Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to plot two different sets of functions going once through a double loop. I don't know how I can ask subplot2grid to act on the second figure.

import numpy as np
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
t=np.linspace(0,1,100)
fig1=plt.figure()
for i in range(3):
    for j in range(3):
        plt.subplot2grid((3,3),(i,j))
        plt.plot(t,np.sin((t*np.random.random()*10)))
fig2=plt.figure()
for i in range(3):
    for j in range(3):
        plt.subplot2grid((3,3),(i,j))
        plt.plot(t,np.cos((t*np.random.random()*10)))
plt.show()

Is there any way to do this with only one loop?

enter image description here enter image description here

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should use the object-oriented interface. Here is an example:

import numpy as np
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

t = np.linspace(0, 1, 100)
fig1, axes1 = plt.subplots(3, 3)
fig2, axes2 = plt.subplots(3, 3)

blue, red = "#1E90FF", "#FF6347"
for i in range(3):
    for j in range(3):
        axes1[i, j].plot(t, np.sin((t * np.random.random() * 10)), blue)
        axes2[i, j].plot(t, np.cos((t * np.random.random() * 10)), red)

fig1.tight_layout()
fig2.tight_layout()

enter image description here enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
what is wrong with 'b' and 'r'? –  tcaswell May 27 at 21:12
    
I was hoping that more attractive images would yield me additional internet points. –  mwaskom May 27 at 21:45

You can set the current figure inside the loop, like plt.figure(1), do stuff for this figure, plt.figure(2), do stuff for this figure, etc.

fig1=plt.figure()
fig2=plt.figure()

for i in range(3):
    for j in range(3):
        plt.figure(fig1.number)   # fig1 is now active
        # Plot stuff for the first figure
        plt.figure(fig2.number)
        # Plot stuff for the second figure

plt.show()

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. Is there other means of doing it? By OOP approach for example? –  Cupitor May 27 at 19:09
    
I don't understand your question. Can you please elaborate a bit? –  Reti43 May 27 at 19:10
2  
For this kind of application it is much better to use the object oriented interface. –  mwaskom May 27 at 19:14
    
Got it. Thanks. –  Reti43 May 27 at 19:16
    
You should almost never use pyplot in a script. –  tcaswell May 27 at 21:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.