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I want to see all the different ways you can come up with, for a factorial subroutine, or program. The hope is that anyone can come here and see if they might want to learn a new language.

Ideas:

  • Procedural
  • Functional
  • Object Oriented
  • One liners
  • Obfuscated
  • Oddball
  • Bad Code
  • Polyglot

Basically I want to see an example, of different ways of writing an algorithm, and what they would look like in different languages.

Please limit it to one example per entry. I will allow you to have more than one example per answer, if you are trying to highlight a specific style, language, or just a well thought out idea that lends itself to being in one post.

The only real requirement is it must find the factorial of a given argument, in all languages represented.

Be Creative!

Recommended Guideline:

# Language Name: Optional Style type

   - Optional bullet points

    Code Goes Here

Other informational text goes here

I will ocasionally go along and edit any answer that does not have decent formatting.

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129 Answers 129

Lisp recursive:

(defun factorial (x) 
   (if (<= x 1) 
       1 
       (* x (factorial (- x 1)))))
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JavaScript Using anonymous functions:

var f = function(n){
  if(n>1){
    return arguments.callee(n-1)*n;
  }
  return 1;
}
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C: One liner, procedural

int f(int n) { for (int i = n - 1; i > 0; n *= i, i--); return n ? n : 1; }

I used int's for brevity; use other types to support larger numbers.

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Here is an interesting Ruby version. On my laptop it will find 30000! in under a second. (It takes longer for Ruby to format it for printing than to calculate it.) This is significantly faster than the naive solution of just multiplying the numbers in order.

def factorial (n)
  return multiply_range(1, n)
end

def multiply_range(n, m)
  if (m < n)
    return 1
  elsif (n == m)
    return m
  else
    i = (n + m) / 2
    return multiply_range(n, i) * multiply_range(i+1, m)
  end
end
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1  
This is not faster. What is the number of recursive calls for a given n? Additionally your solution is O(n) in space. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 19 '08 at 14:36

Scala: Recursive

  • Should compile to being tail recursive. Should!

.

def factorial( value: BigInt ): BigInt = value match {
  case 0 => 1
  case _ => value * factorial( value - 1 )
}
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Occam-pi

PROC subprocess(MOBILE CHAN INT parent.out!,parent.in?)
INT value:
  SEQ
    parent.in ? value
      IF 
        value = 1
          SEQ
            parent.out ! value
        OTHERWISE
          INITIAL MOBILE CHAN INT child.in IS MOBILE CHAN INT:
          INITIAL MOBILE CHAN INT child.out IS MOBILE CHAN INT:
          FORKING
            INT newvalue:
            SEQ
              FORK subprocess(child.in!,child.out?)
              child.out ! (value-1)
              child.in ? newvalue
              parent.out ! (newalue*value)
:

PROC main(CHAN BYTE in?,src!,kyb?)
INITIAL INT value IS 0:
INITIAL MOBILE CHAN INT child.out is MOBILE CHAN INT
INITIAL MOBILE CHAN INT child.in is MOBILE CHAN INT
SEQ 
  WHILE TRUE
    SEQ
      subprocess(child.in!,child.out?)
      child.out ! value
      child.in ? value
      src ! value:
      value := value + 1
:
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OCaml

Lest anyone believe OCaml and oddball go hand-in-hand, I thought I would provide a sane implementation of factorial.

# let rec factorial n =
    if n=0 then 1 else n * factorial(n - 1);;

I don't think I made my case very well...

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Genuinely functional Java:

public final class Factorial {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    final int n = Integer.valueOf(args[0]);
    System.out.println("Factorial of " + n + " is " + create(n).apply());
  }

  private static Function create(final int n) {
    return n == 0 ? new ZeroFactorialFunction() : new NFactorialFunction(n);
  }

  interface Function {
    int apply();
  }

  private static class NFactorialFunction implements Function {
    private final int n;
    public NFactorialFunction(final int n) {
      this.n = n;
    }
    @Override
    public int apply() {
      return n * Factorial.create(n - 1).apply();
    }
  }

  private static class ZeroFactorialFunction implements Function {
    @Override
    public int apply() {
      return 1;
    }
  }

}
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C# factorial using recursion in a single line

private static int factorial(int n){ if (n == 0)return 1;else return n * factorial(n - 1); }
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Python, C/C++ (weave): Multi-Language, Procedural

Four implementations:

  • [weave]
  • [python]
  • [psyco]
  • [list]

Code:

#!/usr/bin/env python
""" weave_factorial.py

"""
# [weave] factorial() as extension module in C++
from scipy.weave import ext_tools

def build_factorial_ext():
    func = ext_tools.ext_function(
        'factorial', 
        r"""
        unsigned long long i = 1;
        for ( ; n > 1; --n)
          i *= n;

        PyObject *o = PyLong_FromUnsignedLongLong(i);
        return_val = o;
        Py_XDECREF(o); 
        """,  
        ['n'], 
        {'n': 1}, # effective type declaration
        {})
    mod = ext_tools.ext_module('factorial_ext')
    mod.add_function(func)
    mod.compile()

try: from factorial_ext import factorial as factorial_weave
except ImportError:
    build_factorial_ext()
    from factorial_ext import factorial as factorial_weave


# [python] pure python procedural factorial()
def factorial_python(n):
    i = 1
    while n > 1:
        i *= n
        n -= 1
    return i


# [psyco] factorial() psyco-optimized
try:
    import psyco
    factorial_psyco = psyco.proxy(factorial_python)
except ImportError:
    pass


# [list] list-lookup factorial()
factorials = map(factorial_python, range(21))   
factorial_list = lambda n: factorials[n]


Measure relative performance:

$ python -mtimeit \
         -s "from weave_factorial import factorial_$label as f" "f($n)"
  1. n = 12

    • [weave] 0.70 µsec (2)
    • [python] 3.8 µsec (9)
    • [psyco] 1.2 µsec (3)
    • [list] 0.43 µsec (1)
  2. n = 20

    • [weave] 0.85 µsec (2)
    • [python] 9.2 µsec (21)
    • [psyco] 4.3 µsec (10)
    • [list] 0.43 µsec (1)

µsec stands for microseconds.

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dc

Note: clobbers the e and f registers:

[2++d]se[d1-d_1<fd0>e*]sf

To use, put the value you want to take the factorial of on the top of the stack and then execute lfx (load the f register and execute it), which then pops the top of the stack and pushes that value's factorial.

Explanation: if the top of the stack is x, then the first part makes the top of the stack look like (x, x-1). If the new top-of-stack is non-negative, it calls factorial recursively, so now the stack is (x, (x-1)!) for x >= 1, or (0, -1) for x = 0. Then, if the new top-of-stack is negative, it executes 2++d, which replaces the (0, -1) with (1, 1). Finally, it multiplies the top two values on the stack.

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R - using S4 methods (recursively)

setGeneric( 'fct', function( x ) { standardGeneric( 'fct' ) } )
setMethod( 'fct', 'numeric', function( x ) { 
    lapply( x, function(a) { 
        if( a == 0 ) 1 else a * fact( a - 1 ) 
    } )
} )

Has the advantage that you can pass arrays of numbers in, and it will work them all out...

eg:

> fct( c( 3, 5, 6 ) )
[[1]]
[1] 6

[[2]]
[1] 120

[[3]]
[1] 720
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Iswim/Lucid:

factorial = 1 fby factorial * (time+1);

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Python, one liner:

A bit more clean than the other python answer. This, and the previous answer, will fail if the input is less than 1.

def fact(n): return reduce(int.mul,xrange(2,n))

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Factor

USE: math.ranges

: factorial ( n -- n! ) 1 [a,b] product ;

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In MUMPS:

fact(N)
  N F,I S F=1 F  I=2:1:N S F=F*I
  QUIT F

Or, if you're a fan of indirection:

fact(N)
  N F,I S F=1 F I=2:1:N S F=F_"*"_I
  QUIT @F
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ActionScript: Procedural/OOP

function f(n) {
    var result = n>1 ? arguments.callee(n-1)*n : 1;
    return result;
}
// function call
f(3);
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Common Lisp

  • Call it by name: !
  • Tail recursive
  • Common Lisp handles arbitrarily large numbers
(defun ! (n)
  "factorial"
  (labels ((fac (n prod)
             (if (zerop n)
                 prod
                 (fac (- n 1) (* prod n)))))
    (fac n 1)))

edit: or with accumulator as optional parameter:

(defun ! (n &optional prod)
  "factorial"
  (if (zerop n)
      prod
      (! (- n 1) (* prod n))))

or as a reduce, at the cost of a bigger memory footprint and more consing:

(defun range (start end &optional acc)
  "range from start inclusive to end exclusive, start = start end)
      (nreverse acc)
      (range (+ start 1) end (cons start acc))))

(defun ! (n)
  "factorial"
  (reduce #'* (range 1 (+ n 1))))
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Hmm... no TCL

proc factorial {n} {
  if { $n == 0 } { return 1 }
  return [expr {$n*[factorial [expr {$n-1}]]}]
}
puts [factorial 6]

But of course that doesn't work for a damn for large values of n.... we can do better with tcllib!

package require math::bignum
proc factorial {n} {
  if { $n == 0 } { return 1 }
  return [ ::math::bignum::tostr [ ::math::bignum::mul [
    ::math::bignum::fromstr $n] [ ::math::bignum::fromstr [
      factorial [expr {$n-1} ]
    ]]]]
}
puts [factorial 60]

Look at all those ]'s at the end. This is practically LISP!

I'll leave the version for values of n>2^32 as an excersize for the reader

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Mathematica, Memoized

f[n_ /; n < 2] := 1
f[n_] := (f[n] = n*f[n - 1])

Mathematica supports n! natively, but this shows how to make definitions on the fly. When you execute f[2], this code will make a definition f[2]=2 which will subsequently be executed no differently than if you'd hard-coded it; no need for an internal data structure; you just use the language's own function definition machinery.

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Lisp : tail-recursive

(defun factorial(x)
  (labels((f (x acc)
             (if (> x 1)
                 (f (1- x)(* x acc))
                 acc)))
         (f x 1)))
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Another ruby one.

class Integer
  def fact
    return 1 if self.zero?
    (1..self).to_a.inject(:*)
  end
end

This works if to_proc is supported on symbols.

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REBOL

Math is definitely not one of REBOL's strong points, since it lacks arbitrary precision integers. For the sake of completeness, I thought I'd add it anyway.

Here's a standard, naïve recursive implementation:

fac: func [ [catch] n [integer!] ] [
    if n < 0 [ throw make error! "Hey dummy, your argument was less than 0!" ]
    either n = 0 [ 1 ] [
        n * fac (n - 1)
    ]
]

And that's about it. Move along, folks, nothing to see here ... :)

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Here's my proposal. Runs in Mathematica, works fine:

gen[f_, n_] := Module[{id = -1, val = Table[Null, {n}], visit},
  visit[k_] := Module[{t},
    id++; If[k != 0, val[[k]] = id];
    If[id == n, f[val]];
    Do[If[val[[t]] == Null, visit[t]], {t, 1, n}];
    id--; val[[k]] = Null;];
  visit[0];
  ]

Factorial[n_] := Module[{res=0}, gen[res++&, n]; res]

Update Ok, here's how it works: the visit function is from Sedgewick's Algorithm book, it "visits" all permutations of length n. Upon the visit, it calls function f with the permutation as an argument.

So, Factorial enumerates all permutations of length n, and for each permutation the counter res is increased, thus computing n! in O(n+1)! time.

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Python:

def factorial(n):
    return reduce(lambda x, y: x * y,range(1, n + 1))
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SETL

...where Haskell and Python borrowed their list comprehensions from.

proc factorial(n);
    return 1 */ {1..n};
end factorial;

And the built-in INTEGER type is arbitrary-precision, so this will work for any positive n.

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Befunge:

0&>:1-:v v *_$.@ 
  ^    _$>\:^
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CLOS

I see Common Lisp solutions abusing recursion, LOOP, and even FORMAT. I guess it's time for somebody to write a solution that abuses CLOS!

(defgeneric factorial (n))
(defmethod factorial ((n (eql 0))) 1)
(defmethod factorial ((n integer)) (* n (factorial (1- n))))

(Can your favorite language's object system dispatcher do that?)

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Golfscript: designed for golfing, of course

~),1>{*}*
  • ~ evaluates the input string (to an integer)
  • ) increments the number
  • , is range (4, becomes [0 1 2 3])
  • 1> selects values whose index is 1 or bigger
  • {*}* folds multiplication over the list
  • Stack contents are printed when the program terminates.

To run:

echo 5 | ruby gs.rb fact.gs
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Oh fork() its another example in Perl

This will make use of your multiple core CPUs... although perhaps not in the most effective manner. The open statement clones the process with fork and opens a pipe from the child process to the parent. The work of multiplying numbers 2 at a time is split among a tree of very short lived processes. Of course, this example is a bit silly. The point is that if you actually had more difficult calculations to do then this example illustrates one way to divide up the work in parallel.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use bigint;

print STDOUT &main::rangeProduct(1,$ARGV[0])."\n";

sub main::rangeProduct {
    my($l, $h) = @_;
    return $l    if ($l==$h);
    return $l*$h if ($l==($h-1));
    # arghhh - multiplying more than 2 numbers at a time is too much work
    # find the midpoint and split the work up :-)
    my $m = int(($h+$l)/2);
    my $pid = open(my $KID, "-|");
      if ($pid){ # parent
        my $X = &main::rangeProduct($l,$m);
        my $Y = <$KID>;
        chomp($Y);
        close($KID);
        die "kid failed" unless defined $Y;
        return $X*$Y;
      } else {
        # kid
        print STDOUT &main::rangeProduct($m+1,$h)."\n";
        exit(0);
    }
}
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