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I basically want to do this in code:

PersonList myPersonList;
//populate myPersonList here, not shown

Foreach (Person myPerson in myPersonList)
{
...
}

Class declare

public class PersonList
{
 public List<Person> myIntenalList;

 Person CustomFunction()
 {...}
}

So how do I expose "myInternalList" in my class as the default value that the Foreach statement can use it? Or can I? Reason being is that I have about 50 classes that are currently using GenericCollection that I'd like to move to generics but don't want to re-write a ton.

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What do you mean by "default value?" C# doesn't have default properties like VB. –  Payton Byrd Mar 5 '10 at 20:12
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could make PersonList implement IEnumerable<Person>

public class PersonList : IEnumerable<Person>
{
    public List<Person> myIntenalList;

    public IEnumerator<Person> GetEnumerator()
    {
         return this.myInternalList.GetEnumerator();
    }

    Person CustomFunction()
    {...}
}

Or even simpler, just make PersonList extend List:

public class PersonList : List<Person>
{
    Person CustomFunction() { ... }
}

The first method has the advantage of not exposing the methods of List<T>, while the second is more convenient if you want that functionality. Also, you should make myInternalList private.

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1  
I would choose the solution of having PersonList implement IEnumerable<Person> rather than inheriting from List<Person>. See my answer here for more on that: stackoverflow.com/questions/2136213/… –  LBushkin Mar 5 '10 at 20:23
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The easiest way is to inherit from your generic list:

public class PersonList : List<Person>
{
   public bool CustomMethod()
   { 
     //...
   }

}
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This exposes also the methods for altering the list, I don't know whether this is indeded by the OP. If not use Lee's solution. –  Obalix Mar 5 '10 at 20:18
2  
It's generally not a good idea to inherit from the .NET collection classes. See my response here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2136213/…. –  LBushkin Mar 5 '10 at 20:22
    
@LBushkin That's only necessary if they want to override add, etc. But still something good to keep in mind. –  C. Ross Mar 5 '10 at 20:31
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Why don't you simply change the base class on PersonList to be Collection<Person>? Persumably it can already enumerate on Person, so your foreach would still work.

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