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In the following examples:

  • the first seems more verbose but less wasteful of resources
  • the second is less verbose but more wasteful of resources (redefines string each loop)

Which is better coding practice?

First example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace TestForeach23434
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<string> names = new List<string> { "one", "two", "two", "three", "four", "four" };

            string test1 = "";
            string test2 = "";
            string test3 = "";
            foreach (var name in names)
            {
                test1 = name + "1";
                test2 = name + "2";
                test3 = name + "3";
                Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}, {2}", test1, test2, test3);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Second example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace TestForeach23434
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<string> names = new List<string> { "one", "two", "two", "three", "four", "four" };

            foreach (var name in names)
            {
                string test1 = name + "1";
                string test2 = name + "2";
                string test3 = name + "3";
                Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}, {2}", test1, test2, test3);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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4  
What do you mean, "wasteful"? The first one seems more wasteful, since it initializes the variables to values that will never be used. –  John Saunders Mar 5 '10 at 17:25
    
Wasteful in what sense? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 5 '10 at 17:25
2  
@aip.cd.aish - The exact same objects are being created in both examples. Only the variable lifetimes are different. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 5 '10 at 17:42
1  
@aip.cd.aish - That is correct (except that objects are not destroyed in the loop--only created). It relates to the immutability of strings only in the sense that the + operator in the above code actually does create a new instance of a string object, which may not be obvious. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 5 '10 at 18:21
2  
What "resources" are you speaking of? I don't understand what you mean by "resources", so it is hard to answer the question about "resources". The question about style is clear: place the local declaration such that the scope of the declared variable is the lexically smallest scope that guarantees that the variable's contents have the correct lifetime. –  Eric Lippert Mar 5 '10 at 20:44

11 Answers 11

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The second form is no more wasteful - it's simply better.

There's no advantage to declaring the variables outside the loop, unless you want to maintain their values between iterations.

(Note that usually this makes no behavioural difference, but that's not true if the variables are being captured by a lambda expression or anonymous method.)

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3  
but if my foreach loop interates a million times, don't I take a performance hit by defining 3 million strings instead of 3 strings? –  Edward Tanguay Mar 5 '10 at 17:29
12  
You are still creating three million strings because String is an immutable type. When you do string + "1" you are effectively creating a brand new String object and assigning it to something, not modifying the original. –  Josh Mar 5 '10 at 17:31
3  
You get the same hit either way. If performance is the issue, then use a StringBuilder which is mutable and is actually reused. –  user16324 Mar 5 '10 at 17:31
3  
@Edwad Tanguay, behind the scene, space for a variable is only created once for the function, and reused for every iteration. Even more exact, the underlying layer has no notion of scoping and loops besides function and class scope. And string concatenation in a loop is never good, use StringBuilder as those above told. –  Dykam Mar 5 '10 at 17:45
1  
But more generally, Jon, for other object types, the addresses would be reused (in case B), correct? Even if the objects are modified within the loop. –  harpo Mar 5 '10 at 18:25

Personally, I think it's the best practice to declare variables in the tightest scope possible, given their usage.

This provides many benefits:

  1. It's easier for refactoring, since extracting a method is simpler when the variables are already in the same scope.
  2. The variable usage is more clear, which will lead to more reliable code.

The only (potential) disadvantage would be the extra variable declaration - however, the JIT tends to optimize this issue away, so it's one I wouldn't necessarily worry about in real work.

The one exception to this:

If your variable is going to be adding a lot of GC pressure, and if this can be avoided by reusing the same object instance through the foreach/for loop, and if the GC pressure is causing measured performance problems, I'd lift it into the outer scope.

share|improve this answer
    
You had me right up to that last paragraph. Object lifetime is an entirely different question from variable lifetime. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 5 '10 at 17:37
    
@Jeffrey: Yes - and I wasn't talking about his specific example here, where it makes no (technical) difference. However, I was trying to say there are times when moving a variable into an outer scope can be a valid means of changing the object lifetime, to prevent adding unneeded system pressure due to repeated allocations. –  Reed Copsey Mar 5 '10 at 17:42
1  
If a variable initialization allocates a new object on the heap, then moving that outside a loop could create fewer objects, but that is not the same as moving the variable declaration, or changing the variable's scope. There is a related issue with regards to GC pressure and variable scope, but it has the opposite effect than what you describe. A variable declared outside the loop has an expanded scope that may increase an object's lifetime unless the static analysis notes that the variable is not used after the loop completes. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 5 '10 at 17:56
    
@Jeffrey: That was specifically why I included, in that statement: "can be avoided by reusing the same object instance through ..." I was making a general statement, in regards to my initial statement where I said to "declare variables in the tightest scope possible" - sometimes, moving to a larger scope means you can reuse a variable without reinitializing it, which can prevent multiple allocations from occurring (at the cost of having the object lifetime lengthened). –  Reed Copsey Mar 5 '10 at 18:06

Those are both wasteful and verbose.

foreach (var name in names)
{
   Console.WriteLine("{0}1, {0}2, {0}3", name);
}

.

</tongueincheek>
share|improve this answer
21  
Actually, Console.WriteLine("{0}1, {0}2, {0}3", name) would be my preference. –  Michael Myers Mar 5 '10 at 17:35
    
+1 for that...! –  womp Mar 5 '10 at 17:42

Depending on language and compiler it may or may not be the same. For C# I expect the resulting code to be very similar.

My own philosophy on this is simple:

Optimize for ease of understanding.

Anything else is premature optimization! The biggest bottleneck in most development is time and attention of the developer. If you absolutely must squeeze out every last CPU cycle then by all means do so, but unless you have a compelling business need to do or are writing a critical component (common library, operating system kernel, etc) you are better off waiting until you can benchmark the finished program. At that time optimizing a few of the most costly routines is justified, before then it's almost certainly a waste of time.

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I agree with your statement, but when dealing with a loop you much consider the performance impact of your code. There is another question here, where re-initializing several variables in nested loop is taking thirty seconds. –  AMissico Mar 5 '10 at 17:34
1  
While I agree with the general point, I'd argue that optimizing for correctness is right up there with ease of understanding. So I'd ask "which one is easier to read" and "which one is less likely to cause weird side effects when modified in the future" well before "which is faster". –  kyoryu Mar 5 '10 at 23:55

I'm not sure what you gain by defining the string variable outside of the loop. Strings are immutable so they are not reused. Whenever you assign to them, a new instance is created.

share|improve this answer
1  
Interned strings are re-used -- of course, the calculated strings in this example will not be interned by default, so I take your point. –  Eric Lippert Mar 5 '10 at 20:49
    
Thank you for the clarification. –  user16324 Mar 8 '10 at 16:03

I think it depends on what you are trying to solve. I like the second example, because you can move the code in one step. I like the first example, because it is faster due to less stack manipulations, less memory fragmentation, and less object construction/creation.

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I've found that 'hoisting' declarations out of loops is typically a better long-term strategy for maintenance. The compiler will usually sort things out acceptably for performance.

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They are both virtually the same as far as performance goes (strings are immutable), but as for readability... I'd say neither is very good. You could easily just do it all within the Console.WriteLine.

Perhaps you can post the real problem instead of an example?

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I generally declare variables as close to their use as scoping allows, which in this case would be your second example. Resharper tends to encourage this style as well.

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For POD type data declare closest to first use. For anything like a class that does any memory allocation, then you should consider declaring those outside of any loops. Strings will almost certainly do some form of allocation and most implementations (at least in C++) will attempt to reuse memory if possible. Heap based allocations can be very slow indeed.

I once profiled a bit of C++ code that included a class that new'd data in its ctor. With the variable declared outside of the loop it ran 17% faster than with the variable declared inside the loop. YMMV in C# so profile performance you may be very surprised at the results.

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Follow a simple rule while declaring variables

Declare it when you need it for the first time

share|improve this answer
2  
Unless you're using C, pre-C99. –  Michael Myers Mar 5 '10 at 17:34
3  
I have found that using that principle is fine until you have larger-scale software: having a centralized place to find your variable decls becomes useful in maintenance. –  Paul Nathan Mar 5 '10 at 17:37
6  
@Paul Nathan - If you are having trouble finding where a variable is declared in a method, then your method is way, way too long! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 5 '10 at 18:05
    
@Jeffrey: I think Paul's point stands when you're talking about private member variables in a class. –  Jacob G Mar 5 '10 at 18:07
1  
@Paul I don't see how that offers any value, IMO that actually lowers debuggability because you might have to watch the variable from line 1 of the method instead just 3 lines before the end of the method. And I feel sorry for you about not being able to fix bad code I worked at a position like that I'm glad I'm in charge now at my current one and I always subscribe to fix things when you touch them. –  Chris Marisic Mar 5 '10 at 18:26

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