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I was watching a Youtube video where some stud demonstrates different algorithms for finding the median of 2 sorted arrays: algorithm detailed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_H50Ir-Tves. I'm trying to implement his "Comparing Medians" algorithm and running into a fence post problem or something. I decided that I should just define the "median" as element N/2 in an array of N elements. My implementation is overall messy and not working out.

Here's the function I'm using to compare my other function against:

template <typename T>
T M2SA_Dumb(std::vector<T> A, std::vector<T> B)
{

    if (A.size() == 0 || B.size() == 0)
        throw std::invalid_argument("Can't find median of 2 sorted arrays if both are empty!");
    std::vector<T> AB;
    AB.reserve(A.size() + B.size());
    AB.insert(AB.end(), A.begin(), A.end());
    AB.insert(AB.end(), B.begin(), B.end());
    sort(AB.begin(), AB.end());
    return (AB[AB.size() / 2]);
}

And here's my non-working function that I'm trying to debug:

template <typename T>
T M2SA_Smart(const std::vector<T> & A, const std::vector<T> & B)
{
    size_t m(A.size()), n(B.size());
    T retval;
    size_t sizeval = (m > 0 ? 1 : 0) + 2 * (n > 0 ? 1 : 0);
    switch (sizeval)
    {
    case 0: // A, B empty
        throw std::invalid_argument("Can't find median of 2 sorted arrays if both are empty!");
        break;
    case 1: // A non-empty, B empty
        retval = A[m / 2];
        break;
    case 2: // A empty, B non-empty
        retval = B[n / 2];
        break;
    default: // A, B non-empty
        size_t medidx = (m + n) / 2;
        if (A[m - 1] <= B[0])
        {
            if (medidx >= m)
            {
                retval = B[medidx - m];
            }
            else
            {
                retval = A[medidx];
            }
        }
        else if (B[n - 1] <= A[0])
        {
            if (medidx >= n)
            {
                retval = A[medidx - n];
            }
            else
            {
                retval = B[medidx];
            }
        }
        else
        {
            size_t a1(0), a2(m - 1), b1(0), b2(n - 1);
            T M1(A[(a2 - a1) / 2]), M2(B[(b2 - b1) / 2]);
            while (a1 != a2 && b1 != b2)
            {
                if (M1 == M2)
                {
                    retval = M1;
                    break;
                }
                else if (M1 < M2)
                {
                    a1 = (a2 - a1) / 2;
                    b2 = (b2 - b1) / 2;
                }
                else
                {
                    a2 = (a2 - a1) / 2;
                    b1 = (b2 - b1) / 2;
                }
                M1 = A[(a2 - a1) / 2];
                M2 = B[(b2 - b1) / 2];
            }
            retval = std::max(M1, M2);
        }
        break;
    }
    return retval;
}

I think the problem is in the recursive portion

    {
        size_t a1(0), a2(m - 1), b1(0), b2(n - 1);
        T M1(A[(a2 - a1) / 2]), M2(B[(b2 - b1) / 2]);
        while (a1 != a2 && b1 != b2)
        {
            if (M1 == M2)
            {
                retval = M1;
                break;
            }
            else if (M1 < M2)
            {
                a1 = (a2 - a1) / 2;
                b2 = (b2 - b1) / 2;
            }
            else
            {
                a2 = (a2 - a1) / 2;
                b1 = (b2 - b1) / 2;
            }
            M1 = A[(a2 - a1) / 2];
            M2 = B[(b2 - b1) / 2];
        }
        retval = std::max(M1, M2);
    }

There's something screwy going on. Any idea what it is???

For some additional info,

I tested

std::vector<int> v1 = { 1, 1, 69, 111, 124 };
std::vector<int> v2 = { 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130 };

and got

M2SA_Dumb(v1, v2) = 80 (the right answer)

and

M2SA_Dumb(v1, v2) = 40 (the wrong answer)

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3  
You should seriously consider changing your user name. –  Ali May 28 at 20:33
    
When trimming elements from the vectors in the recursive part of the algorithm the number of elements removed from each vector needs to be the same. So if x elements are removed from the first part of one vector, then x elements are removed from the last part of the other vector. The logic needs to handle the case when the vectors are different sizes. Rather than recursively creating new vectors, it would be faster to use indices for the beginning and end of each vector. –  rcgldr May 29 at 1:48

1 Answer 1

The algorithm shown in the video is meant to work with two arrays or vectors of the same size. Also the median for an array of an even number of elements is usually defined as the average value of the two middle elements (so it may be a floating point value ending in .5).

Link to a more generic algorithm for arrays of different sizes:

median of different size sorted arrays

I'm not sure this is practical. An array or vector of 4 million 64 bit integers can be sorted in less than 1 second on most current PC's using merge sort or quick sort. std::merge of two sorted arrays or vectors or std::list::merge of two sorted lists would take a small fraction of a second.

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