an aggregate results in aggregate initialization:

From § 8.5.4/3 List-initialization [dcl.init.list]:

List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows:

— If T is an aggregate, aggregate initialization is performed (8.5.1).

[ Example:

struct S2 { int m1; double m2, m3; };

....

S2 s23{}; // OK: default to 0,0,0

....

— end example ]

....

The relevant changes between C++11 and C++1y are a change in the precedence of aggregate vs. value initialization for the case of aggregates:

C++11 leads with

List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows:

— If the initializer list has no elements and T is a class type with a default constructor, the object is value-initialized.

— Otherwise, if T is an aggregate, aggregate initialization is performed (8.5.1)....

followed by the example above.

C++1y gives priority to aggregate initialization:

List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows:

— If T is an aggregate, aggregate initialization is performed (8.5.1).

....

— Otherwise, if the initializer list has no elements and T is a class type with a default constructor, the object is value-initialized.


1 Why is A an aggregate?

It is an aggregate both in C++11 and C++14.

C++1y:

8.5.1 Aggregates [dcl.init.aggr]

An aggregate is an array or a class (Clause 9) with no user-provided constructors (12.1), no private or protected non-static data members (Clause 11), no base classes (Clause 10), and no virtual functions (10.3).

The only part that is not obvious is whether the defaulted constructor is user-provided or not. It isn't:

In § 8.4.2 [dcl.fct.def.default]:

A function is user-provided if it is user-declared and not explicitly defaulted or deleted on its first declaration.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 It's the user provided clause that threw me off. I assumed explicitly defaulted/deleted constructor counted as user provided. – Praetorian May 27 '14 at 7:06
1  
+1 Oh come on, 30 seconds difference! – Hubert Applebaum May 27 '14 at 7:07
1  
"A is an aggregate". How exactly? Your quote should prove that first. – Nawaz May 27 '14 at 9:37
2  
@Nawaz I always have to look up this "user-provided" business. Hopefully I will remember it from now on. But it doesn't help that some compilers seem to get this wrong. – juanchopanza May 27 '14 at 10:02
2  
@Yakk yes, I tend to consider this a defect. Deleting the constructor was supposed to be the clean version of supplying a private, empty one... – Massa May 27 '14 at 20:43

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