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I am trying to figure out how to create ActiveRecord models with associations that can yield the same results as this SQL query:

SELECT login, first_name, last_name, email_address 
FROM accounts 
INNER JOIN people ON person.id = accounts.person_id
INNER JOIN email_address_people ON person.id = email_address_people.person_id 
INNER JOIN email_addresses ON email_address.id = email_address_people.email_address_id
INNER JOIN email_address_types ON email_address_types.id = email_address_people.email_address_type_id 
WHERE email_address_types.email_address_type = 'account';

The table structure is as follows, and assumes each table has an id per normal ActiveRecord convention:

accounts
id : int
person_id : int
login : string

people
id : int
first_name : string
last_name : string

email_address_people
id : int
person_id : int
email_address_id : int
email_address_type_id : int

email_addresses
id : int
email_address : string

email_address_types
id : int
email_address_type: string

I need the models to be fully functional, and not limited by things like :find_by_sql.

How do I create the associated models that make this possible?

Thanks!
Chris Benson
chris@chrisbenson.com

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2 Answers 2

Try this:

Your model classes:

  class EmailAddress < ActiveRecord::Base
  end

  class EmailAddressType < ActiveRecord::Base
  end

  class People < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :accounts
    has_many :email_address_people
    has_many :email_addresses, :through => :email_address_people

    has_many :account_email_address_people, 
                   :class_name => "EmailAddressPeople", 
                   :conditions => "email_address_type = 'account'"

    has_many :account_email_addresses, 
                   :through => :account_email_address_people

  end

  class EmailAddressPeople < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :person
    belongs_to :email_address
    belongs_to :email_address_type
  end

Your account model:

  class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :person

    # now to the actual method
    def account_emails
      person.account_email_addresses.map do |email|
        [login, person.first_name, person.last_name, email.email_address]
      end
    end

    # Brute force SQL if you prefer
    def account_emails2
       sql = "YOUR SQL HERE"
       self.connection.select_values(sql)
    end

  end

Assuming you have the Account object in hand account.account_emails makes two database calls:

  • Get the person using a id

  • Get the account emails for the person

Going directly to the database(i.e. account.account_emails2) is the fastest option, but it is not the Rails way.

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I think the best thing to do here is to give you the documentation first: http://railsbrain.com/api/rails-2.3.2/doc/index.html
Look up "has_many" (paying attention to :through) and "belongs_to", as well as "has_one", although I don't think you'll use the later.
This blog post will help you with the has_many :through concept -- and I think after that, you'll be set. Let us know if there's anything that's not clear!

class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :person
end

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :accounts
  has_many :email_addresses :through => :email_address_people
end

class EmailAddress < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :email_address_type
  belongs_to :person
  has_one :email_address_type
end

class EmailAddressType < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :email_addresses :through => :email_address_people
end

I would get started with that. It's not tested, but if we see what breaks, then we can fix it.. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I've already done that. Familiar with all of them - belongs_to, has_one, HABTM, HM:T. Already use them all, but can't figure out how to make this situation work correctly. Haven't found any examples on the web that cater to joins of this complexity. Could really use some sample model code that shows at least 4-5 normalized tables joined and uses them all in a standard query. –  Chris Mar 5 '10 at 19:35
    
Edited my answer (not sure if you'd be warned about that). –  Trevoke Mar 5 '10 at 20:12

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