Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm up to lesson 14 on the famous "Learn C The Hard Way" online course.

In that lesson, it introduces the concept of forward declarations in C. There are two forward declarations in the code sample. One of them can be commented out, and the code still compiles, but the other one cannot be commented out. To me they both look equally as important.

Here's the code. It simply prints out all characters and their hex codes if they are from the alphabet, otherwise it skips them.

The two compiler outputs are at the bottom of the code. Could someone explain why one errors out and the other one doesn't?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

// forward declarations
int can_print_it(char ch);       //NOT OK to skip(??)
void print_letters(char arg[]);  //OK to skip(??)

void print_arguments(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int i = 0;

    for(i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
        print_letters(argv[i]);
    }
}

void print_letters(char arg[])
{
    int i = 0;

    for(i = 0; arg[i] != '\0'; i++) {
        char ch = arg[i];

        if(can_print_it(ch)) {
            printf("'%c' == %d ", ch, ch);
        }
    }

    printf("\n");
}

int can_print_it(char ch)
{
    return isalpha(ch) || isblank(ch);
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    print_arguments(argc, argv);
    return 0;
}

If I comment out the first forward declaration (first one only), this happens:

cc -Wall -g    ex14.c   -o ex14
ex14.c: In function ‘print_letters’:
ex14.c:24:9: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘can_print_it’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
ex14.c: At top level:
ex14.c:32:5: error: conflicting types for ‘can_print_it’
ex14.c:33:1: note: an argument type that has a default promotion can’t match an empty parameter name list declaration
ex14.c:24:12: note: previous implicit declaration of ‘can_print_it’ was here
make[1]: *** [ex14] Error 1
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/andrew/c_tutorials/lesson14/ex14_original'
make: *** [all] Error 2

And if I comment out the second declaration (second one only), this happens:

cc -Wall -g    ex14.c   -o ex14
ex14.c: In function ‘print_arguments’:
ex14.c:13:9: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘print_letters’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
ex14.c: At top level:
ex14.c:17:6: warning: conflicting types for ‘print_letters’ [enabled by default]
ex14.c:13:9: note: previous implicit declaration of ‘print_letters’ was here
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/andrew/c_tutorials/lesson14/ex14_original'
share|improve this question
4  
The other answers didn't mention it explicitly; but when you call an undeclared function, it behaves as if there was this declaration: int functionname(); . This is a non-prototype declaration, and the rules regarding argument count and promotions in non-prototype declarations are what Floris is describing. These rules also apply to arguments which correspond to ... in a variadic prototyped function. The promotion-related errors are possible when a function has a non-prototype declaration but a prototyped definition. –  Matt McNabb May 28 '14 at 4:40

2 Answers 2

Well compiler hints why this does happen. The crucial thing it here:

ex14.c:32:5: error: conflicting types for ‘can_print_it’
ex14.c:33:1: note: an argument type that has a default promotion can’t match an empty parameter name list declaration

The argument for can_print_it has a default promotion, therefore it cannot have an implicit declaration. Great read on it is here: Default argument promotions in C function calls. Basically, the argument type for can_print_it (char) is illegal to be used with implicit declarations. To make it work, you would need to use appropriate type, for char it is int. For other types you can check out the linked question and answer.

The print_letters has no such arguments its argument is of a pointer type.

Side-note: As one could see, with 3 wrong answers, people get confused. Implicit declarations are not used often and can be tricky. IMO in general, or at least practical applications, their usage is discouraged. Nevertheless, they are perfectly legal.

share|improve this answer
4  
Finally someone who actually read the question! –  ooga May 28 '14 at 4:13
1  
Still got -1 =). I actually read the error, not the warnings =). –  luk32 May 28 '14 at 4:14
3  
It's a serious flaw in the system that people can give a -1 anonymously and run away. –  ooga May 28 '14 at 4:15
1  
To their credit they deleted their answers and removed the -1's. –  ooga May 28 '14 at 4:17
3  
Small nitpick: can_print_it can have an implicit declaration, but it is undefined behaviour only if the function is later defined with a prototyped definition, and the function is actually called at runtime. –  Matt McNabb May 28 '14 at 4:34

You give a function prototype so the compiler knows what to do when it first comes across that function in your code. Specifically, if it has no other information, the compiler will

  • assume that the return value is an int
  • promote arguments:
    • "integer types" to int (so char becomes int, for example)
    • promote float to double
    • pointers become pointers to int

The problem is that when you convert a char to an int, it is possible that the significant byte ends up offset by (for example) 3 bytes from where you thought you stored it - since a value like 0x33 might be stored as 0x00000033. Depending on the architecture of the machine, this will cause a problem.

The same is not true with pointers. A pointer "always" has the same size, and always points to the first byte of the object (this wasn't always true... some of us remember "near" and "far" pointers, and not with nostalgia). Thus, even though the compiler may think it is passing a pointer to an int, the subsequent interpretation (by the function-that-had-not-been-declared) as a pointer to a char does not cause a problem.

The fact that your second function is declared as void when the compiler assumed it would return int does not matter, since you never used its return value (which it doesn't have) in an assignment or expression. So even though it's a bit confusing for the compiler, this generates only a warning, not an error. And since the argument is a pointer, the promotion rules again don't cause a conflict.

That said - it is a good idea to always declare your function prototypes before using them; in general, you should turn on all compiler warnings, and improve your code until it compiles without warnings or errors.

share|improve this answer
1  
To be clear, the mismatch of the return value causes undefined behaviour; although on OP's system that UB doesn't have any bad effects. The pointer argument does not cause UB because there is no mismatch. –  Matt McNabb May 28 '14 at 4:33
    
@MattMcNabb - you are right. If you use an undeclared void function in a statement like x = undeclaredVoid(123); then the compiler will let it go, and the value of x will be undefined (whatever was on the stack, presumably). If you had made a forward declaration, that line would not even compile, I imagine. –  Floris May 28 '14 at 4:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.