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The part that I can't quite get to work is the conditional as it's always failing:

use Test::More tests => 2;

my $regex = qr/(\d+),(\d+)
               (?(?{\g1<\g2})(*FAIL))
              /x ;

  like( "(23,36)", $regex, 'should match'     );
unlike( "(36,23)", $regex, 'should not match' );

Output

not ok 1 - should match
#   Failed test 'should match'
#   at - line 7.
#                   '(23,36)'
#     doesn't match '(?^x:(\d+),(\d+)
#                    (?(?{\g1<\g2})(*FAIL))
#                   )'
ok 2 - should not match
# Looks like you failed 1 test of 2.
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your code needs the following fixes:

  • Use the $1 and $2 variables in the experimental (?{ }) code block.
  • Need to invert your test to match what you want to fail.
  • You need to prevent backtracking where if the code block indicates a failure, you don't want it to match a substring that will pass, such as 6 is less then 23 in the second test. There are two methods to prevent this:
    • Add word boundaries so the regex can't match a partial number.
    • Use the (*SKIP) control verb to prevent backtracking explicitly.

The code:

use strict;
use warnings;

use Test::More tests => 2;

my $regex = qr/(\d+),(\d+)
               (?(?{$1 > $2})(*SKIP)(*FAIL))
              /x ;

  like( "(23,36)", $regex, 'should match'     );
unlike( "(36,23)", $regex, 'should not match' );

Outputs:

1..2
ok 1 - should match
ok 2 - should not match
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I do need to invert my test, not sure how I missed that :( –  Zaid May 28 at 8:02
    
@Miller Couldn't you use my $regex = qr/\b(\d+),(\d+)\b(??{$1 > $2})/; here? –  hwnd May 28 at 8:08
    
(I wonder why (?{}) is still considered "experimental" =^_^=) –  user2864740 May 28 at 8:09
    
I couldn't find any place in the documentation where it mentions that $1 should be used instead of \g1 inside code blocks. –  Zaid May 28 at 8:12
    
@hwnd That would work technically, but almost by accident. When that evaluates to true, it tries to match the number 1 within the string. But because the regex ends in \d\b, it's impossible for there to be a trailing 1. When the condition fails, it tries to match the empty string and passes. So it "works", but by accident. And within other context might easily fail. –  Miller May 28 at 8:15

Although Miller's solution does exactly what you requested - implement the check entirely within the regular expression match - I would be remiss if I didn't suggest a saner solution :-) Don't do this with a regular expression alone!

use strict;
use warnings;

use Test::More tests => 2;

sub match {
    my $str = shift;

    if ($str =~ m/ (\d+) , (\d+) /x) {
        return $1 < $2;
    }

    return;
}

ok(match("(23,36)"), 'should match');
ok(!match("(36,23)"), 'should not match');

This is much clearer, simpler, and probably faster!

1..2
ok 1 - should match
ok 2 - should not match
share|improve this answer
    
If this was just a case of a simple match, I totally agree with you. In my actual problem I was performing a conditional substitution with s///, where it would be a bit more messy to test for $1 < $2 outside the regex. +1 for the sanity check. –  Zaid Jun 4 at 8:47
    
Understood - but I still think I would do a separate match, check, then substitution even in that case :-) Might be worth running two the solutions through Dumbbench. I have a sneaking suspicion that the experimental ?{} code block is slow. Of course only if performance is important... but if it's not I would default to the clearer more self-documenting solution. –  Kaoru Jun 4 at 8:51

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