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Consider the following class

public class Class1
{
    public int A { get; set; }
    public int B { get; set; }

    public int GetComplexResult()
    {
        return A + B;
    }
}

In order to use GetComplexResult, a consumer of this class would have to know to set A and B before calling the method. If GetComplexResult accesses many properties to calculate its result, this can lead to wrong return values if the consumer doesn't set all the appropriate properties first. So you might write this class like this instead

public class Class2
{
    public int A { get; set; }
    public int B { get; set; }

    public int GetComplexResult(int a, int b)
    {
        return a + b;
    }
}

This way, a caller to GetComplexResult is forced to pass in all the required values, ensuring the expected return value is correctly calculated. But if there are many required values, the parameter list grows as well and this doesn't seem like good design either. It also seems to break the point of encapsulating A, B and GetComplexResult in a single class. I might even be tempted to make GetComplexResult static since it doesn't require an instance of the class to do its work. I don't want to go around making a bunch of static methods.

Are there terms to describe these 2 different ways of creating classes? They both seem to have pros and cons - is there something I'm not understanding that should tell me that one way is better than the other? How does unit testing influence this choice?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you use a real-world example the answer becomes clearer.

public class person
{
    public string firstName { get; set; }
    public string lastName { get; set; }

    public string getFullName()
    {
        return firstName + " " + lastName;
    }
}

The point of an entity object is that it contains information about an entity, and can do the operations that the entity needs to do (based on the information it contains). So yes, there are situations in which certain operations won't work properly because the entity hasn't been fully initialized, but that's not a failure of design. If, in the real world, I ask you for the full name of a newborn baby who hasn't been named yet, that will fail also.

If certain properties are essential to an entity doing its job, they can be initialized in a constructor. Another approach is to have a boolean that checks whether the entity is in a state where a given method can be called:

while (person.hasAnotherQuestion()) {
  person.answerNextQuestion();
}
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I always try to call getters instead of directly accessing members, and in the getter I log a message if I'm returning a null value. I used to use assertions, but then we found out that some of our customers run with assertions enabled in production (!). –  TMN Mar 5 '10 at 20:17
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A good design rule is to make sure that all constructors initializes objects to valid states and that all property setters and methods then enforces the valid state. This way there will never be any objects in invalid states.

If the default values for A and B, which is 0 is not a valid state that yields a valid result from GetComplexResult, you should a constructor that initialized A and B to valid a state.

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If some of the fields are never allowed to be null then you would typically make them parameters to the class constructor. If you don't always have all of the required values available at once then using a builder class may be helpful.

For example:

public Builder {
    private int a;
    private int b;

    public Class1 create() {
        // some validation logic goes here
        // to make sure we have everything and
        // either fill in defaults or throw an error
        // if needed
        return new Class1(a, b)
    }

    public Builder a(int val) { a = val; }
    public Builder b(int val) { b = val; }
}

This Builder can then be used as follows.

Class1 obj1 = new Builder().a(5).b(6).create();

Builder builder = new Builder();
// do stuff to find value of a
builder.a(valueOfA);
// do stuff to find value of b
builder.b(valueOfB);
// do more stuff
Class1 obj2 = builder.create();
Class2 obj3 = builder.create();

This design allows you to lock down the Entity classes to whatever degree is appropriate while still allowing for a flexible construction process. It also opens the door to customizing the construction process with other implementations without changing the entity class contract.

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