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Here is the situation:

Silverlight 3 Application hits an asp.net hosted WCF service to get a list of items to display in a grid. Once the list is brought down to the client it is cached in IsolatedStorage. This is done by using the DataContractSerializer to serialize all of these objects to a stream which is then zipped and then encrypted. When the application is relaunched, it first loads from the cache (reversing the process above) and the deserializes the objects using the DataContractSerializer.ReadObject() method. All of this was working wonderfully under all scenarios until recently with the entire "load from cache" path (decrypt/unzip/deserialize) taking hundreds of milliseconds at most.

On some development machines but not all (all machines Windows 7) the deserialize process - that is the call to ReadObject(stream) takes several minutes an seems to lock up the entire machine BUT ONLY WHEN RUNNING IN THE DEBUGGER in VS2008. Running the Debug configuration code outside the debugger has no problem.

One thing that seems to look suspicious is that when you turn on stop on Exceptions, you can see that the ReadObject() throws many, many System.FormatException's indicating that a number was not in the correct format. When I turn off "Just My Code" thousands of these get dumped to the screen. None go unhandled. These occur both on the read back from the cache AND on a deserialization at the conclusion of a web service call to get the data from the WCF Service. HOWEVER, these same exceptions occur on my laptop development machine that does not experience the slowness at all. And FWIW, my laptop is really old and my desktop is a 4 core, 6GB RAM beast.

Again, no problems unless running under the debugger in VS2008. Anyone else seem this? Any thoughts?

Here is the bug report link: https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/539609/very-slow-performance-deserializing-using-datacontractserializer-in-a-silverlight-application-only-in-debugger

EDIT: I now know where the FormatExceptions are coming from. It seems that they are "by design" - they occur when when I have doubles being serialized that are double.NaN so that that xml looks like NaN...It seems that the DCS tries to parse the value as a number, that fails with an exception and then it looks for "NaN" et. al. and handles them. My problem is not that this does not work...it does...it is just that it completely cripples the debugger. Does anyone know how to configure the debugger/vs2008sp1 to handle this more efficiently.

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I think you've got enough detail to make a bug report at connect.microsoft.com/visualstudio. When you've reported, post the URL of the bug report here so we can vote on it. –  John Saunders Mar 5 '10 at 19:21
    
I'm curious, what are you using to create the zip for storage, I wasn't aware there had been any libraries for that ported to Silverlight or have you rolled your own? –  AnthonyWJones Mar 5 '10 at 19:51
    
@AnthonyWJones - I used the Silverlight SharpZipLib on Codeplex. codeplex.com/slsharpziplib - It does not have all of feature of the full deal, but it works fine for me. I have a CacheManager that moves stuff into and out of the cache. It you need more, just let me know... –  caryden Mar 5 '10 at 20:27
    
Are you asking why DCS throws so many exceptions? Or are you wondering your code runs slower when the debugger catches the exceptions? –  Gabe Mar 15 '10 at 21:26
    
@gabe - All I want is the ability to run in the debugger without waiting 2 minutes for the app to get going (load). FWIW the exceptions are not unhandled and the app functions. I was able to figure out why - see edit above. But what I need is a way to keep this behavior from grinding my development efforts to halt. –  caryden Mar 16 '10 at 2:53

5 Answers 5

cartden,

You may want to consider switching over to XMLSerializer instead. Here is what I have determined over time:

The XMLSerializer and DataContractSerializer classes provides a simple means of serializing and deserializing object graphs to and from XML.

The key differences are:
1.
XMLSerializer has much smaller payload than DCS if you use [XmlAttribute] instead of [XmlElement]
DCS always store values as elements
2.
DCS is "opt-in" rather than "opt-out"
With DCS you explicitly mark what you want to serialize with [DataMember]
With DCS you can serialize any field or property, even if they are marked protected or private
With DCS you can use [IgnoreDataMember] to have the serializer ignore certain properties
With XMLSerializer public properties are serialized, and need setters to be deserialized
With XmlSerializer you can use [XmlIgnore] to have the serializer ignore public properties
3.
BE AWARE! DCS.ReadObject DOES NOT call constructors during deserialization
If you need to perform initialization, DCS supports the following callback hooks:
[OnDeserializing], [OnDeserialized], [OnSerializing], [OnSerialized]
(also useful for handling versioning issues)

If you want the ability to switch between the two serializers, you can use both sets of attributes simultaneously, as in:

[DataContract]
[XmlRoot]
    public class ProfilePerson : NotifyPropertyChanges
    {
[XmlAttribute]
[DataMember]
        public string FirstName { get { return m_FirstName; } set { SetProperty(ref m_FirstName, value); } }
        private string m_FirstName;
[XmlElement]
[DataMember]
        public PersonLocation Location { get { return m_Location; } set { SetProperty(ref m_Location, value); } }
        private PersonLocation m_Location = new PersonLocation(); // Should change over time
[XmlIgnore]
[IgnoreDataMember]
        public Profile ParentProfile { get { return m_ParentProfile; } set { SetProperty(ref m_ParentProfile, value); } }
        private Profile m_ParentProfile = null;

        public ProfilePerson()
        {
        }
    }

Also, check out my Serializer class that can switch between the two:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace ClassLibrary
{
    // Instantiate this class to serialize objects using either XmlSerializer or DataContractSerializer
    internal class Serializer
    {
        private readonly bool m_bDCS;

        internal Serializer(bool bDCS)
        {
            m_bDCS = bDCS;
        }

        internal TT Deserialize<TT>(string input)
        {
            MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(input.ToByteArray());
            if (m_bDCS)
            {
                DataContractSerializer dc = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(TT));
                return (TT)dc.ReadObject(stream);
            }
            else
            {
                XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TT));
                return (TT)xs.Deserialize(stream);
            }
        }

        internal string Serialize<TT>(object obj)
        {
            MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();
            if (m_bDCS)
            {
                DataContractSerializer dc = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(TT));
                dc.WriteObject(stream, obj);
            }
            else
            {
                XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TT));
                xs.Serialize(stream, obj);
            }

            // be aware that the Unicode Byte-Order Mark will be at the front of the string
            return stream.ToArray().ToUtfString();
        }

        internal string SerializeToString<TT>(object obj)
        {
            StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
            XmlWriter xmlWriter = XmlWriter.Create(builder);
            if (m_bDCS)
            {
                DataContractSerializer dc = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(TT));
                dc.WriteObject(xmlWriter, obj);
            }
            else
            {
                XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TT));
                xs.Serialize(xmlWriter, obj);
            }

            string xml = builder.ToString();
            xml = RegexHelper.ReplacePattern(xml, RegexHelper.WildcardToPattern("<?xml*>", WildcardSearch.Anywhere), string.Empty);
            xml = RegexHelper.ReplacePattern(xml, RegexHelper.WildcardToPattern(" xmlns:*\"*\"", WildcardSearch.Anywhere), string.Empty);
            xml = xml.Replace(Environment.NewLine + "  ", string.Empty);
            xml = xml.Replace(Environment.NewLine, string.Empty);
            return xml;
        }
    }
}
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Thanks - but the DataContractSerializer works GREAT in production and has in debug until just recently. I can't justify redoing my whole service layer to use a different serializer for this when what I have work great in production. BUT it is huge PITB and becoming a productivity killer in debug mode - hence the bounty. –  caryden Mar 15 '10 at 21:24

This is a guess, but I think it is running slow in debug mode because for every exception, it is performing some actions to show the exception in the debug window, etc. If you are running in release mode, these extra steps are not taken.

I've never done this, so I really don't know id it would work, but have you tried just setting that one assembly to run in release mode while all others are set to debug? If I'm right, it may solve your problem. If I'm wrong, then you only waste 1 or 2 minutes.

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You are right. I was able to confirm that this is the reason by a similar means. The larger issue was what is causing the FormatExceptions. –  caryden Mar 17 '10 at 5:01

About your debugging problem, have you tried to disable the exception assistant ? (Tools > Options > Debugging > Enable the exception assistant).

Another point should be the exception handling in Debug > Exceptions : you can disable the user-unhandled stuff for the CLR or only uncheck the System.FormatException exception.

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Yep I did both of these. –  caryden Mar 17 '10 at 4:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok - I figured out the root issue. It was what I alluded to in the EDIT to the main question. The problem was that in the xml, it was correctly serializing doubles that had a value of double.NaN. I was using these values to indicate "na" for when the denominator was 0D. Example: ROE (Return on Equity = Net Income / Average Equity) when Average Equity is 0D would be serialized as:

<ROE>NaN</ROE> 

When the DCS tried to de-serialize it, evidently it first tries to read the number and then catches the exception when that fails and then handles the NaN. The problem is that this seems to generate a lot of overhead when in DEBUG mode.

Solution: I changed the property to double? and set it to null instead of NaN. Everything now happens instantly in DEBUG mode now. Thanks to all for your help.

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Try disabling some IE addons. In my case, the LastPass toolbar killed my Silverlight debugging. My computer would freeze for minutes each time I interacted with Visual Studio after a breakpoint.

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