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I want to see all the different ways you can come up with, for a factorial subroutine, or program. The hope is that anyone can come here and see if they might want to learn a new language.

Ideas:

  • Procedural
  • Functional
  • Object Oriented
  • One liners
  • Obfuscated
  • Oddball
  • Bad Code
  • Polyglot

Basically I want to see an example, of different ways of writing an algorithm, and what they would look like in different languages.

Please limit it to one example per entry. I will allow you to have more than one example per answer, if you are trying to highlight a specific style, language, or just a well thought out idea that lends itself to being in one post.

The only real requirement is it must find the factorial of a given argument, in all languages represented.

Be Creative!

Recommended Guideline:

# Language Name: Optional Style type

   - Optional bullet points

    Code Goes Here

Other informational text goes here

I will ocasionally go along and edit any answer that does not have decent formatting.

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locked by Will Mar 16 '12 at 20:24

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129 Answers 129

Common Lisp: Lisp as God intended it to be used (that is, with LOOP)

(defun fact (n)
  (loop for i from 1 to n
        for acc = 1 then (* acc i)
        finally (return acc)))

Now, if someone can come up with a version based on FORMAT...

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Common Lisp: FORMAT (obfuscated)

Okay, so I'll give it a try myself.

(defun format-fact (stream arg colonp atsignp &rest args)
  (destructuring-bind (n acc) arg
    (format stream
            "~[~A~:;~*~/format-fact/~]"
            (1- n)
            acc
            (list (1- n) (* acc n)))))

(defun fact (n)
  (parse-integer (format nil "~/format-fact/" (list n 1))))

There has to be a nicer, even more obscure FORMAT-based implementation. This one is pretty straight-forward and boring, simply using FORMAT as an IF replacement. Obviously, I'm not a FORMAT expert.

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AWK

#!/usr/bin/awk -f
{
    result=1;
    for(i=$1;i>0;i--){
        result=result*i;
    }
    print result;
}
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#Language: T-SQL, C#
#Style: Custom Aggregate

Another crazy way would be to create a custom aggregate and apply it over a temporary table of the integers 1..n.

/* ProductAggregate.cs */
using System;
using System.Data.SqlTypes;
using Microsoft.SqlServer.Server;

[Serializable]
[SqlUserDefinedAggregate(Format.Native)]
public struct product {
  private SqlDouble accum;
  public void Init() { accum = 1; }
  public void Accumulate(SqlDouble value) { accum *= value; }
  public void Merge(product value) { Accumulate(value.Terminate()); }
  public SqlDouble Terminate() { return accum; }
}

add this to sql

create assembly ProductAggregate from 'ProductAggregate.dll' with permission_set=safe -- mod path to point to actual dll location on disk.

create aggregate product(@a float) returns float external name ProductAggregate.product

create the table (there should be a built-in way to do this in SQL -- hmm. a question for SO?)

select 1 as n into #n union select 2 union select 3 union select 4 union select 5

then finally

select dbo.product(n) from #n
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#Language: T-SQL
#Style: Big Numbers

Here's another T-SQL solution -- supports big numbers in a most Rube Goldbergian manner. Lots of set-based ops. Tried to keep it uniquely SQL. Horrible performance (400! took 33 seconds on a Dell Latitude D830)

create function bigfact(@x varchar(max)) returns varchar(max) as begin
  declare @c int
  declare @n table(n int,e int)
  declare @f table(n int,e int)

  set @c=0
  while @c<len(@x) begin
    set @c=@c+1
    insert @n(n,e) values(convert(int,substring(@x,@c,1)),len(@x)-@c)
  end

  -- our current factorial
  insert @f(n,e) select 1,0

  while 1=1 begin
    declare @p table(n int,e int)
    delete @p
    -- product
    insert @p(n,e) select sum(f.n*n.n), f.e+n.e from @f f cross join @n n group by f.e+n.e

    -- normalize
    while 1=1 begin
      delete @f
      insert @f(n,e) select sum(n),e from (
        select (n % 10) as n,e from @p union all 
        select (n/10) % 10,e+1 from @p union all 
        select (n/100) %10,e+2 from @p union all 
        select (n/1000)%10,e+3 from @p union all 
        select (n/10000) % 10,e+4 from @p union all 
        select (n/100000)% 10,e+5 from @p union all 
        select (n/1000000)%10,e+6 from @p union all 
        select (n/10000000) % 10,e+7 from @p union all 
        select (n/100000000)% 10,e+8 from @p union all 
        select (n/1000000000)%10,e+9 from @p
      ) f group by e having sum(n)>0

      set @c=0
      select @c=count(*) from @f where n>9
      if @c=0 break
      delete @p
      insert @p(n,e) select n,e from @f
    end

    -- decrement
    update @n set n=n-1 where e=0

    -- normalize
    while 1=1 begin
      declare @e table(e int)
      delete @e
      insert @e(e) select e from @n where n<0
      if @@rowcount=0 break

      update @n set n=n+10 where e in (select e from @e)
      update @n set n=n-1 where e in (select e+1 from @e)
    end  

    set @c=0
    select @c=count(*) from @n where n>0
    if @c=0 break
  end

  select @c=max(e) from @f
  set @x=''
  declare @l varchar(max)
  while @c>=0 begin
    set @l='0'
    select @l=convert(varchar(max),n) from @f where e=@c
    set @x=@x+@l
    set @c=@c-1
  end
  return @x
end

Example:

print dbo.bigfact('69')

returns:

171122452428141311372468338881272839092270544893520369393648040923257279754140647424000000000000000
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Javascript:

factorial = function( n )
{
   return n > 0 ? n * factorial( n - 1 ) : 1;
}

I'm not sure what a Factorial is but that does what the other programs do in javascript.

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Ruby: Iterative

def factorial(n)
  (1 .. n).inject{|a, b| a*b}
end

Ruby: Recursive

def factorial(n)
  n == 1 ? 1 : n * factorial(n-1)
end
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Haskell:

factorial n = product [1..n]
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Eiffel


class
    APPLICATION
inherit
    ARGUMENTS

create
    make

feature -- Initialization

    make is
            -- Run application.
        local
            l_fact: NATURAL_64
        do
            l_fact := factorial(argument(1).to_natural_64)
            print("Result is: " + l_fact.out)
        end

    factorial(n: NATURAL_64): NATURAL_64 is
            --
        require
            positive_n: n >= 0
        do
            if n = 0 then
                Result := 1
            else
                Result := n * factorial(n-1)
            end
        end

end -- class APPLICATION
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befunge-93

                                    v
>v"Please enter a number (1-16) : "0<
,:             >$*99g1-:99p#v_.25*,@
^_&:1-99p>:1-:!|10          < 
         ^     <

An esoteric language by Chris Pressey of Cat's Eye Technologies.

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J

   fact=. verb define
*/ >:@i. y
)
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Smalltalk, memoized

Define a method on Dictionary

Dictionary >> fac: x
    ^self at: x ifAbsentPut: [ x * (self fac: x - 1) ]

usage

 d := Dictionary new.
 d at: 0 put: 1.
 d fac: 24
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Smalltalk, 1-Liner

(1 to: 24) inject: 1 into: [ :a :b | a * b ]
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Smalltalk, using a closure

    fac := [ :x | x = 0 ifTrue: [ 1 ] ifFalse: [ x * (fac value: x -1) ]].

    Transcript show: (fac value: 24) "-> 620448401733239439360000"

NB does not work in Squeak, requires full closures.

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Perl (Y-combinator/Functional)

print sub {
  my $f = shift;
  sub {
    my $f1 = shift;
    $f->( sub { $f1->( $f1 )->( @_ ) } )
  }->( sub {
    my $f2 = shift;
    $f->( sub { $f2->( $f2 )->( @_ ) } )
  } )
}->( sub {
  my $h = shift;
  sub {
    my $n = shift;
    return 1 if $n <=1;
    return $n * $h->($n-1);
  }
})->(5);

Everything after 'print' and before the '->(5)' represents the subroutine. The factorial part is in the final "sub {...}". Everything else is to implement the Y-combinator.

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Mathematica: non-recursive

fact[n_] := Times @@ Range[n]

Which is syntactic sugar for Apply[Times, Range[n]]. I think that's the best way to do it, not counting the built-in n!, of course. Note that that automatically uses bignums.

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Common Lisp version:

(defun ! (n) (reduce #'* (loop for i from 2 below (+ n 1) collect i)))

Seems to be quite fast.

* (! 42)

1405006117752879898543142606244511569936384000000000
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1  
Why don't you loop for i from 2 upto n, instead of from 2 below (+ n 1)? –  Svante Jan 11 '09 at 0:57

Delphi iterative

While recursion can be the only decent solution to a problem, for factorials it is not. To describe it, yes. To program it, no. Iteration is cheapest.

This function calculates factorials for somewhat larger arguments.

function Factorial(aNumber: Int64): String;
var
  F: Double;
begin
  F := 0;
  while aNumber > 1 do begin
    F := F + log10(aNumber);
    dec(aNumber);
  end;
  Result := FloatToStr(Power(10, Frac(F))) + ' * 10^' + IntToStr(Trunc(F));
end;

1000000! = 8.2639327850046 * 10^5565708

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Python:

Recursive

def fact(x): 
    return (1 if x==0 else x * fact(x-1))

Using iterator

import operator

def fact(x):
    return reduce(operator.mul, xrange(1, x+1))
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Logo

? to factorial :n
> ifelse :n = 0 [output 1] [output :n * factorial :n - 1]
> end

And to invoke:

? print factorial 5
120

This is using the UCBLogo dialect of logo.

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Perl, pessimal:

# Because there are just so many other ways to get programs wrong...
use strict;
use warnings;

sub factorial {
    my ($x)=@_;

    for(my $f=1;;$f++) {
        my $tmp=$f;
        foreach my $g (1..$x) {
           $tmp/=$g;
        }
        return $f if $tmp == 1;
    }
}

I trust I get extra points for not using the '*' operator...

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Perl 6: Functional

multi factorial ( Int $n where { $n <= 0 } ){
  return 1;
}
multi factorial ( Int $n ){
   return $n * factorial( $n-1 );
}

This will also work:

multi factorial(0) { 1 }
multi factorial(Int $n) { $n * factorial($n - 1) }

Check Jonathan Worthington's journal on use.perl.org, for more information about the last example.

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*NIX Shell

Linux version:

seq -s'*' 42 | bc

BSD version:

jot -s'*' 42 | bc
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FORTH, iterative 1 liner

: FACT 1 SWAP 1 + 1 DO I * LOOP ;
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Scheme evolution

Regular Scheme program:

(define factorial
   (lambda (n)
     (if (= n 0)
         1
         (* n (factorial (- n 1))))))

Should work, but notice that calling this function on large numbers will extend the stack on every recursion, which is bad in languages like C and Java.

Continuation-passing style

(define factorial
  (lambda (n)
    (factorial_cps n (lambda (k) k))))

(define factorial_cps
  (lambda (n k)
    (if (zero? n)
        (k 1)
        (factorial (- n 1) (lambda (v)
                             (k (* n v)))))))

Ah, this way, we don't grow our stack every recursion because we can extend a continuation instead. However, C doesn't have continuations.

Representation-independent CPS

(define factorial
  (lambda (n)
    (factorial_cps n (k_))))

(define factorial_cps
  (lambda (n k)
    (if (zero? n)
        (apply_k 1)
        (factorial (- n 1) (k_extend n k))))

(define apply_k
  (lambda (ko v)
    (ko v)))
(define kt_empty
  (lambda ()
    (lambda (v) v)))
(define kt_extend 
  (lambda ()
    (lambda (v)
      (apply_k k (* n v)))))

Notice that responsibility for representation of the continuations used in the original CPS program has been shifted to the kt_ helper procedures.

Representation-independent CPS using ParentheC unions

Since representation of the continuations is in the helper procedures, we can switch to using ParentheC instead, with kt_ being a type designator.

(define factorial
  (lambda (n)
    (factorial_cps n (kt_empty))))

(define factorial_cps
  (lambda (n k)
    (if (zero? n)
        (apply_k 1)
        (factorial (- n 1) (kt_extend n k))))

(define-union kt
  (empty)
  (extend n k))
(define apply_k
  (lambda ()
    (union-case kh kt
      [(empty) v]
      [(extend n k) (begin
                      (set! kh k)
                      (set! v (* n v))
                      (apply_k))])))

Trampolined, registerized ParentheC program

That's not enough. We now replace all function calls by instead setting global variables and a program counter. Procedures are now labels suitable for GOTO statements.

(define-registers n k kh v)
(define-program-counter pc)

(define-label main
  (begin
    (set! n 5) ; what is the factorial of 5??
    (set! pc factorial_cps)
    (mount-trampoline kt_empty k pc)
    (printf "Factorial of 5: ~d\n" v)))

(define-label factorial_cps
  (if (zero? n)
      (begin
        (set! kh k)
        (set! v 1)
        (set! pc apply_k))
      (begin
        (set! k (kt_extend n k))
        (set! n (- n 1))
        (set! pc factorial_cps))))

(define-union kt
  (empty dismount) ; get off the trampoline!
  (extend n k))

(define-label apply_k
  (union-case kh kt
    [(empty dismount) (dismount-trampoline dismount)]
    [(extend n k) (begin
                    (set! kh k)
                    (set! v (* n v))
                    (set! pc apply_k))]))

Oh look, we have a main procedure now too. Now all that's left to do is save this file as fact5.pc and run it through ParentheC's pc2c:

> (load "pc2c.ss")
> (pc2c "fact5.pc" "fact5.c" "fact5.h")

Could it be? We got fact5.c and fact5.h. Let's see...

$ gcc fact5.c -o fact5
$ ./fact5
Factorial of 5: 120

Success! We have converted a recursive Scheme program into a non-recursive C program! And it only took several hours and many forehead-shaped impressions in the wall to do it! For convenience, fact5.c and and fact5.h.

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C++

factorial(int n)
{
    for(int i=1, f = 1; i<=n; i++)
        f *= i;
    return f;
}
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Java: functional

int factorial(int x) {
    return x == 0 ? 1 : x * factorial(x-1);
}
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Haskell: Functional

 fact 0 = 1
 fact n = n * fact (n-1)
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This one not only calculates n!, it is also O(n!). It may have problems if you want to calculate anything "big" though.

long f(long n)
{
    long r=1;
    for (long i=1; i<n; i++)
        r=r*i;
    return r;
}

long factorial(long n)
{
    // iterative implementation should be efficient
    long result;
    for (long i=0; i<f(n); i++)
        result=result+1;
    return result;
}
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Bourne Shell: Functional

factorial() {
  if [ $1 -eq 0 ]
  then
    echo 1
    return
  fi

  a=`expr $1 - 1`
  expr $1 \* `factorial $a`
}

Also works for Korn Shell and Bourne Again Shell. :-)

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