Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

WHat is a good way to format a python decimal like this way?

1.00 --> '1'
1.20 --> '1.2'
1.23 --> '1.23'
1.234 --> '1.23'
1.2345 --> '1.23'

share|improve this question
1  
When converting to a string? –  Justin Peel Mar 5 '10 at 20:56
    
Yes, converting to a string. –  juanefren Mar 5 '10 at 23:01
    
If you're using Decimal and not float you might also want to look at stackoverflow.com/questions/11227620/…. {:g} doesn't chop off insignificant zeros from decimals. –  Pankrat Jul 4 '13 at 10:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 48 down vote accepted

If you have Python 2.6 or newer, use format:

'{0:.3g}'.format(num)

For Python 2.5 or older:

'%.3g'%(num)

Explanation:

{0}tells format to print the first argument -- in this case, num.

Everything after the colon (:) specifies the format_spec.

.3 sets the precision to 3.

g removes insignificant zeros. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Printf#fprintf

For example:

tests=[(1.00,'1'),
       (1.2,'1.2'),
       (1.23,'1.23'),
       (1.234,'1.23'),
       (1.2345,'1.23')]

for num,answer in tests:
    result='{0:.3g}'.format(num)
    if result != answer:
        print('Error: {0} --> {1} != {2}'.format(num,result,answer))
        exit()
    else:
        print('{0} --> {1}'.format(num,result))

yields

1.0 --> 1
1.2 --> 1.2
1.23 --> 1.23
1.234 --> 1.23
1.2345 --> 1.23
share|improve this answer
4  
It seems this causes Python 2.7 to go into the scientific notation for larger numbers: >>> "{0:.3g}".format(100.20) '100' >>> "{0:.3g}".format(1001.20) '1e+03' –  vdboor Oct 17 '13 at 11:30
    
So how to set no Exponent notation. As {:,2f}.format(number) dose, but also removes insignificant zeros –  Aylwyn Lake Dec 26 '13 at 3:11

Only first part of Justin's answer is correct. Using "%.3g" will not work for all cases as .3 is not the precision, but total number of digits. Try it for numbers like 1000.123 and it breaks.

So, I would use what Justin is suggesting:

>>> ('%.4f' % 12340.123456).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
'12340.1235'
>>> ('%.4f' % -400).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
'-400'
>>> ('%.4f' % 0).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
'0'
>>> ('%.4f' % .1).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')
'0.1'
share|improve this answer

Here's a function that will do the trick:

def myformat(x):
    return ('%.2f' % x).rstrip('0').rstrip('.')

And here are your examples:

>>> myformat(1.00)
'1'
>>> myformat(1.20)
'1.2'
>>> myformat(1.23)
'1.23'
>>> myformat(1.234)
'1.23'
>>> myformat(1.2345)
'1.23'

Edit:

From looking at other people's answers and experimenting, I found that g does all of the stripping stuff for you. So,

'%.3g' % x

works splendidly too and is slightly different from what other people are suggesting (using '{0:.3}'.format() stuff). I guess take your pick.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice. Much cleaner than mine. –  Mike Cialowicz Mar 5 '10 at 21:13
    
When you get something like 0.0000005 though I believe '%.3g'%x will begin to give you exponents? –  PriceChild Mar 16 '12 at 9:39

Just use Python's standard string formatting methods:

>>> "{0:.2}".format(1.234232)
'1.2'
>>> "{0:.3}".format(1.234232)
'1.23'

If you are using a Python version under 2.6, use

>>> "%f" % 1.32423
'1.324230'
>>> "%.2f" % 1.32423
'1.32'
>>> "%d" % 1.32423
'1'
share|improve this answer
    
This is not a general solution and won't work for numbers with trailing zeros. –  Mike Cialowicz Mar 5 '10 at 21:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.