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I am writing a LinQ query in MVC to return ranks of students based on their scores like so

// Merge the LB lists to get aggregated List, allot dummy rank(0)
var a = leaderboard.ToDictionary((kvp => kvp.Key),
(kvp => kvp.Value.leaderboard)).Values.SelectMany(x => x).GroupBy(student => student.stId).Select(
g => new Leaderboard { 
stId = g.Key, 
stName = g.Select(x => x.stName).First(), 
rank = 0, 
score = g.Select(x => x.score).Sum(), 
cName = g.Select(x => x.cName).First() 
});

// Arrange the records in descending order of scores for rank
lbList = a.ToList().OrderByDescending(q => q.score).ToList();
int rank = 1;
lbList = lbList.Select(c => { c.rank = rank++; return c; }).ToList();

But for the same scores ,this returns different ranks. Seeing as score is the only parameter without a time component, how do I change this to return same ranks for same scores?

share|improve this question
2  
SelectMany(x => x)? What is the point of this? –  Sergey Krusch May 27 at 7:52

2 Answers 2

Create a distinct collection of scores in an ordered sequence then use the position of the current student's score in the collection as his rank:

var UniqueScores = a.OrderByDescending(x=>x.score).Select(x=>x.score).Distinct().ToArray;
lbList = lbList.Select(c => { c.rank = (UniqueScores.IndexOf(c.score) + 1); return c; }).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
The matter is that if the three first student is scored 45,45,36 the third student will be ranked as 2. You should remove Distinct() to make it ok. –  Haga R. May 27 at 8:03
    
The requirement is ambiguous on this point. But what you say is fair. –  Juann Strauss May 27 at 8:09

Preamble

This code looks quite suspicious:

var a = leaderboard.ToDictionary((kvp => kvp.Key),
(kvp => kvp.Value.leaderboard)).Values.SelectMany(x => x).GroupBy(student => student.stId).Select(
g => new Leaderboard { 
stId = g.Key, 
stName = g.Select(x => x.stName).First(), 
rank = 0, 
score = g.Select(x => x.score).Sum(), 
cName = g.Select(x => x.cName).First() 
});
  1. SelectMany(x => x). What is the point of this? It just does nothing.
  2. g.Select(x => x.cName).First(). It's not optimal and less readable than this: g.First().cName.
  3. ToDictionary... Again, does nothing in your case since you end up using only Values.

So, I would rewrite it like this:

var a = leaderboard.
    Select(x => x.Value.leaderboard).
    GroupBy(student => student.stId).
    Select(
        g => new Leaderboard { 
            stId = g.Key, 
            stName = g.First().stName,
            rank = 0, 
            score = g.Sum(x => x.score),
            cName = g.First().cName});

Ranking

One thing to consider. Your code ends with ToList(). If you want to have List<> as output, then simple for loop is the best solution in my opinion:

var lbList = a.OrderByDescending(x => x.score);
int rank = 1;
for (int i = 0; i < lbList.Count; ++i)
{
    if (i > 0 && lbList[i - 1].score != lbList[i].score)
        ++rank;
    lbList[i].rank = rank;
}

If you need to have lbList as IEnumerable<> then:

var lbList = a.
    GroupBy(q => q.score).
    OrderByDescending(g => g.Key).
    SelectMany(
        (group, index) => group.Select(s => {
            s.rank = index + 1;
            return s;
        });
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Let me get back on this –  Slartibartfast May 27 at 8:58
    
You know... I have just realized that I have understood your question wrong. So, ranking section of my answer is not correct now :) Give me some time to fix it –  Sergey Krusch May 27 at 9:02
    
Not a problem :) –  Slartibartfast May 27 at 9:04
    
Here it is. Needs testing though :) –  Sergey Krusch May 27 at 9:42

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