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I have regular expression, "((?:\d*\.)?\d+)", and I want to get all numbers in different capture groups.

Something like this:

String sInput  = "20004 8 19 0 1 25. 1. 0. 0. 8 8 6366. 305.4 305.4 15915 8 4 25. 0."
String sRegExDef="((?:\d*\.)?\d+)";

MatchCollection matches = Regex.Matches(sInput, sRegExDef, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

matches[0].Value="20004";
matches[1].Value="8";
matches[2].Value="19";
.
.
.
matches[n].Value="...";

What I am looking for is a way to get the numbers in different capture groups.

share|improve this question
    
do you want the numbers after the dot? –  faby May 27 '14 at 12:17
    
What is your result? Because on Regexhero, your regex seems to work. –  Kilazur May 27 '14 at 12:19
    
I do not know how reliable Regexhero is but my C# project gets only one match (with the same configuratin). –  Mehdi May 27 '14 at 14:24
    
In Regexhero the Matches got all the same Group name what in my opinion means there are in the same Matching Group and thats the problem. –  Mehdi May 27 '14 at 14:50

2 Answers 2

You can do it like this:

string[] matches = Regex.Split(sInput, @"[^\d.]+");

.NET Fiddle

share|improve this answer
1  
You must exclude the dot from your character class: [^\d.]+ –  Casimir et Hippolyte May 27 '14 at 12:13
1  
You only have 1 match! –  Franky May 27 '14 at 12:17
    
Thank you both. Fixed –  Itay May 27 '14 at 12:19
    
Thanks for the idea but the split method is not an option for my current problem. Not all strings that I have to read in are number based. –  Mehdi May 27 '14 at 14:18
    
i´m going to do a work around (if(match) => Split =>if(mach ok) => do something) because i haven't find a solution so far. But if there are some other ideas i would be glad to hear them^^ thanks to all^^ –  Mehdi May 27 '14 at 17:41

if you want every number (numbers after dots included as new numbers)

 String sRegExDef=@"((?:\d*)?\d+)";
share|improve this answer
    
Why not, but in this case, you can simplify the pattern to: \d+ –  Casimir et Hippolyte May 27 '14 at 13:08
    
It is possible to get the numbers after the whitespace? –  Mehdi May 27 '14 at 14:25

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