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I see the following example from Writer section in learn you a haskell.

    import Control.Monad.Writer  

    logNumber :: Int -> Writer [String] Int  
    logNumber x = Writer (x, ["Got number: " ++ show x])  

    multWithLog :: Writer [String] Int  
    multWithLog = do  
        a <- logNumber 3  
        b <- logNumber 5  
        return (a*b) 

The result is:

    ghci> runWriter multWithLog  
    (15,["Got number: 3","Got number: 5"]) 

I know that in do notation <- will extract the value from the context. so a and b should be tuples with format (Int, [String]) according to Writer's declaration. I feel a and b should be two integers in return (a*b), otherwise we cannot do multiplication.

What is my misunderstanding here? Can someone help? Many thanks.

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1  
You already know: "I know that in do notation <- will extract the value from the context." (Emphasis added) Yes, it extracts the value from the context, so the monad context (here roughly [String]) is not included in the x of x <- .... –  Franky May 28 at 7:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The main "work" in monads is produced in >>= (bind) function. Monads are some sort of computation builders. So if you want to know how computations happens in concrete Monad, you need to open implementation of it's >>= and return funcs.

E.g. Writer's monad implementation:

instance (Monoid w) => Monad (Writer w) where
    return a = Writer (a, mempty)
    m >>= k  = Writer $ let
        (a, w)  = runWriter m
        (b, w') = runWriter (k a)
        in (b, w `mappend` w')

So it takes another writer m, get it's computation results a (Int in your case) and additional context w ([String]) by executing runWriter on it. Then it feeds result to function k that returns another Writer. After getting the result, it combines to contexts by applying mappend which in case of list is ++.

So composition of Strings occurs in w mappend w'. All this happens behind the scenes.

As you can see, >>= feeds to function k only the result a (Int), without any context([String]). That's why you don't have any pairs in you code.

Maybe if you rewrite your code without "do" syntactic sugar it will be more clear:

import Control.Monad.Writer
logNumber :: Int -> Writer [String] Int 
logNumber x = Writer (x, ["Got number: " ++ show x])  
multWithLog =
    logNumber 3 >>=
    \a -> logNumber 5 >>=
    \b -> return (a*b)
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I understand your point. My further question is how return knows ["Got number: 3","Got number: 5"] should be contained in the Writer that it creates. >>= feeds to function k only the result a without any context, so I have no idea why return knows what to do. –  user811416 May 28 at 16:37
1  
return knows nothing about previous context or something. All return does is that he create Writer with empty context ([] in this case). So return a*b creates Writer (a*b) []. But because we chain actions using >>=, we get such concatenation in the end. Look at the code in >>=, we store previous context in w and concatenate it with new one - w'. After first action w = ["Got: 3"], and w' - context of the rest action. What it equals? Do next step: w = ["Got: 5"] and w' = [] resulting in: ["Got: 5"] ++ [] = ["Got: 5"]. Now return to previous : ["Got: 3"] ++ ["Got: 5"]. –  uv.nikita May 28 at 18:23
    
The main key - return doesn't do something special. We need to put it in the end only to write a*b in the result without changing a context (list ++ [] = list). You can remove it: multWithLog = logNumber 3 >>= \a -> logNumber 5 –  uv.nikita May 28 at 18:30

Ignore the definition of logNumber for a second and just care for its signature:

logNumber :: Int -> Writer [String] Int

We know that Writer s is a monad (given Monoid s). Lets use a type synonym StringWriter for a second to make things clearer:

type StringWriter = Writer [String]
logNumber :: Int -> StringWriter Int

Remember, Writer s is a monad, and StringWriter is simply a type synonym to that monad. We also change the type of multWithLog:

multWithLog :: StringWriter Int  

It should be clear now that the value wrapped in the StringWriter context is an Int, and not a pair. Now, go back to your statement:

I know that in do notation <- will extract the value from the context.

And at this point it should be obvious that the value being extracted has type Int.

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I thought Writer is a monad. –  user811416 May 28 at 9:25
    
How does the code know to put ["Got number: 3","Got number: 5"] in the final return statetment? I don't see any code passing the list of strings to the return statement. –  user811416 May 28 at 9:42
2  
No. Writer is a type constructor with arity 2 (that is, the Writer type constructor expects 2 type arguments in order to have a type). As a monad always is a type constructor of arity 1, we need first apply Writter to a type argument in order to get a monad. Therefore Writer is not a monad, but Writer [String] is. –  Romildo May 28 at 9:44
    
runWriter writer runs the writer computation and results in the pair composed by the its return value and the final context. In your example, the computation returns 15 and the final context is ["Got number: 3","Got number: 5"], therefore the result is the pair (15,["Got number: 3","Got number: 5"]). –  Romildo May 28 at 9:48
    
In multiWithLog, how is the list of strings passed into the final return? I see return x = Writer (x, mempty) in the monad definition of Writer. –  user811416 May 28 at 10:17

Your first statement, that a and b are tuples, isn't quite correct.

If we have something like

foo = do
  ...
  baz <- bar
  quux

if bar :: m a then we can treat baz as a value of type a in quux since <- desugars (roughly) to

foo = do
  ...
  bar >>= \baz -> quux
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Zeta explained quite nicely why a and b are Int and not pairs.

I think the main point of confusion stems from the last row

return (a*b) 

If a = 3 and b = 5, shouldn't this result in Writer (15, [])? Well, it does, but where does the ["Got number: 3","Got number: 5"] come from then?

The answer lies in the implementation of >>=. Let's remove the syntactic sugar of the do notation:

multWithLog = do  
    a <- logNumber 3  
    b <- logNumber 5  
    return (a*b) 

is equivalent to

logNumber 3 >>= (\a ->
logNumber 5 >>= (\b ->
return (a*b)))

is equivalent to

Writer (3, ["Got number: 3"]) >>= (\a ->
Writer (5, ["Got number: 5"]) >>= (\b ->
Writer (a*b, [])))

is equivalent to

Writer (3, ["Got number: 3"]) >>= (\a ->
Writer (5, ["Got number: 5"]) >>= (\b ->
Writer (3*5, [])))

Remember, >>= is a binary function (function that takes two arguments) that returns a Writer (Int, [String]), i.e. a Writer with an Int and a log. The returned log from the function >>= is a combination of the first argument's log ["Got number 3", "Got number 5"] and the second argument's log [].


I lied o_o
Sidenote: the actual order of log appending, if you look at the parentheses, will be

["Got number: 3"] ++ (["Got number: 5"] ++ [])
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