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In Java

nodes[i] = new Object();

is a valid statement

What is the C++ equivalent?

EDIT:

It seems I am not providing enough context.

I was reading some Java code implementing a QuadTree, and I was curious on how I could rewrite that segment of code in C++.

I did not need a direct equivalent, I wanted something that essentially means the same thing.

In Java, you can do things like

class A
{
public A (someObject o);
}

main method:

A aObject = new A(new someObject());

or in a loop:

for(int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
{
arr[i] = new someObject();
}

In C++ I know you can do:

std::vector<someObject*> arr;
someObject* o = new someObject;
arr.push_back(o);

Is there something similar to java's new Object(); style of creating objects without explicit declaration in C++?

share|improve this question
2  
There is no direct equivalent. It depends on what you want to store in nodes. –  juanchopanza May 28 at 14:11
3  
Learn C++ properly and don't use Java as a guide in writing C++ code. Looking for "equivalences" will just lead down the path of writing awful C++ code. –  PaulMcKenzie May 28 at 14:40
    
@PaulMcKenzie ...unless this is a matter of translating code from Java to C++. Hard to tell without knowing the context. –  Spook May 28 at 14:50
    
@Spook There's no point in "translating" from one language to another. Especially if there is no direct translation. –  juanchopanza May 28 at 14:54
    
@juanchopanza Is it? A lot of sample algorithm implementations are available on the Internet in Java and I had to translate them to C++. And IMO if you really, really need a direct translation, simply implement a base Object class and you're good to go. –  Spook May 28 at 14:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are actually a few aspects regarding your question, depending on what do you really mean by the piece of code you posted.

1. Explicit command

Yes, this command can be issued in C++, for example:

class Object
{

};

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    std::vector<Object *> nodes;
    nodes.push_back(nullptr);
    int i = 0;

    nodes[i] = new Object();

    // To prevent memory leaks
    delete nodes[i];
}

2. Using generic base class, Object

C++ does not have a universal base class such as Object in Java or C#. You have to instantiate something to put it into the array or std::vector. (read more: Root base class in C++)

If you really need such class in your code, you can simply define one, for example:

class Object
{
    virtual std::string ToString()
    {
        return "Object";
    }

    virtual int GetHashCode()
    {
        return (int)this;
    }

    virtual bool Equals(Object & other)
    {
        return this == &other;
    }
};

3. Memory management

In C++ you can explicitly instantiate class at some point.

However, C++ does not have garbage collector working for the dynamic objects such as Java or C#. If you allocate memory explicitly using new operator, you have to delete allocated memory at some point.

On the other hand, C++ tries lately to catch up to high-level languages by providing a set of classes simplifying memory management, such as std::shared_ptr, std::weak_ptr or std::unique_ptr, for example:

class Object
{

};

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Object>> nodes;
    nodes.resize(1);
    int i = 0;

    nodes[i] = std::unique_ptr<Object>(new Object());

    // nodes destructor will call std::unique_ptr<Object>
    // destructor, which will eventually destroy instance
    // of the Object class.
}

Read more here: What is a smart pointer and when should I use one?

4. Indexing arrays, classes

You can always use [] to index arrays. You may use [] to index class instances (such as std::vector) if class supports that (overloads [] operator).

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    // Statically allocated array
    int test[5];
    test[0] = 1;

    // Dynamically allocated array
    // This is useful if you work with
    // some C libraries or simply (really)
    // need to allocate a block of memory.
    int * test2 = new int[5];
    test2[0] = 1;
    delete[test2];

    // This is a lot more C++ way of keeping
    // an array of items:
    std::vector<int> test3;
    test3.resize(1);
    test3[0] = 1;
}
share|improve this answer

Java is a garbage-collected language, while C++ is not. The languages differ so much on what the code above "means", that it is not trivial to quote a direct "equivalent".

A similar method of implementing this in C++, would be to use shared_ptr, which is not garbage collected, but instead ensures that the underlying objects are destroyed when all references to them go out of scope.

#include <vector>
#include <memory>
using namespace std;


class Object
{
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Object>> nodes(1);

    nodes[0] = std::make_shared<Object>();

    return 0;
}
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