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I've heard that session_start() needs to be called before the !DOCTYPE, but I am confused about other session functions. From the manual:

"To use a named session, call session_name() before calling session_start()."

So, I obviously have to have the session_name() function before the <!DOCTYPE html>, but what other functions do I need before the html begins? I'm pretty sure that $_SESSION[''] is okay inside the html, but I would just like to clarify.

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1  
One purpose of having session_start() before any PHP output is to ensure the header that would set the session cookie is handled correctly. you can do anything you want with $_SESSION at any time, add to it, read it, clear it. –  Scuzzy May 28 '14 at 22:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As far i know (assuming that you are coding in PHP) you can not set response headers after you start writing the response body.

So anything the is related to the headers of the response must be setted before start writing the body of response (for example : html elements, that are writed in the response body).

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The session_start() function must always be called first before anything else in the document and the $_SESSION superglobal can be used anywhere in the document. It's basically just an array of data.

A basic example for a session validation:

if (isset($_SESSION['username']) === true) {
    echo "Hello: ".$_SESSION['username'];
} else {
    header('Location: http://www.yourdomainname.com/login.php');
}
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I don't know about which session functions have to be called before the <!DOCTYPE>, but I can say that $_SESSION is a superglobal, a variable and that is why you can access it everywhere in your script. It is an array.

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If you dont know the answer, its best not to give an answer. What the 2 upvotes are for I cannot imagine. –  RiggsFolly May 28 '14 at 22:58
    
Actually it is a partial response clarifying the $_SESSION[''] as a variable, not a function. Forgive me for trying to bring some help. –  AlixB May 28 '14 at 23:01
    
To be precise its an array. –  RiggsFolly May 28 '14 at 23:05

The session_name() function is not actually required as the name should be generated by PHP automatically.

However, you should start your session in all your scripts using the session_start(). This should be one of the first thing you do in any script that wants to use session functionality. Like this.

<?php
    session_start();
?>
<!DOCTYPE html>

 .... other html

<?php
   if ( ! isset($_SESSION['is_logged_in']) || $_SESSION['is_logged_in'] === false ) {
      // send user to login page
   }
   .. some other bits of php code
?>

 .... other html

<?php
   .. some other bits of php code
?>
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What do you mean the session name is generated by PHP automatically? How do I access it then? –  BestAnswer May 28 '14 at 22:38
    
there is file named like "sess_*" with some crazy letters (like "sess_b2gbflcq7iv6bt51hi3iqp4f82"). If you user WAMP, LAMP or XAMP. Probably see it under the directory "\tmp" on the root of the WAMP/LAMP/XAMP instalation. There goes all the session information that maintains the server with a browser. –  Victor May 28 '14 at 22:48
    
Seems quite a simple statement to me. The php.ini file usually contains this parameter session.name = PHPSESSID so thats the default session name. I have never found any reason to change it. –  RiggsFolly May 28 '14 at 22:49

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