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well, I have a function, like

Public Function test() As DateTime
  Dim Result As DateTime = Date.Now
  Try
    ' this file is nonexistent, so it will crash
    IO.File.Open("C:/asdasd.txt", IO.FileMode.Open)  

  Catch
    Return False
  End Try

  Return Result 
End Function

Of course, it will cause an error saying it's not allowed to return a type of boolean. My question is, is it possible to return a different datatype, when the function encounters an error inside the Try-Catch statement? Say, return a Boolean, or string, when error occurs?

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Return remains only one which you are already specified. However you can send parameters by reference and modify those when you want different results. –  Hassan Nisar May 28 at 7:13
    
you can use Return Nothing, and check if the result Is Nothing. also you'll need to convert that string to a proper DateTime format, or just return String instead. you can check String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnVal). –  porkchop May 28 at 13:01
    
as for returning a different data type, you could Overload the function, but that would assume you already knew what return type you wanted, or as Steve mentioned in one answer, you can return type Object and CType or DirectCast or TryCast it. but if you just need to return a single value like Nothing, then unnecessary. –  porkchop May 28 at 13:09
    
or you could return a custom class... i think there are 2 more options ;o –  porkchop May 28 at 13:15
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4 Answers 4

You should only throw exceptions when something happened that you didn't expect, or couldn't anticipate. You can anticipate the file may not exist so check for that.

Consider re-writing your function like this. Using a boolean return value indictaing whether the method succeeded or failed and a ByRef date value:

Public Function ReadValueFromFile(ByRef value As DateTime) As Boolean
    Try
        Dim filename As String = "C:/asdasd.txt"

        'just return false if the file does not exist
        If Not My.Computer.FileSystem.FileExists(filename) Then Return False

        'if the file exists then return the current time
        IO.File.Open("C:/asdasd.txt", IO.FileMode.Open)
        value = DateTime.Now
        Return True

    Catch
        'an exception was thrown so return false
        Return False
    End Try
End Function

You can then call it like this:

Dim value As DateTime = DateTime.MinValue
If ReadValueFromFile(value) Then
    Debug.WriteLine("File read at time:" & value)
End If
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Short answer: No. Your function definition is a contract and you must fulfill it. You could define your function as simply returning the super type of Object which would allow you to return anything but then how would you know what the type is when you get is back? And why would you want to return multiple possible types anyway? You would not be able to tell if your function was successful without nasty code which sniffs the type and possibly even has to handle and swallow exceptions. Just don't even go there.

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You can't return different types, but you could structure this like the TryParse methods:

Public Function test(ByRef Result As  DateTime) As Boolean
    Result = Date.Now

    Try
        ' this file is nonexistent, so it will crash
        IO.File.Open("C:/asdasd.txt", IO.FileMode.Open)  
    Catch
        Return False
    End Try

    Return True
End Function

and then call it like:

    Dim resultDate as DateTime
    If Not test(resultDate) Then 
        ' Do Fail Code
    End If

As @steve-pettifer points out is bad to use exceptions to control flow, so something like this would be better:

Public Function test(ByRef Result As  DateTime) As Boolean
    If Not IO.File.Exists("C:/asdasd.txt") Then 
        Result = DateTime.MinValue
        Return False
    End If

    IO.File.Open("C:/asdasd.txt", IO.FileMode.Open)  
    Result = Date.Now
    Return True
End Function
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Again, do not use exceptions to control flow. Instead of relying on failure, test using My.Computer.FileSystem.FileExists instead. –  Steve Pettifer May 28 at 7:18
    
Completely agree, wasn't really looking at the contents of the method more showing the TryParse kind of structure –  JDunkerley May 28 at 7:19
    
Fair enough, but you know what will happen - lots of beginners who see that will take it as read that it's OK to swallow exceptions and won't learn to write defensive code. –  Steve Pettifer May 28 at 7:23
    
@StevePettifer i think it would be clearer to mention that you still have to catch other exception, but throwing them in the case .FileExists returns false, is incorrect. –  porkchop May 28 at 12:59
    
@porkchop Well you don't have to catch them and there's plenty who would argue that you should never catch them except in rare circumstances but this isn't the place for that discussion. –  Steve Pettifer May 28 at 13:04
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The best way to do that is to throw an exception that describes the error. You can then customize the contents (hence type) of the exception according to your needs. The type of exception thrown can somehow be viewed as an alternate return type.

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I disagree - you should not use exceptions to control the flow of your application. There are much better ways to write code without resorting to throwing exceptions. –  Steve Pettifer May 28 at 7:16
    
Exceptions considered a bad way to report an error ??? –  Serge - appTranslator May 28 at 7:18
1  
If you have to throw it then yes, that's bad. Exceptions should be, as the name implies, exceptional. Just because a file does not exist, for example, you should not throw an exception because you can test for the existence and handle the lack of file gracefully. Exceptions are for truly broken and un-recoverable situations, not for controlling the flow of your logic. –  Steve Pettifer May 28 at 7:20
    
So you consider that a file that doesn't exist is a recoverable error. It could very well be the opposite. We can't guess that from the OP's post. I considered the file is expected to exist. If it is not, I agree it's a different story. But we can't tell. –  Serge - appTranslator May 28 at 7:29
    
That's not really a very good answer though. It encourages the incorrect use of exceptions and is totally unnecessary. –  Steve Pettifer May 28 at 7:30
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