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I'm learning C++ and I'm just getting into Virtual Functions/Methods.

From what I've read (in the book and online), Virtual Methods are methods in the a base class that you can override in derived classes.

But earlier in the book, when learning about basic inheritance, I was able to override base methods in derived classes without using virtual.

So what am I missing here? I know there is more to virtual methods and it seems to be important so I want to be clear on what it is exactly. I just can't find a straight answer online.

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2  
Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/2238928/…, although it has an accepted answer with -5 votes. Perhaps we can make that question a duplicate of this one? –  avakar Mar 6 '10 at 7:12

8 Answers 8

up vote 283 down vote accepted

I'm a C++ newbie myself, but here is how I understood not just what virtual functions are, but why they're required:

Let's say you have these two classes:

class Animal
{
public:
void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating generic food."; }
}

class Cat : public Animal
{
public:
void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating a rat."; }
}

In your main function:

Animal *animal = new Animal;
Cat *cat = new Cat;

animal->eat(); // outputs: "I'm eating generic food."
cat->eat();    // outputs: "I'm eating a rat."

So far so good right? Animals eat generic food, cats eat rats, all without virtual.

Let's change it a little now so that eat() is called via an intermediate function (a trivial function just for this example):

//this can go at the top of the main.cpp file
void func(Animal *xyz) { xyz->eat(); }

Now our main function is:

Animal *animal = new Animal;
Cat *cat = new Cat;

func(animal) // outputs: "I'm eating generic food."
func(cat)    // outputs: "I'm eating generic food."

Uh oh...we passed a Cat into func(), but it wont eat rats. Should you overload func() so it takes a Cat* ? If you have to derive more animals from Animal they would all need their own func().

The solution is to make eat() a virtual function:

class Animal
{
public:
virtual void eat() { std::cout << "I'm eating generic food."; }
}

Main:

func(animal) // outputs: "I'm eating generic food."
func(cat)    // outputs: "I'm eating a rat."

Done.

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24  
This answer is much better than the accepted one! It clarifies why you would ever want to declare a virtual function with the use of a nice example. –  Mike Vella Feb 5 at 14:13

Without "virtual" you get "early binding". Which implementation of the method is used gets decided at compile time based on the type of the pointer that you call through.

With "virtual" you get "late binding". Which implementation of the method is used gets decided at run time based on the type of the pointed-to object - what it was originally constructed as. This is not necessarily what you'd think based on the type of the pointer that points to that object.

class Base
{
  public:
            void Method1 ()  {  std::cout << "Base::Method1" << std::endl;  }
    virtual void Method2 ()  {  std::cout << "Base::Method2" << std::endl;  }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
  public:
    void Method1 ()  {  std::cout << "Derived::Method1" << std::endl;  }
    void Method2 ()  {  std::cout << "Derived::Method2" << std::endl;  }
};

Base* obj = new Derived ();
  //  Note - constructed as Derived, but pointer stored as Base*

obj->Method1 ();  //  Prints "Base::Method1"
obj->Method2 ();  //  Prints "Derived::Method2"

EDIT - see this question.

Also - this tutorial covers early and late binding in C++.

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1  
Excellent, and gets home quickly and with the use of better examples. This is however, simplistic, and the questioner should really just read the page parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/virtual-functions.html. Other folks have already pointed to this resource in SO articles linked from this thread, but I believe this is worth re-mentioning. –  Sonny Jun 8 '12 at 13:06
    
I assume: Base* obj = new Base(); obj->Method2(); would print "Base::Method2" -- yes? –  Lotus Mar 21 at 2:06
    
@Lotus - yes. In that case, the pointer type matches the original type the object was constructed as, so early vs. late binding makes no difference. –  Steve314 Mar 21 at 3:47

You need at least 1 level of inheritance and a downcast to demonstrate it. Here is a very simple example:

class Animal
{        
    public: 
      // turn the following virtual modifier on/off to see what happens
      //virtual   
      std::string Says() { return "?"; }  
};

class Dog: public Animal
{
    public: std::string Says() { return "Woof"; }
};

void test()
{
    Dog* d = new Dog();
    Animal* a = d;       // refer to Dog instance with Animal pointer

    cout << d->Says();   // always Woof
    cout << a->Says();   // Woof or ?, depends on virtual
}
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24  
Your example says that the returned string depends on whether the function is virtual, but it doesn't say which result corresponds to virtual and which corresponds to non-virtual. Additionally, it's a little confusing as you're not using the string that's being returned. –  Ross Mar 6 '10 at 11:10
4  
@Ross: that leaves something for the reader to explore. But I'll edit a little. –  Henk Holterman Mar 6 '10 at 11:37
20  
This is a demonstration, not an explanation. –  Bob Blogge Jul 18 '13 at 16:43
3  
With Virtual keyword: Woof. Without Virtual keyword: ?. –  Hesham Eraqi Nov 11 '13 at 11:14
3  
@puk - then please downvote and post a better one. –  Henk Holterman Dec 3 '13 at 8:04

If the base class is Base, and a derived class is Der, you can have a Base *p pointer which actually points to an instance of Der. When you call p->foo();, if foo is not virtual, then Base's version of it executes, ignoring the fact that p actually points to a Der. If foo is virtual, p->foo() executes the "leafmost" override of foo, fully taking into account the actual class of the pointed-to item. So the difference between virtual and non-virtual is actually pretty crucial: the former allow runtime polymorphism, the core concept of OO programming, while the latter don't.

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2  
I hate to contradict you, but compile-time polymorphism is still polymorphism. Even overloading non-member functions is a form of polymorphism - ad-hoc polymorphism using the terminology in your link. The difference here is between early and late binding. –  Steve314 Mar 6 '10 at 8:04
2  
@Steve314, you're pedantically correct (as a fellow pedant, I approve that;-) -- editing the answer to add the missing adjective;-). –  Alex Martelli Mar 6 '10 at 16:56
1  
Pedantically correct is the only real correct. Anything else is just wrong and stupid. I've tried to explain to people how wrong and stupid they are. I could certainly help a lot of people by explaining precisely how wrong and stupid they are and how to be more superior, like me, but for some reason they won't stop hitting me! How stupid is that! –  Steve314 Mar 7 '10 at 0:07
1  
@Steve314 you're either superior or not, you can't become "more superior." Just saying... –  mosawi May 20 at 20:35

It helps if you know the underlying mechanisms. C++ formalizes some coding techniques used by C programmers, "classes" replaced using "overlays" - structs with common header sections would be used to handle objects of different types but with some common data or operations. Normally the base struct of the overlay (the common part) has a pointer to a function table which points to a different set of routines for each object type. C++ does the same thing but hides the mechanisms i.e. the C++ ptr->func(...) where func is virtual as C would be (*ptr->func_table[func_num])(ptr,...), where what changes between derived classes is the func_table contents. [A non-virtual method ptr->func() just translates to mangled_func(ptr,..).]

The upshot of that is that you only need to understand the base class in order to call the methods of a derived class, i.e. if a routine understands class A, you can pass it a derived class B pointer then the virtual methods called will be those of B rather than A since you go through the function table B points at.

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You have to distinguish between overriding and overloading. Without the virtual keyword you only overload a method of a base class. This means nothing but hiding. Let's say you have a base class Base and a derived class Specialized which both implement void foo(). Now you have a pointer to Base pointing to an instance of Specialized. When you call foo() on it you can observe the difference that virtual makes: If the method is virtual, the implementation of Specialized will be used, if it is missing, the version from Base will be chosen. It is best practice to never overload methods from a base class. Making a method non-virtual is the way of its author to tell you that its extension in subclasses is not intended.

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When you have a function in the base class, you can Redefine or Override it in the derived class.

Redefining a method : A new implementation for the method of base class is given in the derived class. Does not facilitate Dynamic binding.

Overriding a method: Redefining a virtual method of the base class in the derived class. Virtual method facilitates Dynamic Binding.

So when you said :

But earlier in the book, when learning about basic inheritance, I was able to override base methods in derived classes without using 'virtual'.

you were not overriding it as the method in the base class was not virtual, rather you were redefining it

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You need virtual methods for safe downcasting, simplicity and conciseness.

That’s what virtual methods do: they downcast safely, with apparently simple and concise code, avoiding the unsafe manual casts in the more complex and verbose code that you otherwise would have.


Non-virtual method ⇒ static binding

The following code is intentionally “incorrect”. It doesn’t declare the value method as virtual, and therefore produces an unintended “wrong” result, namely 0:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Expression
{
public:
    auto value() const
        -> double
    { return 0.0; }         // This should never be invoked, really.
};

class Number
    : public Expression
{
private:
    double  number_;

public:
    auto value() const
        -> double
    { return number_; }     // This is OK.

    Number( double const number )
        : Expression()
        , number_( number )
    {}
};

class Sum
    : public Expression
{
private:
    Expression const*   a_;
    Expression const*   b_;

public:
    auto value() const
        -> double
    { return a_->value() + b_->value(); }       // Uhm, bad! Very bad!

    Sum( Expression const* const a, Expression const* const b )
        : Expression()
        , a_( a )
        , b_( b )
    {}
};

auto main() -> int
{
    Number const    a( 3.14 );
    Number const    b( 2.72 );
    Number const    c( 1.0 );

    Sum const       sum_ab( &a, &b );
    Sum const       sum( &sum_ab, &c );

    cout << sum.value() << endl;
}

In the line commented as “bad” the Expression::value method is called, because the statically known type (the type known at compile time) is Expression, and the value method is not virtual.


Virtual method ⇒ dynamic binding.

Declaring value as virtual in the statically known type Expression ensures that the each call will check what actual type of object this is, and call the relevant implementation of value for that dynamic type:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Expression
{
public:
    virtual
    auto value() const -> double
        = 0;
};

class Number
    : public Expression
{
private:
    double  number_;

public:
    auto value() const -> double
        override
    { return number_; }

    Number( double const number )
        : Expression()
        , number_( number )
    {}
};

class Sum
    : public Expression
{
private:
    Expression const*   a_;
    Expression const*   b_;

public:
    auto value() const -> double
        override
    { return a_->value() + b_->value(); }    // Dynamic binding, OK!

    Sum( Expression const* const a, Expression const* const b )
        : Expression()
        , a_( a )
        , b_( b )
    {}
};

auto main() -> int
{
    Number const    a( 3.14 );
    Number const    b( 2.72 );
    Number const    c( 1.0 );

    Sum const       sum_ab( &a, &b );
    Sum const       sum( &sum_ab, &c );

    cout << sum.value() << endl;
}

Here the output is 6.86 as it should be, since the virtual method is called virtually. This is also called dynamic binding of the calls. A little check is performed, finding the actual dynamic type of object, and the relevant method implementation for that dynamic type, is called.

The relevant implementation is the one in the most specific (most derived) class.

Note that method implementations in derived classes here are not marked virtual, but are instead marked override. They could be marked virtual but they’re automatically virtual. The override keyword ensures that if there is not such a virtual method in some base class, then you’ll get an error (which is desirable).


The ugliness of doing this without virtual methods

Without virtual one would have to implement some Do It Yourself version of the dynamic binding. It’s this that generally involves unsafe manual downcasting, complexity and verbosity.

For the case of a single function, as here, it suffices to store a function pointer in the object and call via that function pointer, but even so it involves some unsafe downcasts, complexity and verbosity, to wit:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Expression
{
protected:
    typedef auto Value_func( Expression const* ) -> double;

    Value_func* value_func_;

public:
    auto value() const
        -> double
    { return value_func_( this ); }

    Expression(): value_func_( nullptr ) {}     // Like a pure virtual.
};

class Number
    : public Expression
{
private:
    double  number_;

    static
    auto specific_value_func( Expression const* expr )
        -> double
    { return static_cast<Number const*>( expr )->number_; }

public:
    Number( double const number )
        : Expression()
        , number_( number )
    { value_func_ = &Number::specific_value_func; }
};

class Sum
    : public Expression
{
private:
    Expression const*   a_;
    Expression const*   b_;

    static
    auto specific_value_func( Expression const* expr )
        -> double
    {
        auto const p_self  = static_cast<Sum const*>( expr );
        return p_self->a_->value() + p_self->b_->value();
    }

public:
    Sum( Expression const* const a, Expression const* const b )
        : Expression()
        , a_( a )
        , b_( b )
    { value_func_ = &Sum::specific_value_func; }
};


auto main() -> int
{
    Number const    a( 3.14 );
    Number const    b( 2.72 );
    Number const    c( 1.0 );

    Sum const       sum_ab( &a, &b );
    Sum const       sum( &sum_ab, &c );

    cout << sum.value() << endl;
}

One positive way of looking at this is, if you encounter unsafe downcasting, complexity and verbosity as above, then often a virtual method or methods can really help.

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