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If I distribute an iOS framework library that detects a simulator at compile-time, the part of the fat binary that’s compiled for the simulator will always work in the simulator, and the code outside the #if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR macro will always work on a device. So is it really ever necessary to detect a simulator at run-time?

In other words, can the ARM device parts of the fat binary every find themselves running on a simulator?

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"So is it really ever necessary to detect a simulator at run-time?" and "can the ARM device parts of the fat binary every find themselves running on a simulator?" are totally, completely different questions. –  The Paramagnetic Croissant May 27 at 17:31

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No, the ARM code can never run in the simulator. The simulator can - by definition - only execute native - i.e. Intel - code. Otherwise, it would be called emulator.

(Android has a device emulator as opposed to iOS' simulator.)

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Exactly as I thought, thanks fort the confirmation! –  theory May 27 at 17:45

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