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Incrementing in C++ - When to use x++ or ++x?

What is the difference between

for (int i = 0; i < MAX; i++)
{
//...do something
}

and

for (int i = 0; i < MAX; ++i)
{
//...do something
}

?

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marked as duplicate by Greg Hewgill, Hans Passant, GManNickG, dkretz, Muad'Dib Mar 6 '10 at 2:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Many duplicates: stackoverflow.com/questions/1812990/… –  Greg Hewgill Mar 6 '10 at 2:35
3  
Time to ask Jeff for the increment.stackoverflow.com site? –  Hans Passant Mar 6 '10 at 2:39

3 Answers 3

Nothing at all. The increment is a lone statement, so whether it is pre-incremented or post-incremented doesn't matter.

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It only matters if the optimizer isn't clever enough to realize that it can do ++i even though you specified i++. (Which is not very likely in modern compilers.)

You can recognize really old programmers because they always use ++i unless they need to use i++, because once apon a time compilers were a lot less clever.

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Not really to do with age, more to do with exposure to non-trivial iterators in C++. –  Steve Jessop Mar 6 '10 at 3:01
1  
I must be a really old programmer then, because I like to write my code so the results are intentional, not accidental. –  Jon Reid Mar 6 '10 at 4:21

The post- and pre- increment operators matter mainly if you care about the value of some variable in a compound statement. Standalone increment statements, as the third clause of the for loop is, aren't impacted by your choice of pre or post.

int j = i++; and int j = ++i; are very different. Do you want the current value of i or do you want the incremented value of i? In the for loop example, you don't care so long as you increment.

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