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I have multiple threads that share use of a semaphore. Thread A holds the semaphore (using lock) and threads B and C are waiting on that same semaphore (also using lock). The threads share global variables, etc.

Is there a technique in C# that I can use to shut down thread B? I can set a flag in A and have thread B check that flag and exit as soon as it gets control of the semaphore, but I don't know of any technique to allow thread A to yield the semaphore to thread B (and get it back when thread B exits) without the risk of thread C seizing control.

Anyone have any suggestions how to address this design problem? I can rewrite the program as necessary if I am approaching this incorrectly.

[Edit] A commenter has pointed out that I am using the wrong terminology. The commenter is correct - I am using a critical section, but given that everything is running in a single process, in this example critical sections are functionally equivalent to the more general term 'semaphore'.

[Edit] Someone asked for more details, so here it is.

There can be multiple threads executing Code A. There's only ever one thread executing Code B.

Code A:

private static Thread workerThread = null;

lock (lockObject)
{
    ... do some work ...

    if (...condition...)
    {
        if (workerThread != null)
        {
            // Kill the worker thread and continue only after it is dead.
            quitWorkerThread = true;
            // Wait for the thread to die.
            while (workerThread.IsAlive)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(50);
            }
            workerThread = null;
            quitWorkerThread = false;
        } // if (workerThread != null)
    } // if (...condition...)

    ... do some more work ...

    if (...condition...)
    {
        if (workerThread == null)
        {
            // Start the worker thread.
            workerThread = new Thread(WorkerThread);
            workerThread.Start();
        } // if (workerThread == null)
    } // if (...condition...)

    ... do even more work ...

} // lock (lockObject)

Code B:

private void WorkerThread()
{
    while (true)
    {
        if (quitWorkerThread)
        {
            return;
        }

        Thread.Sleep (2000);

        if (quitWorkerThread)
        {
            return;
        }

        lock(lockObject)
        {
            if (quitWorkerThread)
            {
                return;
            }
            ... do some work ...
        } // lock(lockObject)
    } // while (true)
} // WorkerThread

I suspect that a variant of Aaron's solution will be what I use. I was mostly hoping there was somewhat more elegant solution was available, but I suspect that like everything else about this project, it's all brute force and corner cases :-(.

share|improve this question
2  
"Thread A holds the semaphore (using lock)" - the lock statement is a critical section. Are you using semaphores or critical sections (lock)? –  Aaronaught Mar 6 '10 at 3:05
    
If you're using semaphores, you would probably be using waitOne(). –  Zach Mar 6 '10 at 3:06
2  
FYI, a critical section is quite different from a semaphore, even within a single process. A critical section allows exactly one thread to hold a resource; a semaphore may allow several. Locking semantics are also different; a thread can re-enter its own critical section any number of times, but semaphores don't care about thread identity so re-acquiring it too many times will deadlock. Sorry for the pedantry but the distinction is pretty important. –  Aaronaught Mar 6 '10 at 3:29
    
Thanks for the clarification, Aaronnaught. No need to apologize for pedantry, this is computer science, where the devil is in the details, and it's all devil. –  Tom West Mar 6 '10 at 5:36
1  
I think the terminology discrepancy is between general comp sci usage and .NET-specific usage. In .NET, the lock keyword is equivalent to Monitor.Enter(lockObject);try{}finally {Monitor.Exit(lockObject);} so rather than saying a semaphore is held, we say a Monitor or lock is (acquired and then) held. In .NET, "Semaphore" refers to a specific managed wrapper for a Win32 event handle that can be held by a number of separate threads equal to an int value specified at construction. However in general CS "semaphores" are "binary" (like .NET Monitors) or "counting" (like .NET Semaphores). –  G-Wiz Mar 6 '10 at 6:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm fairly certain that there's no way to yield control to a specific thread, which seems to be what you're trying to do. You can only yield, period - it's up to the Windows scheduler to decide what thread gets to run next.

The situation is that you have three threads, A, B, and C. A has the lock, B and C are waiting for it, and you want a way to guarantee that B gets to executed next.

The obvious solution is to use more than one lock and/or sync primitive. You can combine the semantics of lock with a ManualResetEvent. Make thread C wait for both the event and the critical section, but thread B only has to wait for the critical section. Under normal circumstances, you signal the event just before releasing the lock, which leaves it up to the OS to decide which thread to execute. In the special case, you don't signal the event at all, leaving thread B to execute while C is still blocked.

Once B is done, then you signal the event to let C finish.


An (untested) example would be:

// Main thread is Thread A
object myLock = new Object();
AutoResetEvent myEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);
ManualResetEvent completedEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(s =>
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    {
        lock (myLock)
        {
            // Do some work
        }
    }
    completedEvent.Set();
});  // Thread B

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(s =>
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    {
        myEvent.WaitOne();
        lock (myLock)
        {
            // Do some work
        }
    }
});  // Thread C

// Main loop for thread A
while (true)
{
    lock (myLock)
    {
        // Do some work
        if (SomeSpecialCondition)
            break;
        else
            myEvent.Set();
    }
}

completedEvent.WaitOne(); // Wait for B to finish processing
if (SomeSpecialCondition) // If we terminated without signaling C...
    myEvent.Set();        // Now allow thread C to clean up

This essentially puts Thread A in charge of when Thread C gets to execute. Threads A and B will compete normally but it's up to Thread A to signal the event for Thread C.

share|improve this answer
    
Quick note on the side - other people have suggested using bool or int variables for state, which is a valid approach; one of the reasons I used an additional sync primitive instead is because it can cross instance boundaries, whereas checking a bool or using Interlocked is only useful if all the thread methods are in the same class. Also, don't get thrown off by the workCompleted event, it's not strictly necessary, it's just there to help with cleanup at the end if you need to make sure that C runs after B in the final stages. –  Aaronaught Mar 6 '10 at 16:01
    
Thanks to a fellow Torontonian for your (incredibly) prompt and informative answer. It's much appreciated. No wonder you've got >13K points! –  Tom West Mar 7 '10 at 14:34

Take a look at using Monitor and Monitor.Pulse this will not get you exactly what you want in yielding to a specific thread but it will allow you to transfer control between threads and critical sections.

It's not clear to me what problem you are trying to solve. You may also be able to solve your problem using ReaderWriterLockSlim as well.

Lastly your scenerio sounds to me like an appropriate place to use .NET events instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I really don't see how ReaderWriterLockSlim or event delegates apply here, care to be specific? –  Aaronaught Mar 6 '10 at 15:55
    
It all depends on the problem being solved. My thought was that if the problem was a matter of synchronized access to some shared data maybe a ReaderWriterLock would solve the problem instead of using and releasing locks, monitors, etc. If the actual problem was instead a desire to alert various objects when something happens, then events sound like the way to go. As the original question seemed to lack a description of the problem being solved I was trying to cover all the bases. –  Firestrand Mar 7 '10 at 4:27
    
Thank you very much for the pointer to Monitor.Pulse. This was a .NET specific concurrency construct that I was not familiar with. –  Tom West Mar 7 '10 at 14:36

(Disclaimer: If your only use case is that specific one, @Aaronaught's solution of simply using ManualResetEvents is probably the easiest.)

Edited for additional disclaimer: If you want to extend this concept, be very very wary of deadlocks.

If there are situations where you might want C to do work regardless of whether B has done stuff, but always want B to go first if C is waiting, here's one simple solution:

    object lockObject = new object();
    int WaitCounter = 0;

    void B()
    {
        System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment(ref WaitCounter);

        try
        {
            lock (lockObject)
            {
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            System.Threading.Interlocked.Decrement(ref WaitCounter);
        }
    }

    void C()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            // always attempt to yield to other threads first
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(0);
            lock (lockObject)
            {
                if (WaitCounter > 0)
                    continue;

                // ...

                return;
            }
        }
    }

A bunch of extra code, but no one's ever claimed concurrency is easy. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't you be using Interlocked.Read when you pick up the WaitCounter value in C? –  Aaronaught Mar 6 '10 at 15:57
    
@Aaronaught: I don't think you need to for Int32, but I'm not 100% sure... that'd be a good new question to post, actually. :p –  Tanzelax Mar 7 '10 at 5:07
    
@Aaronaught: ...and it's already been asked actually. stackoverflow.com/questions/1186515/interlocked-and-volatile Looks like it's okay without Interlocked.Read. –  Tanzelax Mar 7 '10 at 5:13
    
Thank you for solution and your code. I wasn't familiar with System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment/Decrement (I'm early into .NET programming), so it is another construct to add to my toolbox. Much appreciated! –  Tom West Mar 7 '10 at 14:42

Aaronaught's solution looks sound, but I think a simpler one would be to use a litte more shared state and just a single lock.

Basically you pass control between the threads and the threads decide if it's time for them to work or not. If it's not, they simple PulseAll (move all existing waiting threads into the ready queue) and Wait to (be pulsed and then) get the lock again. At some point, it's decided when ThreadC is good to go.

public class ThreadsGettinCrazy {
  static readonly _sync = new object();
  static bool _threadCReady = false;

  public void ThreadA() {
    while (true) {
      lock(_sync) {
        while(/* my condition not met */) {
          Monitor.PulseAll(_sync);
          Monitor.Wait(_sync);
        }
        // do work, possibly set _threadCReady = true
        Monitor.PulseAll(_sync);
      }
      if (/* i'm done */) break;
    }
  }

  public void ThreadB() {
    while (true) {
      lock(_sync) {
        while(/* my condition not met */) {
          Monitor.PulseAll(_sync);
          Monitor.Wait(_sync);
        }
        // do work, possibly set _threadCReady = true
        Monitor.PulseAll(_sync);
      }
      if (/* i'm done */) break;
    }
  }

  public void ThreadC() {
    lock(_sync) {
      while (!_threadCReady) {
        Monitor.PulseAll(_sync);
        Monitor.Wait(_sync);
      }
      // do work
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for code demonstrating the use of Monitor.Pulse. I am astonished and grateful for your effort and am happily examining all three approaches. Regardless of which one I use, they all will certainly be educational. –  Tom West Mar 7 '10 at 14:39
    
You're welcome! –  G-Wiz Mar 7 '10 at 21:04

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