Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been drawing Venn diagrams, coding loops and different sets(symmetrical_differences, unions, intersection, isdisjoint), enumerating by row numbers for the better part of a day or two trying to figure out how to implement this in code.

a = [1, 2, 2, 3] # <-------------|
b = [1, 2, 3, 3, 4] # <----------| Do not need to be in order.
result = [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4] # <--|

OR:

A = [1,'d','d',3,'x','y']
B = [1,'d',3,3,'z']
result =  [1,'d','d',3,3,'x','y','z']

edit:

Not trying to do a + b = [1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4]

Trying to do something like:

a - b = [2]

b - a = [3, 4]

a ∩ b = [1,2,3]

So

[a - b] + [b - a] + a ∩ b = [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4] ?

I am not sure here.

I have two spread sheets, each with several thousand lines. I want to compare both spreadsheets by a column type.

I have created lists from each column to compare/merge.

def returnLineList(fn):
    with open(fn,'r') as f:
        lines = f.readlines()
    line_list = []
    for line in lines:
        line = line.split('\t')
        line_list.append(line)
    return line_list

def returnHeaderIndexDictionary(titles):
    tmp_dict = {}
    for x in titles:
        tmp_dict.update({x:titles.index(x)})
    return tmp_dict

def returnColumn(index, l):
    column = []
    for row in l:
        column.append(row[index])
    return column

def enumList(column):
    tmp_list = []
    for row, item in enumerate(column):
        tmp_list.append([row,item])
    return tmp_list

def compareAndMergeEnumerated(L1,L2):
    less = []
    more = []
    same = []
    for row1,item1 in enumerate(L1):
        for row2,item2 in enumerate(L2):
            if item1 in item2:
                count1 = L1.count(item1)
                count2 = L2.count(item2)
                dif = count1 - count2
                if dif != 0:
                    if dif < 0:
                        less.append(["dif:"+str(dif),[item1,row1],[item2,row2]])
                    if dif > 0:
                        more.append(["dif:"+str(dif),[item1,row1],[item2,row2]])
                else:
                    same.append(["dif:"+str(dif),[item1,row1],[item2,row2]])
                break
    return less,more,same,len(less+more+same),len(L1),len(L2)

def main():
    unsorted_lines = returnLineList('unsorted.csv')
    manifested_lines = returnLineList('manifested.csv')

    indexU = returnHeaderIndexDictionary(unsorted_lines[0])
    indexM = returnHeaderIndexDictionary(manifested_lines[0])

    u_j_column = returnColumn(indexU['jnumber'],unsorted_lines)
    m_j_column = returnColumn(indexM['jnumber'],manifested_lines)

    print(compareAndMergeEnumerated(u_j_column,m_j_column))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

update:

from collections import OrderedDict
A = [1,'d','d',3,'x','y']
B = [1,'d',3,3,'z']
M = A + B
R = [1,'d','d',3,3,'x','y','z']


ACount = {}
AL = lambda x: ACount.update({str(x):A.count(x)})
[AL(x) for x in A]

BCount = {}
BL = lambda x: BCount.update({str(x):B.count(x)})
[BL(x) for x in B]

MCount = {}
ML = lambda x: MCount.update({str(x):M.count(x)})
[ML(x) for x in M]


RCount = {}
RL = lambda x: RCount.update({str(x):R.count(x)})
[RL(x) for x in R]


print('^sym_difAB',set(A) ^ set(B)) # set(A).symmetric_difference(set(B))
print('^sym_difBA',set(B) ^ set(A)) # set(A).symmetric_difference(set(B))
print('|union    ',set(A) | set(B)) # set(A).union(set(B))
print('&intersect',set(A) & set(B)) # set(A).intersection(set(B))
print('-dif AB   ',set(A) - set(B)) # set(A).difference(set(B))
print('-dif BA   ',set(B) - set(A)) 
print('<=subsetAB',set(A) <= set(B)) # set(A).issubset(set(B))
print('<=subsetBA',set(B) <= set(A)) # set(B).issubset(set(A))
print('>=supsetAB',set(A) >= set(B)) # set(A).issuperset(set(B))
print('>=supsetBA',set(B) >= set(A)) # set(B).issuperset(set(A))

print(sorted(A + [x for x in (set(A) ^ set(B))]))
#[1, 3, 'd', 'd', 'x', 'x', 'y', 'y', 'z']

print(sorted(B + [x for x in (set(A) ^ set(B))]))
#[1, 3, 3, 'd', 'x', 'y', 'z', 'z']
cA = lambda y: A.count(y)
cB = lambda y: B.count(y)
cM = lambda y: M.count(y)
cR = lambda y: R.count(y)
print(sorted([[y,cA(y)] for y in (set(A) ^ set(B))]))
#[['x', 1], ['y', 1], ['z', 0]]

print(sorted([[y,cB(y)] for y in (set(A) ^ set(B))]))
#[['x', 0], ['y', 0], ['z', 1]]

print(sorted([[y,cA(y)] for y in A]))
print(sorted([[y,cB(y)] for y in B]))
print(sorted([[y,cM(y)] for y in M]))
print(sorted([[y,cR(y)] for y in R]))
#[[1, 1], [3, 1], ['d', 2], ['d', 2], ['x', 1], ['y', 1]]
#[[1, 1], [3, 2], [3, 2], ['d', 1], ['z', 1]]
#[[1, 2], [1, 2], [3, 3], [3, 3], [3, 3], ['d', 3], ['d', 3], ['d', 3], ['x', 1], ['y', 1], ['z', 1]]
#[[1, 1], [3, 2], [3, 2], ['d', 2], ['d', 2], ['x', 1], ['y', 1], ['z', 1]]

cAL = sorted([[y,cA(y)] for y in A])

enter image description here

update: 2

Basically I think it is time for me to learn:

It looks like a combination of aggregation, groupby, and summing.

share|improve this question
    
You are re-implementing the wheel in much of your code. Python already has a Set type, and implements all set operations for you. Also can you explain your first example more in detail? Why do three 2s appear twice in the result? –  Martin Konecny May 28 '14 at 23:28
    
I believe I have thoroughly responded to the specific nature of your question. If I have answered your question, please accept by clicking the checkmark next to my answer. If I haven't, please tell me what is lacking. :) –  Aaron Hall May 28 '14 at 23:48
    
I do believe my second answer provides the result you were looking for. Please accept if you find it agreeable. –  Aaron Hall May 29 '14 at 3:08
1  
I see you've added in another case with mixed types, ints with strs, and Python 3 won't sort them, so you'll need to convert the ints into strs before processing them as I've suggested. You'll also need to convert lists into tuples so they can be hashed by the set (which stores them as a hash lookup, so all must be hashable). I'm not going to add more material here on that though, but I think you can handle. –  Aaron Hall May 29 '14 at 4:10
    
fyi, I improved the second function to handle mixed types (i.e. strs and ints). –  Aaron Hall May 31 '14 at 20:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After further review (and experimentation with a Python interpreter now that I'm home), I see what you're trying to do, but it contradicts your title about removing duplicates. I see you're viewing each additional element as a new indexed unique item.

This is conceptually similar to the decorate, sort, undecorate pattern, just substitute the term "sort" with "join" or "set operation".

So here's a setup, first import itertools so we can group each like element and enumerate them into a set:

import itertools

def indexed_set(a_list):
    '''
    assuming given a sorted list, 
    groupby like items, 
    and index from 0 for each group
    return a set of tuples with like items and their index for set operations
    '''
    return set((like, like_index) for _like, like_iter in itertools.groupby(a_list)
                          for like_index, like in enumerate(like_iter))

Later we'll need to convert the set with indexes back to a list:

def remove_index_return_list(an_indexed_set):
    '''
    given a set of two-length tuples (or other iterables)
    drop the index and 
    return a sorted list of the items 
    (sorted by str() for comparison of mixed types)
    '''
    return sorted((item for item, _like_index in an_indexed_set), key=str)

Finally, we need our data (taken from the data you provided):

a = [1, 2, 2, 3] 
b = [1, 2, 3, 3, 4] 
expected_result = [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4]

And here's my proposed usage:

a_indexed = indexed_set(a)
b_indexed = indexed_set(b)
actual_result = remove_index_return_list(a_indexed | b_indexed)

assert expected_result == actual_result

does not raise an AssertionError, and

print(actual_result)

prints:

[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4]

EDIT: Since I made the functions handle mixed cases, I figured I'd demo:

c = [1,'d','d',3,'x','y']
d = [1,'d',3,3,'z']
expected_result =  [1,'d','d',3,3,'x','y','z']
c_indexed = indexed_set(c)
d_indexed = indexed_set(d)
actual_result = remove_index_return_list(c_indexed | d_indexed)
assert actual_result == expected_result

And we see we don't have exactly what we expect, but pretty close due to sorting:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AssertionError
>>> actual_result
[1, 3, 3, 'd', 'd', 'x', 'y', 'z']
>>> expected_result
[1, 'd', 'd', 3, 3, 'x', 'y', 'z']
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that is it! I was almost there, i just saw the pattern i was looking for! –  jmunsch May 29 '14 at 3:34
    
What would be the best fitting title for this question? –  jmunsch May 29 '14 at 3:40
    
A better title would be something like "Preserving identical list elements for set manipulation" –  Aaron Hall May 29 '14 at 3:52

So you're asking how to remove duplicate elements and keep unique ones? You definitely need sets for that:

When you say this:

(a - b) + (b - a)

What you want is this

set(a) ^ set(b)

Which is the symmetric difference of the two.

If your elements are lists, you won't be able to hash them (a prerequisite for a set element), so you need to convert them to tuples:

set(tuple(i) for i in a) ^ set(tuple(i) for i in b)

EDIT

Now that you've edited your question, you appear to be looking for this:

(a - b) + (b - a) + a ∩ b

Which is the union of the two sets (assuming you mean the union of the sets by +, else you would mean the intersection, which would be the null set, and this ambiguity is the reason sets do not support the + operator):

set(tuple(i) for i in a) | set(tuple(i) for i in b)

The above returns the equivalent to the end result of my_set using the in-place function, union:

my_set = set(tuple(i) for i in a) 
my_set.union(tuple(i) for i in b)
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your help, but it isn't exactly a union, as it only keeps the difference of b? I am not sure what the notation is, or how to explain it exactly. –  jmunsch May 28 '14 at 23:48
    
@jmunsch Please see the documentation, it is the union. docs.python.org/2/library/sets.html I'll explain in the body of the answer. –  Aaron Hall May 28 '14 at 23:49
    
Apologies I shouldn't have used ( and ) the lists are not tuples. –  jmunsch May 29 '14 at 0:13

No need to learn pandas yet! (Although it's a really excellent library.) I'm not sure if I understand your problem exactly but the collections.Counter data type is designed to act as a bag/multiset. One of the operators implemented is "or" which might be what you need. Read the comments in this code example and see if it fits your needs:

a = [1, 2, 2, 3]
b = [1, 2, 3, 3, 4]

from collections import Counter

# A Counter data type counts the elements fed to it and holds
# them in a dict-like type.

a_counts = Counter(a) # {1: 1, 2: 2, 3: 1}
b_counts = Counter(b) # {1: 1, 2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 1}

# The union of two Counter types is the max of each value
# in the (key, value) pairs in each Counter. Similar to
# {(key, max(a_counts[key], b_counts[key])) for key in ...}

result_counts = a_counts | b_counts

# Return an iterator over the keys repeating each as many times as its count.

result = list(result_counts.elements())

# Result:
# [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4]
share|improve this answer

I think the test case in the problem statement is not enough, for example, suppose

a = [1, 2, 2, 3, 2, 2, 3] b = [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 3, 5]

shall we merge the two into [1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 3, 5], or [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5]? This will definitely change the algorithm you are going to implement.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.