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Inspired by http://xkcd.com/710/ here is a code golf for it.

The Challenge

Given a positive integer greater than 0, print out the hailstone sequence for that number.

The Hailstone Sequence

See Wikipedia for more detail..

  • If the number is even, divide it by two.
  • If the number is odd, triple it and add one.

Repeat this with the number produced until it reaches 1. (if it continues after 1, it will go in an infinite loop of 1 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1...)

Sometimes code is the best way to explain, so here is some from Wikipedia

function collatz(n)
  show n
  if n > 1
    if n is odd
      call collatz(3n + 1)
    else
      call collatz(n / 2)

This code works, but I am adding on an extra challenge. The program must not be vulnerable to stack overflows. So it must either use iteration or tail recursion.

Also, bonus points for if it can calculate big numbers and the language does not already have it implemented. (or if you reimplement big number support using fixed-length integers)

Test case

Number: 21
Results: 21 -> 64 -> 32 -> 16 -> 8 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1

Number: 3
Results: 3 -> 10 -> 5 -> 16 -> 8 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1

Also, the code golf must include full user input and output.

share|improve this question
4  
20  
must not be vulnerable to stack overflows : You should not have posted it here then! ;) –  Felix Kling Mar 5 '10 at 16:35
51  
My friends stopped calling me, does that mean I solved the problem? –  Martin Mar 5 '10 at 16:38
18  
You're on SO, but once had friends? ... what was that like? –  Pops Mar 5 '10 at 17:11
5  
The assembler answer is cool, but it's a bit anti-code-golf to select the longest answer! –  gnibbler Mar 6 '10 at 6:30

70 Answers 70

Ruby, 50 chars, no stack overflow

Basically a direct rip of makapuf's Python solution:

def c(n)while n>1;n=n.odd?? n*3+1: n/2;p n end end

Ruby, 45 chars, will overflow

Basically a direct rip of the code provided in the question:

def c(n)p n;n.odd?? c(3*n+1):c(n/2)if n>1 end
share|improve this answer
3  
You can save four characters with p n=[n/2,n*3+1][n%2] –  Wayne Conrad Mar 7 '10 at 15:00

C : 64 chars

main(x){for(scanf("%d",&x);x>=printf("%d,",x);x=x&1?3*x+1:x/2);}

With big integer support: 431 (necessary) chars

#include <stdlib.h>
#define B (w>=m?d=realloc(d,m=m+m):0)
#define S(a,b)t=a,a=b,b=t
main(m,w,i,t){char*d=malloc(m=9);for(w=0;(i=getchar()+2)/10==5;)
B,d[w++]=i%10;for(i=0;i<w/2;i++)S(d[i],d[w-i-1]);for(;;w++){
while(w&&!d[w-1])w--;for(i=w+1;i--;)putchar(i?d[i-1]+48:10);if(
w==1&&*d==1)break;if(*d&1){for(i=w;i--;)d[i]*=3;*d+=1;}else{
for(i=w;i-->1;)d[i-1]+=d[i]%2*10,d[i]/=2;*d/=2;}B,d[w]=0;for(i=0
;i<w;i++)d[i+1]+=d[i]/10,d[i]%=10;}}

Note: Do not remove #include <stdlib.h> without at least prototyping malloc/realloc, as doing so will not be safe on 64-bit platforms (64-bit void* will be converted to 32-bit int).

This one hasn't been tested vigorously yet. It could use some shortening as well.


Previous versions:

main(x){for(scanf("%d",&x);printf("%d,",x),x-1;x=x&1?3*x+1:x/2);} // 66

(removed 12 chars because no one follows the output format... :| )

share|improve this answer

Haskell : 50

c 1=[1];c n=n:(c$if odd n then 3*n+1 else n`div`2)
share|improve this answer
1  
I managed to shrink it to 41 (see comment by jkff's answer) –  sdcvvc Mar 6 '10 at 23:44

Perl : 31 chars

perl -nE 'say$_=$_%2?$_*3+1:$_/2while$_>1'
#         123456789 123456789 123456789 1234567

Edited to remove 2 unnecessary spaces.

Edited to remove 1 unnecessary space.

share|improve this answer
41  
Sometimes when I come across base64 encoded text, I sometimes mistake it for Perl source code. –  Martin Mar 5 '10 at 18:05
21  
@Martin:I can't imagine how you'd do that. Base64 is much more readable. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 5 '10 at 19:51

Python:

def collatz(n):
    if (n%2) == 0:
        return n/2
    else:
        return 3*n+1
def do_collatz(n):
    while n > 1:
        print n
        n = collatz(n)
    print n
do_collatz(int(input("Start number: ")))

Not vulnerable to stack overflows, but does not terminate on a sequence that does not converge on 1. (edit: forgot the input part)

share|improve this answer
3  
That is kind of the point ;) –  Josh Lee Mar 5 '10 at 17:34
14  
Well done Raceimaztion, now as a bonus challenge, simply prove that your program always terminates, or find an example where it doesn't. –  jsn Mar 5 '10 at 17:38
1  
@jsn, maybe I should make a code golf to find the number where it doesn't and see the people suffer :) –  Earlz Mar 5 '10 at 17:50
3  
I once read about a professor who puts such unsolved problems as questions on his final exams for some advanced class, and every once in a rare while a student solved one... –  rmeador Mar 5 '10 at 20:54
1  
@Kugel - prove it :) –  Yuval Adam Mar 7 '10 at 8:59

Perl, 59 characters:

sub c{print my$x="@_\n";@_=$x&1?$x*3+1:$x/2,goto&c if$x!=1}
share|improve this answer

Mathematica, 45 50 chars

c=NestWhileList[If[OddQ@#,3#+1,#/2]&,#,#>1&]&
share|improve this answer
2  
50 characters: c[n_]:=NestWhileList[If[OddQ@#,3#+1,#/2]&,n,#>1&] –  Michael Pilat Mar 6 '10 at 0:02

Python - 95 64 51 46 char

Obviously does not produce a stack overflow.

n=input()
while n>1:n=(n/2,n*3+1)[n%2];print n
share|improve this answer
2  
And this is why I love python! –  gahooa Mar 6 '10 at 1:20
4  
You might want to specify Python 2.x. IIRC, Python 3.x input doesn't do an eval. –  Mike D. Mar 6 '10 at 4:55
5  
This doesn't fulfil the requirements - it doesn't print the first number –  Ben Lings Mar 7 '10 at 17:45
7  
why is this accepted? it's not the shortest one and it doesn't print the first number –  Claudiu Mar 8 '10 at 6:25
17  
You can print the first number for a cost of only 2 bytes by using n=input()*2 –  gnibbler Mar 12 '10 at 1:40

x86 assembly, 1337 characters

;
; To assemble and link this program, just run:
;
; >> $ nasm -f elf collatz.asm && gcc -o collatz collatz.o
;
; You can then enjoy its output by passing a number to it on the command line:
;
; >> $ ./collatz 123
; >> 123 --> 370 --> 185 --> 556 --> 278 --> 139 --> 418 --> 209 --> 628 --> 314
; >> --> 157 --> 472 --> 236 --> 118 --> 59 --> 178 --> 89 --> 268 --> 134 --> 67
; >> --> 202 --> 101 --> 304 --> 152 --> 76 --> 38 --> 19 --> 58 --> 29 --> 88
; >> --> 44 --> 22 --> 11 --> 34 --> 17 --> 52 --> 26 --> 13 --> 40 --> 20 --> 10
; >> --> 5 --> 16 --> 8 --> 4 --> 2 --> 1
; 
; There's even some error checking involved:
; >> $ ./collatz
; >> Usage: ./collatz NUMBER
;
section .text
global main
extern printf
extern atoi

main:

  cmp dword [esp+0x04], 2
  jne .usage

  mov ebx, [esp+0x08]
  push dword [ebx+0x04]
  call atoi
  add esp, 4

  cmp eax, 0
  je .usage

  mov ebx, eax
  push eax
  push msg

.loop:
  mov [esp+0x04], ebx
  call printf

  test ebx, 0x01
  jz .even

.odd:
  lea ebx, [1+ebx*2+ebx]
  jmp .loop

.even:

  shr ebx, 1
  cmp ebx, 1
  jne .loop

  push ebx
  push end
  call printf

  add esp, 16
  xor eax, eax
  ret

.usage:
  mov ebx, [esp+0x08]
  push dword [ebx+0x00]
  push usage
  call printf
  add esp, 8
  mov eax, 1
  ret

msg db "%d --> ", 0
end db "%d", 10, 0
usage db "Usage: %s NUMBER", 10, 0
share|improve this answer
87  
+1 for 1337 characters :p –  KennyTM Mar 5 '10 at 17:47
27  
x86 asm and 1337 chars. I weep with joy. –  ZoogieZork Mar 5 '10 at 18:06
10  
I like the (ab)use of lea for 3n+1. –  wowest Mar 5 '10 at 22:40

Haskell, 62 chars 63 76 83, 86, 97, 137

c 1=[1]
c n=n:c(div(n`mod`2*(5*n+2)+n)2)
main=readLn>>=print.c

User input, printed output, uses constant memory and stack, works with arbitrarily big integers.

A sample run of this code, given an 80 digit number of all '1's (!) as input, is pretty fun to look at.


Original, function only version:

Haskell 51 chars

f n=n:[[],f([n`div`2,3*n+1]!!(n`mod`2))]!!(1`mod`n)

Who the @&^# needs conditionals, anyway?

(edit: I was being "clever" and used fix. Without it, the code dropped to 54 chars. edit2: dropped to 51 by factoring out f())

share|improve this answer
5  
+1. Nice trick with the list indexing to branch on n`mod`2. Jump tables in Haskell. Never thought I'd see that. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 5 '10 at 20:25
1  
Using jleedev's idea: c 1=[1];c n=n:(c$div(nmod`2*(5*n+2)+n)2)` - 41 characters, this uses the fact that this is k*(3n+1)+(1-k)*n/2 where k=n mod 2 –  sdcvvc Mar 6 '10 at 23:49
2  
I deleted my other entry, and moved my code here, and incorporated yet more of the ideas from these comments. Increased to 76 characters, but does input and output. –  MtnViewMark Mar 8 '10 at 14:52

Befunge

&>:.:1-|
  >3*^ @
  |%2: <
 v>2/>+
share|improve this answer
18  
Does this work? Holy macaroni. –  Beska Mar 5 '10 at 22:19
3  
what is this "thing" ? –  xxxxxxx Mar 7 '10 at 8:29
1  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Befunge check it out. It's pretty intense –  WarmWaffles Mar 7 '10 at 22:29
2  
You should read this in 2D. <>^v are arrows that change direction the "program counter" wanders. | and _ are conditionals that go up/down or left/right depending on whether the value on stack is true or false. The whole "code arena" wraps around through top-bottom and left-right. –  SF. Mar 10 '10 at 10:18
6  
Are you sure it's not Perl? –  ijw Jan 7 '11 at 2:21

MS Excel, 35 chars

=IF(A1/2=ROUND(A1/2,0),A1/2,A1*3+1)

Taken straight from Wikipedia:

In cell A1, place the starting number.
In cell A2 enter this formula =IF(A1/2=ROUND(A1/2,0),A1/2,A1*3+1) 
Drag and copy the formula down until 4, 2, 1

It only took copy/pasting the formula 111 times to get the result for a starting number of 1000. ;)

share|improve this answer
16  
I guess it's too late for me to point out that this is what the fill handle is for, huh? ehow.com/how_2284668_use-fill-handle-microsoft-excel.html :) –  Jordan Mar 5 '10 at 18:34
2  
wow, you are elite excel programmers ! –  xxxxxxx Mar 7 '10 at 8:35

Golfscript : 20 chars

  ~{(}{3*).1&5*)/}/1+`
# 
# Usage: echo 21 | ruby golfscript.rb collatz.gs

This is equivalent to

stack<int> s;
s.push(21);
while (s.top() - 1) {
  int x = s.top();
  int numerator = x*3+1;
  int denominator = (numerator&1) * 5 + 1;
  s.push(numerator/denominator);
}
s.push(1);
return s;
share|improve this answer
2  
"must include full user input and output" –  F'x Mar 7 '10 at 14:28
2  
@FX: Except this is the only way Golfscript accepts input. –  KennyTM Mar 7 '10 at 15:07
2  
@FX, replacing the 21 with ~ will cause the program to use a number from stdin –  gnibbler Mar 8 '10 at 21:06

Ruby, 43 characters

bignum supported, with stack overflow susceptibility:

def c(n)p n;n%2>0?c(3*n+1):c(n/2)if n>1 end

...and 50 characters, bignum supported, without stack overflow:

def d(n)while n>1 do p n;n=n%2>0?3*n+1:n/2 end end

Kudos to Jordan. I didn't know about 'p' as a replacement for puts.

share|improve this answer

F#, 90 characters

let c=Seq.unfold(function|n when n<=1->None|n when n%2=0->Some(n,n/2)|n->Some(n,(3*n)+1))

> c 21;;
val it : seq<int> = seq [21; 64; 32; 16; ...]

Or if you're not using F# interactive to display the result, 102 characters:

let c=Seq.unfold(function|n when n<=1->None|n when n%2=0->Some(n,n/2)|n->Some(n,(3*n)+1))>>printf"%A"
share|improve this answer

MATLAB 7.8.0 (R2009a): 58 characters

n=input('');while n>1,n=n/2+rem(n,2)*(n*5+2)/2;disp(n);end

Test case:

>> n=input('');while n>1,n=n/2+rem(n,2)*(n*5+2)/2;disp(n);end
21
    64
    32
    16
     8
     4
     2
     1
share|improve this answer
1  
Hey gnovice, we can avoid the disp(n), with: n=input('');while n>1,n=n/2+rem(n,2)*(n*5+2)/2,end --- *50 characters! –  Jacob Mar 18 '10 at 14:54

C#: 216 Characters

using C=System.Console;class P{static void Main(){var p="start:";System.Action<object> o=C.Write;o(p);ulong i;while(ulong.TryParse(C.ReadLine(),out i)){o(i);while(i > 1){i=i%2==0?i/2:i*3+1;o(" -> "+i);}o("\n"+p);}}}

in long form:

using C = System.Console;
class P
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var p = "start:"; 
        System.Action<object> o = C.Write; 
        o(p); 
        ulong i; 
        while (ulong.TryParse(C.ReadLine(), out i))
        {
            o(i); 
            while (i > 1)
            {
                i = i % 2 == 0 ? i / 2 : i * 3 + 1; 
                o(" -> " + i);
            } 
            o("\n" + p);
        }
    }
}

New Version, accepts one number as input provided through the command line, no input validation. 173 154 characters.

using System;class P{static void Main(string[]a){Action<object>o=Console.Write;var i=ulong.Parse(a[0]);o(i);while(i>1){i=i%2==0?i/2:i*3+1;o(" -> "+i);}}}

in long form:

using System;
class P
{
    static void Main(string[]a)
    {
        Action<object>o=Console.Write;
        var i=ulong.Parse(a[0]);
        o(i);
        while(i>1)
        {
            i=i%2==0?i/2:i*3+1;
            o(" -> "+i);
        }
    }
}

I am able to shave a few characters by ripping off the idea in this answer to use a for loop rather than a while. 150 characters.

using System;class P{static void Main(string[]a){Action<object>o=Console.Write;for(var i=ulong.Parse(a[0]);i>1;i=i%2==0?i/2:i*3+1)o(i+" -> ");o(1);}}
share|improve this answer

Common Lisp, 141 characters:

(defun c ()
  (format t"Number: ")
  (loop for n = (read) then (if(oddp n)(+ 1 n n n)(/ n 2))
     until (= n 1)
     do (format t"~d -> "n))
  (format t"1~%"))

Test run:

Number: 171
171 -> 514 -> 257 -> 772 -> 386 -> 193 -> 580 -> 290 -> 145 -> 436 ->
218 -> 109 -> 328 -> 164 -> 82 -> 41 -> 124 -> 62 -> 31 -> 94 -> 47 ->
142 -> 71 -> 214 -> 107 -> 322 -> 161 -> 484 -> 242 -> 121 -> 364 ->
182 -> 91 -> 274 -> 137 -> 412 -> 206 -> 103 -> 310 -> 155 -> 466 ->
233 -> 700 -> 350 -> 175 -> 526 -> 263 -> 790 -> 395 -> 1186 -> 593 ->
1780 -> 890 -> 445 -> 1336 -> 668 -> 334 -> 167 -> 502 -> 251 -> 754 ->
377 -> 1132 -> 566 -> 283 -> 850 -> 425 -> 1276 -> 638 -> 319 ->
958 -> 479 -> 1438 -> 719 -> 2158 -> 1079 -> 3238 -> 1619 -> 4858 ->
2429 -> 7288 -> 3644 -> 1822 -> 911 -> 2734 -> 1367 -> 4102 -> 2051 ->
6154 -> 3077 -> 9232 -> 4616 -> 2308 -> 1154 -> 577 -> 1732 -> 866 ->
433 -> 1300 -> 650 -> 325 -> 976 -> 488 -> 244 -> 122 -> 61 -> 184 ->
92 -> 46 -> 23 -> 70 -> 35 -> 106 -> 53 -> 160 -> 80 -> 40 -> 20 ->
10 -> 5 -> 16 -> 8 -> 4 -> 2 -> 1 
share|improve this answer

Based on ar's code, here's a perl version which actually conforms to the output requirements

perl -E 'print"Number: ";$_=<STDIN>;chomp;print"Results: $_";$_=$_%2?$_*3+1:$_/2,print" -> ",$_ while$_!=1;say""'

Length: 114 counting the perl invocation and quotes, 104 withouit

I'm sure some experienced golfer can reduce this crude version further.

share|improve this answer

Scheme: 72

(define(c n)(if(= n 1)`(1)(cons n(if(odd? n)(c(+(* n 3)1))(c(/ n 2))))))

This uses recursion, but the calls are tail-recursive so I think they'll be optimized to iteration. In some quick testing, I haven't been able to find a number for which the stack overflows anyway. Just for example:

(c 9876543219999999999000011234567898888777766665555444433332222 7777777777777777777777777777777798797657657651234143375987342987 5398709812374982529830983743297432985230985739287023987532098579 058095873098753098370938753987)

...runs just fine. [that's all one number -- I've just broken it to fit on screen.]

share|improve this answer
import java.math.BigInteger;
public class SortaJava {

    static final BigInteger THREE = new BigInteger("3");
    static final BigInteger TWO = new BigInteger("2");

    interface BiFunc<R, A, B> {
      R call(A a, B b);
    }

    interface Cons<A, B> {
      <R> R apply(BiFunc<R, A, B> func);
    }

    static class Collatz implements Cons<BigInteger, Collatz> {
      BigInteger value;
      public Collatz(BigInteger value) { this.value = value; }
      public <R> R apply(BiFunc<R, BigInteger, Collatz> func) {
        if(BigInteger.ONE.equals(value))
          return func.call(value, null);
        if(value.testBit(0))
          return func.call(value, new Collatz((value.multiply(THREE)).add(BigInteger.ONE)));
        return func.call(value, new Collatz(value.divide(TWO)));
      }
    }

    static class PrintAReturnB<A, B> implements BiFunc<B, A, B> {
      boolean first = true;
      public B call(A a, B b) {
        if(first)
          first = false;
        else
          System.out.print(" -> ");
        System.out.print(a);
        return b;
      }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
      BiFunc<Collatz, BigInteger, Collatz> printer = new PrintAReturnB<BigInteger, Collatz>();
      Collatz collatz = new Collatz(new BigInteger(args[0]));
      while(collatz != null)
        collatz = collatz.apply(printer);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
50  
Java: the language where you have to use BigIntegers just to count the number of characters in the code of the solution. –  Jared Updike Mar 5 '10 at 19:52
3  
@Jared I totally agree that Java is verbose. You have to admit that the solution presented a) meets the requirements b) is way longer than really necessary and c) plays with the java type system in a pleasing way –  wowest Mar 5 '10 at 22:33
1  
:-) Pretty cool use of generics. –  Jared Updike Mar 6 '10 at 0:05
1  
omfg, I pray I never have to use that monstrosity. –  Kugel Mar 7 '10 at 0:25

C#, 88 chars I think. Recursive

void T(int i,string s){Console.Write("{0}{1}",s,i);if(i!=1)T(i%2==0?i/2:(i*3)+ 1,"->");}

Plus this initial call

T(171, "");

Here is a non-recursive method, 107 chars I think

void T2(int i){string s="";while(i>=1){Console.Write("{0}{1}",s,i);i=i==1?-1:i=i%2==0?i/2:(i*3)+1;s="->";}}
share|improve this answer
6  
Plus using statements, plus a class definition, plus a Main method, plus a Console.ReadLine call, plus an int.Parse or long.Parse or ulong.Parse call. You need a full program with full user input and output.. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 5 '10 at 20:53

VB.Net, about 180 characters

Sub Main()
    Dim q = New Queue(Of Integer)
    q.Enqueue(CInt(Console.ReadLine))
    Do
        q.Enqueue(CInt(If(q.Peek Mod 2 = 0, q.Dequeue / 2, q.Dequeue * 3 + 1)))
        Console.WriteLine(q.Peek)
    Loop Until q.Peek = 1
End Sub

funny thing is converting this code into c# create more characters

to make it work in an empty .vb file (about 245 characters)

Imports System.Collections.Generic
Imports System
Module m
    Sub Main()
        Dim q = New Queue(Of Integer)
        q.Enqueue(CInt(Console.ReadLine))
        Do
            q.Enqueue(CInt(If(q.Peek Mod 2 = 0, q.Dequeue / 2, q.Dequeue * 3 + 1)))
            Console.WriteLine(q.Peek)
        Loop Until q.Peek = 1
    End Sub
End Module
share|improve this answer

not the shortest, but an elegant clojure solution

(defn collatz [n]
 (print n "")
 (if (> n 1)
  (recur
   (if (odd? n)
    (inc (* 3 n))
    (/ n 2)))))
share|improve this answer

bc 41 chars

I guess this kind of problems is what bc was invented for:

for(n=read();n>1;){if(n%2)n=n*6+2;n/=2;n}

Test:

bc1 -q collatz.bc
21
64
32
16
8
4
2
1

Proper code:

for(n=read();n>1;){if(n%2)n=n*3+1else n/=2;print n,"\n"}

bc handles numbers with up to INT_MAX digits

Edit: The Wikipedia article mentions this conjecture has been checked for all values up to 20x258 (aprox. 5.76e18). This program:

c=0;for(n=2^20000+1;n>1;){if(n%2)n=n*6+2;n/=2;c+=1};n;c

tests 220,000+1 (aprox. 3.98e6,020) in 68 seconds, 144,404 cycles.

share|improve this answer
4  
Here's a command line for generating random arbitrary-length numbers for this entry (10000 digits in this case): cat /dev/urandom | tr -dc '0-9' | head -c 10000 | bc collatz-conjecture.bc –  indiv Mar 5 '10 at 22:18
3  
@indiv - I had to test it :), it took 3 minutes and 12 seconds to process the 10,000 digits number. I saved the output to a file, it's about 1.2gb long, but yes it did finish correctly in 1. Point for bc –  Carlos Gutiérrez Mar 5 '10 at 22:34

C++ 113 100 95

#include <iostream>
int main(int i){for(std::cin>>i;i>1;i=i&1?i*3+1:i/2)std::cout<<i<<" -> ";}
share|improve this answer

Miranda (101 characters)

c n=" 1",if n=1
   =" "++shownum(n)++c(n*3+1),if n mod 2=1
   =" "++shownum(n)++c(n div 2),otherwise

(whitespace is syntactically important)

share|improve this answer

Using an extension of HQ9+ (that I haven't written yet), called HQ9+C where C prints the Collatz Sequence on a number taken from stdin.

C

:P

share|improve this answer
10  
Why does someone do this every code golf? It was funny once. –  snicker Mar 5 '10 at 23:26
1  
I'm sorry that I haven't memorized the entirety of StackOverflow like you apparently have. –  Robert Davis Mar 6 '10 at 0:11
1  
Some [] jokes are funny once. Do it once, you're a wit; do it twice you're a half-wit. -Robert Heinlein in the voice of Manny –  dmckee Mar 6 '10 at 2:02

PHP

function Collatz($n)
{
        $i = 0;
    while($n>1)
    {
        if($n % 2)
        {
            $n = (3*$n) + 1;
            $i++;
            echo "step $i:  $n <br/>";
        }

        else 
        {
            $n = $n/2;
            $i++;
            echo "step $i:  $n <br/>";
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Dont be hard on yourself. You wont learn unless you contrib and get feedback. Check the PHP answer above for a shorter way to do it. –  Christian Jun 6 '10 at 10:06

Powershell : 80 characters

One-liner:

"Results: $(for($x=read-host Number;1%$x;$x=@($x/2;3*$x+1)[$x%2]){""$x ->""}) 1"

Pretty-printed:

"Results: $( for( $x = read-host Number; 1%$x; $x = @( $x/2; 3*$x+1 )[ $x%2 ] )
             { 
                 ""$x ->"" 
             }
           ) 1"

Without input prompt and output formatting - 44 characters:

for($x=read-host;1%$x;$x=@($x/2;3*$x+1)[$x%2]){$x}1
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