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So we have a code running that is creating a mips processor. The issue is we instantiate the original PC to a 32 bit std logic vector containing all 0s. The code to initiate this is below.

process (reset_N) 
begin 
   if (reset_N'event and reset_N = '1' ) then 
      pc_in <= "00000000000000000000000000000000";
   end if ;
end process; 

The issue is no matter what value reset_N carries (it only has 1 for the first 40 ns ) it will always pass the 0's into pc_in resulting in a conflict.

We commented the pc_in line of code out and received no conflicts, so we are confident this is the issue. We are just unsure why these checks aren't functioning properly.

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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Can this potentially have something to do with the active low signal naming convention? –  Randy May 29 '14 at 5:18
    
You mention a conflict, so please show the code where the conflict occurs. Sounds like you try to reset the PC, and in that case the reset_N should be part of the process that generates the PC. –  Morten Zilmer May 29 '14 at 7:50
1  
What Morten is intimating is that conflicts typically come from resolution of multiple drivers, where you have two or more different processes, concurrent statements or combination driving the same signal. Multiple drivers get resolved (non-resolved types will complain about multiple drivers). The way to cure these 'conflicts' is to drive a signal from a single process or other concurrent statement. might also display declarations as well as more context. A process has a single driver. –  David Koontz May 29 '14 at 11:02
    
Thank you for the help! I believe that's the issue, I'll double check tomorrow once I may test it. I will post the code where the input is also modified, to see if you can notice the conflict. However, I was under the impression this code would end once the process ended...but it seems constant. Anyways I'll post it once I have access to it again. Thank you for your time, Please check back later! I've been on a deadline for a android release and it's 4:40 am here. I need to get some rest first. :/ –  Randy May 29 '14 at 11:42

1 Answer 1

As Morten and David pointed out, you probably have two separate processes for setting pc_in, which is causing the conflict.

Since you're trying to detect a reset edge, not just a reset level, I assume you're trying to create a sequential process so that you have a registered version of pc_in. If so, there are a couple of ways to do that. You can detect the reset synchronously or asynchronously. Below are a couple of examples.

-- Registered version of pc_in with synchronous reset
process(clk)
begin
  if (rising_edge(clk)) then
    if (reset_N = '0') then
      pc_in <= (others => '0');
    else
      pc_in <= (others => '1');
    end if;
  end if;
end process;

-- Registered version of pc_in with asynchronous reset
process(clk, reset_N)
begin
  if (reset_N = '0') then
    pc_in <= (others => '0');
  elsif (rising_edge(clk)) then
    pc_in <= (others => '1');
  end if;
end process;
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