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This is a probably a no brainer, and I've been searching but can't seem to find an answer. What is the term (and any alternate terms) for a graph with only two vertices and only one edge between them?

This is not a homework question :-)

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Is that a straight line? –  Skilldrick Mar 5 '10 at 21:59
    
K2, aka a boring graph ? –  mjv Mar 5 '10 at 22:03
    
I don't think so. I was thinking something like "connection" if it is a network graph. I see a couple of answers now, which are good, but I kind of thought it might be a simple one word term since it probably comes up in discussion a lot. –  harschware Mar 5 '10 at 22:04
    
Belongs on mathoverflow.net –  Ian Nelson Mar 5 '10 at 22:10
    
@Ian Nelson: This is probably off-topic for mathoverflow.net -- too elementary. The intended audience is "professional mathematicians, mathematics graduate students, and advanced undergraduates". I think the question is fine here on SO. –  Jim Lewis Mar 6 '10 at 0:58
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The complete graph on 2 vertices. Denoted K2. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complete_graph

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I wouldn't say this is a standard but its the first thing that came to my mind. –  job Mar 5 '10 at 22:02
    
Thanks for the edit Cory, looked for how to do subscripts, but I missed it. –  adharris Mar 5 '10 at 22:03
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I don't know if an exact term exists, however it is a bipartite complete planar graph with 2 vertices for sure.

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From further reading I found Regular Graph entry on wikipedia. It would seem to be a "1-regular graph", though there are other graphs which also qualify as such.

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