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I have a C program sending data as fast as it can using the sendto() method from the sender to the receiver which receives with recvfrom() method. The data is encapsulated into layer 2 Ethernet frames and the application is writing Ethernet frames directly on to the wire (no TCP or UDP or even IP). This is on x86_64 Linux (dev machines are just stock Ubuntu 14.04). I have no intention of porting to any other OS, the application design scope is for Linux so other OSes don't matter.

Sender:

    while (true)
    {
        sendResult = sendto(sockFD, txBuffer, fSize+headersLength, 0,
            (struct sockaddr*)&socket_address, sizeof socket_address);
    }

Receiver:

    while (true)
    {
        recvfrom(sockFD, rxBuffer, fSizeTotal, 0, NULL, NULL);
    }

I want the sender to be able to check for received packets; should the receiver application quit it sends data back to the sender saying "I quit" so the sender will stop sending data. I used poll() on the sender to check for received messages as below but this significantly reduces the transmission speed from just shy of 1Gbps (968Mbps) to around 10Mbps. I'm testing with a cross-over cable between two PCs with 1Gbps NICs. The sender counts sent frames and the frame size and the receiver counts received frames and the frame size, so to confirm, the application is actually receiving at wire-rate near enough, I'm not just look at NIC utilization or similar.

Poll() Method:

int rv;
struct pollfd ufds[1];
ufds[0].fd = sockFD;
ufds[0].events = POLLIN


while (true)
{
    sendResult = sendto(sockFD, txBuffer, fSize+headersLength, 0, (struct sockaddr*)&socket_address, sizeof(socket_address));

    // wait for events on the sockets, 1ms timeout
    rv = poll(ufds, 1, 1);

    if (rv > 0) {
        if (ufds[0].revents & POLLIN) {
            recvfrom(sockFD, rxBuffer, fSizeTotal, 0, NULL, NULL);
        }
    }

}

1 millisecond is the lowest timeout that can be set for the poll() method. This is why my transmission program could only transmit at 10Mbps. The application can easily saturate a 1Gbps link though with minimal CPU usage, I was getting 968Mbps as I previously stated (I don't mean peak by the way, that is sustained throughput).

I removed the poll() call and switched to select() using the below example, but again, using the smallest delay I can here my transmission application could only get 175Mbps. Not close to the original 968Mbps;

Select() Method:

fd_set readfds;
struct timeval tv;
int rv, n;

FD_ZERO(&readfds);
FD_SET(sockFD, &readfds);
n = sockFD + 1;


while (true)
{
    sendResult = sendto(sockFD, txBuffer, fSize+headersLength, 0, (struct sockaddr*)&socket_address, sizeof(socket_address));

    tv.tv_sec = 0;
    tv.tv_usec = 000001;
    rv = select(n, &readfds, NULL, NULL, &tv);
    if (rv > 0) {
        if (FD_ISSET(sockFD, &readfds)) {
            recvfrom(sockFD, rxBuffer, fSizeTotal, 0, NULL, NULL);
    }

}

It seems that both methods are too slow for today’s systems (my cpu usage was around 2% for all tests above). I wish to move this application on to some 10GigE machines soon and start testing there but I obviously can't using either of these two methods. Is there no faster way I can check?

I though these were supposed to be non-blocking but by requiring a timeout they are blocking in a way; I have seen this thread but it isn't the answer I require. Is there no method I can simply call that checks at that moment in time it was called, for data waiting to be read, then returns immediately if no data is waiting to be read?

As a side node, I haven't read up on the recvfrom method() to see where the delay is yet before posting this but I did try the following because it only took 30 seconds to change the code, it resulted in the worst outcome which was less than 1Mbps;

Sender:

    while (true)
    {
        // Continually send a frame then check for a frame, send a frame then check for a frame...
        sendResult = sendto(sockFD, txBuffer, fSize+headersLength, 0, (struct sockaddr*)&socket_address, sizeof(socket_address));
        recvfrom(sockFD, rxBuffer, fSizeTotal, 0, NULL, NULL);
    }
share|improve this question
    
If you want flow control, you should consider using TCP. You haven't indicated what the protocol is, but is there a reason you went with TCP? –  Jonathon Reinhart May 28 '14 at 22:23
    
I will add that in, I'm using Ethernet directly writing the frames at layer 2 onto the wire. I thought recvfrom best for that, rather than recv()? –  jwbensley May 28 '14 at 22:24
1  
@jwbensley In the Linux kernel, I believe they all boil down the same API regardless. What is the protocol like? Is the source just blasting out data as fast as he can? At that point maybe the receiver doesn't have to receive every packet - if this is some sort of time-varying signal, the receiver only cares about as many updates as he can consume. –  Jonathon Reinhart May 28 '14 at 22:27
1  
I suspect @AShelly has the right of it. It looks to me as if the slowdown is due to the fact that the same sockFD has to "stop and listen". If you employed two different packet sockets, one of them could idle listening for the receiver, and you'd just need to check on it every now and then. –  lserni May 28 '14 at 22:55
2  
You know you can wait legally use tv_secs = 0 and tv_usec = 0 right? –  Duck May 28 '14 at 23:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no requirement for poll or select to block for any period of time. If the timeout parameters for poll or select are set to zero both calls return immediately with indications of i/o availability. This eliminates engaging the timer and subsequent rounding.

Note, it is not clear to me why this would be substantially faster than a simple non-blocking polling read if you are only monitoring one file descriptor. I would have expected any benefits from this approach to begin to accrue when multiple FDs were in play so it is interesting that your testing uncovered this.

share|improve this answer
    
This works just fine with only a slight increase in CPU usage. –  jwbensley Jun 22 '14 at 19:38

I wouldn't use non-blocking mode at all. Just dedicate a thread in blocking mode. That way you're only doing one system call: recvfrom(), so you're saving context switches into the kernel.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is the correct answer. –  R.. May 29 '14 at 0:22
    
B..b..but you canot say that! Evenybody knows that you HAVE to use non-blocking sockets for purrformance and scalabilty! This is heresy! :) –  Martin James May 29 '14 at 9:50

As you figured, the reason your performance suffered is because you limited yourself to sending no more than 1000 packets per second.

If you are willing to use two threads, then EJP's answer is the best option. If you really only want to use a single thread, the best option is to use select() or poll() to let you know if there is something to do at the point when your transmit queue is saturated. So, you can set your socket into non-blocking mode, or you can use the MSG_DONTWAIT flag when doing your I/O. Stop doing that I/O when you get the EAGAIN/EWOULDBLOCK notification, and then do a blocking wait for the appropriate event in select() or poll() again (do not set a timeout). In pseudocode with simplified error handling:

writeable = true;
readable = false;
make_nonblock(s);
for (;;) {
    if (readable) {
        while (recvfrom(s,...) > 0) {
            done = done_check();
        }
        if (done) break;
        assert(errno == EAGAIN);
        readable = false;
    }
    if (writeable) {
        while (sendto(s,...) > 0) {}
        assert(errno == EAGAIN);
        writeable = false;
    }
    poll_socket(s, &readable, &writeable);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Making the port non-blocking whilst performing a constant transmission as in my original post while (true) { sendto(sockFD); } has the problem that the program tries to send data faster then a NIC physically can. My receiving application continues to report a bit less than 1Gbps when using a cross-over cable between two test machines with gigabit NICs but the transmitting application reports 5000Mbps, as fast as that CPU core can run the loop. –  jwbensley Jun 22 '14 at 19:36
    
I never suggested doing that. The problem is that the sending machine will chew up CPU even if the send buffer is full. The answer you picked was basically a late and less complete explanation of this answer. –  jxh Jun 22 '14 at 20:43

You could try looking at the discussions around the C10k problem for some information.

I think you could try epoll but that's more for many connections rather than single socket throughput. It'll be interesting to see what results you get from using it though.

share|improve this answer
2  
The information on that site is outdated/discredited. I can't find the citation right now, but nginx showed that you can handle at least 80k connections with select and 200k with poll. "C10k" was just the magic imaginary boundary that turned out to be a result of the poor design of Apache and other competitors at the time, not any fundamental limit. –  R.. May 29 '14 at 0:21
    
Hardware and software have both improved, but the case where epoll() and kqueue() will perform much better than the older interfaces is when at any point in time a small percentage of the very large number of connections are actually truly active. –  jxh May 29 '14 at 2:00

It may be helpful to put the select in another thread.

Thread 1:

while (gRunning)
{
   sendResult = sendto(...)
}

Thread 2:

rv = select(n, &readfds, NULL, NULL, &tv);
if (rv > 0) {
    if (FD_ISSET(sockFD, &readfds)) {
        recvfrom(sockFD, rxBuffer, fSizeTotal, 0, NULL, NULL);
        if (!strcmp(rxBuffer,"I QUIT")) {
            gRunning = FALSE;
        }
    }
}

The select thread should yield to the CPU while waiting, likely giving your sender more cycles.

share|improve this answer
    
Using more threads can actually decrease performance significantly, burning more cycles and lowering throughput. Especially often noted when going from single-threaded to multi-threaded. Determine where the bottle-neck lies. –  Deduplicator May 28 '14 at 22:45
    
In theory, a long timeout for select should prevent its thread from getting scheduled until an incoming message arrives. So it might have less overhead then interspersing the writes and selects in the same thread. –  AShelly May 28 '14 at 23:25
    
@AShelly I upvoted for the helpful suggestion although at this point I am trying to avoid a multi-threaded scenario. –  jwbensley May 29 '14 at 11:45
1  
If it's a question, it's not an answer. –  EJP Aug 11 '14 at 1:43
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 11 '14 at 3:08

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