Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What would be the equivalent of this in C++ of the following snippet. I am in the process converting parts of an java application to C++.

Here is that java class snippet:


class container {
  Public static final Object CONTAINER_FULL = new Object {
     public boolean equals(Object other) {
        // ...
     }
     String toString() {
        // ...
     }
     // ...
  }
  // ...
}

The above class is wrapped in an java interface class "container". The call is ...


public Object fetch_the_object(int at_pos) {
     if (at_pos == MAX) {
        return container.CONTAINER_FULL;
     } 
     // ...
}

What would be the closest equivalent in C++ of that static class and its call?

share|improve this question
    
What is the purpose of the container class? What kind of thing does it represent? What problem is it intended to solve? –  MatrixFrog Mar 6 '10 at 3:08
2  
I'm afraid this doesn't directly translate into C++, which is a very different language. Perhaps if you'd explain what you actually need, then someone could provide C++ code to do that. –  Tronic Mar 6 '10 at 3:11
    
The class where that public static object is located is an interface class. The implementation of that is a class of an array containing strings including NULL at the end of string. Say, the fetch_the_object() returns an item (based on the passed index at_pos) from the array, if the end of end of string (or NULL) is reached) then CONTAINER_FULL Object is returned. The toString() function in that static class return string("end") and the equals method compares the passed object with the this (CONTAINER_FULL) object, if equal, it retuns a CONTAINER_FULL object. –  Andreas W. Wylach Mar 6 '10 at 3:26

2 Answers 2

 class Thing
 {
    public:
      static const OtherThing CONTAINER_FULL;
 };
 const OtherThing Thing::CONTAINER_FULL = blah;

Constant, static, non-integral data types must be defined outside the class body. If you want OtherThing to be anything, change it to

void *
share|improve this answer
2  
Their definitions should also generally be in implementation file (.cc, .cpp) rather than in the header. –  Tronic Mar 6 '10 at 3:25
    
Yes, indeed Tronic. The example here is with brevity in mind, but would certainly work. –  Zach Mar 6 '10 at 3:42
    
And the toString Function would be implemented as an C++ operator<< checking for that object? –  Andreas W. Wylach Mar 6 '10 at 3:52

Something like this, perhaps:

struct Container {
    struct Full {
        ...
    };
    static const Full full;
};
share|improve this answer
    
I think in C++ it would be somekind like a wrapper class arround that array (see my commeent above). Everytime a NULL (end of sentnce) is reached, that object is returned. CONTAINER_FULL in string representation (or that toString method) is "end". But I am not sure yet .... –  Andreas W. Wylach Mar 6 '10 at 3:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.