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I wrote the following script just to see what happens when a variable and a function that has a function assigned to it have their names clash:

var f = function() {
    console.log("Me original.");
}

function f() {
    console.log("Me duplicate.");
}

f();

The output I'm getting is "Me original." Why was the other function not called?

Also, if I change my original assignment to var f = new function() {, I get "Me original", followed by a TypeError saying object is not a function. Can someone please explain?

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26  
@Dean.DePue — There's no confusion on JavaScript's part. The rules for handling them are quite clear (and explained by Benjamin in his answer). –  Quentin May 27 at 12:28
4  
Curiosity, still the best way to learn about a language. :-D –  Cerbrus May 27 at 12:28
2  
Also, I imagine it's pretty impossible for something as immaterial as "JavaScript" to "feel" confused (or any emotion, for that matter) ;-) –  Cerbrus May 27 at 12:30
2  
@Quentin thanks, I knew that just couldn't explain it well enough. –  Dean.DePue May 27 at 12:30
5  
Steps for growing in knowledge of javascript: 1) Use 'use strict' 2) Always use either jslint or jshint 3) Look up the things that jslint or jshint complains about 4) Rinse and repeat –  steve-er-rino May 30 at 17:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 154 down vote accepted

Function declarations are hoisted (moved to the top) in JavaScript. While incorrect in terms of parsing order, the code you have is semantically the same as the following since function declarations are hoisted:

function f() {
    console.log("Me duplicate.");
}
var f = function() {
    console.log("Me original.");
}


f();

Which in turn, with the exception of the function's name is the same as:

var f = function() {
    console.log("Me duplicate.");
}
var f = function() {
    console.log("Me original.");
}


f();

Which in turn, because of variable hoisting is the same as:

var f;
f = function() {
    console.log("Me duplicate.");
}
f = function() {
    console.log("Me original.");
}

f();

Which explains what you're getting, you're overriding the function. More generally, multiple var declarations are allowed in JavaScript - var x = 3; var x = 5 is perfectly legal. In the new ECMAScript 6 standard, let statements forbid this as well as normal var statements in ES5 strict mode.

This article by @kangax does a fantastic job in demystifying functions in javascript

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2  
Can you really simplify function f() to var f = function() that much? Are hoisting and function names really the only difference? –  djechlin May 27 at 12:28
6  
@djechlin in the context of this question - yes. Generally, it's more subtle - see stackoverflow.com/questions/336859/… . From the compiler perspective, they're different - but from the programmer perspective - we're close enough to it to claim that. That's why I added that long "while incorrect in terms of parsing order, the code you have is semantically the same as" instead of saying "is the same as". Good point. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 27 at 12:30
1  
@dotslash please do not edit your original question and change it, that's considered bad mannered here - also, mixing several questions in one is also considered bad mannered here. You can ask a new question instead or, if you think it's too minor, ask for clarification in the comments (that's what they're for anyway). In the above code, both versions of f get hoisted, and the "Me Original" version just gets hoisted later, they each get moved to the top but in the same order. I'd just like to add that generally, you should not name several functions the same way :) –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 27 at 12:50
4  
In strict mode you can't var the same name twice in the same scope. –  Hoffmann May 27 at 16:05
2  
"That should be obvious" - to you perhaps, but it was not obvious to me at a point, and it was not obvious to OP when he asked it, and naming, and more generally how the lexical environment is managed in JavaScript was one of the hardest things to grasp when first learning JavaScript to me. I would not be so quick to insult people who do not understand it. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 31 at 1:18

If doesn't look like anyone answered your follow-up question so I'll answer it here, though you should generally ask follow-up questions as separate questions.

You asked why this:

var f = new function() {
    console.log("Me original.");
}

function f() {
    console.log("Me duplicate.");
}

f();

prints out "Me original." and then an error.

What is happening here is that the new causes the function to be used as a constructor. So this is equivalent to the following:

function myConstructor() {
    console.log("Me original.");
}
var f = new myConstructor();

function f() {
    console.log("Me duplicate.");
}

f();

And thanks to the function hoisting that Benjamin explained, the above is essentially equivalent to this:

var myConstructor = function() {
    console.log("Me original.");
};
var f = function() {
    console.log("Me duplicate.");
};

f = new myConstructor();

f();

This expression:

var f = new function() {
    console.log("Me original.");
}

causes a new object to be constructed and assigned to f, using an anonymous function as the constructor. "Me original." is printed out as the constructor executes. But the object that is constructed is not itself a function, so when this eventually executes:

f();

you get an error, because f is not a function.

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Oh, wonderful! Thanks a lot for taking the trouble to answer it! :) :) –  dotslash Jun 4 at 2:00

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