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I need a regular expression that only validates an IPv6 address in Javascript. I have tried the following two which both fail on a string like 1:1:1:1:1:1:1:1

^([\dA-F]{1,4}:|((?=.*(::))(?!.*\3.+\3))\3?)([\dA-F]{1,4}(\3|:\b)|\2){5}(([\dA-F]{1,4}(\3|:\b|$)|\2){2}|(((2[0-4]|1\d|[1-9])?\d|25[0-5])\.?\b){4})\z

^([0-9A-Fa-f]{0,4}:){2,7}([0-9A-Fa-f]{1,4}$|((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)(\.|$)){4})$
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@ElliottFrisch I don't think your link is a duplicate. The answers are for C# in that question, unless I misread them. –  xxbbcc May 28 '14 at 20:09
    
@xxbbcc: In particular, this answer of that question. –  Bill Lynch May 28 '14 at 20:10
    
@sharth You could be right - I haven't looked through every single answer. –  xxbbcc May 28 '14 at 20:15
    
Why is this question voted down? –  user3037683 Jul 10 '14 at 20:45

1 Answer 1

up vote -2 down vote accepted

here you go

[0-9a-fA-F].{0,3}+:[0-9a-fA-F].{0,3}+:[0-9a-fA-F].{0,3}+:[0-9a-fA-F].{0,3}+:[0-9a-fA-F].{0,3}+:[0-9a-fA-F].{0,3}+:[0-9a-fA-F].{0,3}+:[0-9a-fA-F].{0,3}

oops, forgot to set it to a max of 4 per segment.

Note that there are spcific combinations for ip address where some are not valid. But this will fit your requirment.

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1  
-1 : your regex fails to accept ::1 which is the IPv6 loopback address. –  xxbbcc May 28 '14 at 20:11
    
Are you sure that you want the dots between the [...] and the {...}? –  Bill Lynch May 28 '14 at 20:14
    
Fixed issue from sharth's comment, thanks. I don't know regular expression enough to fix the issue noted in xxbbcc''ss comment –  Joseph Dailey May 28 '14 at 20:15
    
@JosephDailey IPv6 addresses are fairly complex. I wouldn't use a regex to check them but a proper parser. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6_address –  xxbbcc May 28 '14 at 20:16
    
I know how ipv6 works to an extent but when validating that somthing is 64bit hex values separated by colons, this would suffice. –  Joseph Dailey May 28 '14 at 20:47

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