Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to see all the different ways you can come up with, for a factorial subroutine, or program. The hope is that anyone can come here and see if they might want to learn a new language.

Ideas:

  • Procedural
  • Functional
  • Object Oriented
  • One liners
  • Obfuscated
  • Oddball
  • Bad Code
  • Polyglot

Basically I want to see an example, of different ways of writing an algorithm, and what they would look like in different languages.

Please limit it to one example per entry. I will allow you to have more than one example per answer, if you are trying to highlight a specific style, language, or just a well thought out idea that lends itself to being in one post.

The only real requirement is it must find the factorial of a given argument, in all languages represented.

Be Creative!

Recommended Guideline:

# Language Name: Optional Style type

   - Optional bullet points

    Code Goes Here

Other informational text goes here

I will ocasionally go along and edit any answer that does not have decent formatting.

share

locked by Will Mar 16 '12 at 20:24

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

129 Answers 129

C/C++: Procedural

unsigned long factorial(int n)
{
    unsigned long factorial = 1;
    int i;

    for (i = 2; i <= n; i++)
    	factorial *= i;

    return factorial;
}

PHP: Procedural

function factorial($n)
{
    for ($factorial = 1, $i = 2; $i <= $n; $i++)
    	$factorial *= $i;

    return $factorial;
}

@Niyaz: You didn't specify return type for the function

share

The problem with most of the above is that they will run out of precision at about 25! (12! with 32 bit ints) or just overflow. Here's a c# implementation to break through these limits!

class Number
{
  public Number ()
  {
    m_number = "0";
  }

  public Number (string value)
  {
    m_number = value;
  }

  public int this [int column]
  {
    get
    {
      return column < m_number.Length ? m_number [m_number.Length - column - 1] - '0' : 0;
    }
  }

  public static implicit operator Number (string rhs)
  {
    return new Number (rhs);
  }

  public static bool operator == (Number lhs, Number rhs)
  {
    return lhs.m_number == rhs.m_number;
  }

  public static bool operator != (Number lhs, Number rhs)
  {
    return lhs.m_number != rhs.m_number;
  }

  public override bool Equals (object obj)
  {
     return this == (Number) obj;
  }

  public override int GetHashCode ()
  {
    return m_number.GetHashCode ();
  }

  public static Number operator + (Number lhs, Number rhs)
  {
    StringBuilder
      result = new StringBuilder (new string ('0', lhs.m_number.Length + rhs.m_number.Length));

    int
      carry = 0;

    for (int i = 0 ; i < result.Length ; ++i)
    {
      int
        sum = carry + lhs [i] + rhs [i],
        units = sum % 10;

      carry = sum / 10;

      result [result.Length - i - 1] = (char) ('0' + units);
    }

    return TrimLeadingZeros (result);
  }

  public static Number operator * (Number lhs, Number rhs)
  {
    StringBuilder
      result = new StringBuilder (new string ('0', lhs.m_number.Length + rhs.m_number.Length));

    for (int multiplier_index = rhs.m_number.Length - 1 ; multiplier_index >= 0 ; --multiplier_index)
    {
      int
        multiplier = rhs.m_number [multiplier_index] - '0',
        column = result.Length - rhs.m_number.Length + multiplier_index;

      for (int i = lhs.m_number.Length - 1 ; i >= 0 ; --i, --column)
      {
        int
          product = (lhs.m_number [i] - '0') * multiplier,
          units = product % 10,
          tens = product / 10,
          hundreds = 0,
          unit_sum = result [column] - '0' + units;

        if (unit_sum > 9)
        {
          unit_sum -= 10;
          ++tens;
        }

        result [column] = (char) ('0' + unit_sum);

        int
          tens_sum = result [column - 1] - '0' + tens;

        if (tens_sum > 9)
        {
          tens_sum -= 10;
          ++hundreds;
        }

        result [column - 1] = (char) ('0' + tens_sum);

        if (hundreds > 0)
        {
          int
            hundreds_sum = result [column - 2] - '0' + hundreds;

          result [column - 2] = (char) ('0' + hundreds_sum);
        }
      }
    }

    return TrimLeadingZeros (result);
  }

  public override string ToString ()
  {
    return m_number;
  }

  static string TrimLeadingZeros (StringBuilder number)
  {
    while (number [0] == '0' && number.Length > 1)
    {
      number.Remove (0, 1);
    }

    return number.ToString ();
  }

  string
    m_number;
}

static void Main (string [] args)
{
  Number
    a = new Number ("1"),
    b = new Number (args [0]),
    one = new Number ("1");

  for (Number c = new Number ("1") ; c != b ; )
  {
    c = c + one;
    a = a * c;
  }

  Console.WriteLine (string.Format ("{0}! = {1}", new object [] { b, a }));
}

FWIW: 10000! is over 35500 character long.

Skizz

share

The code below is tongue in cheek, however when you consider that the return value is limited to n < 34 for uint32, <65 uint64 before we run out of space for the return value with a uint, hard coding 33 values isn't that crazy :)

public static int Factorial(int n)
{
    switch (n)
    {
    	case 1:
    		return 1;
    	case 2:
    		return 2;
    	case 3:
    		return 6;
    	case 4:
    		return 24;
    	default:
    		throw new Exception("Sorry, I can only count to 4");
    }

}
share

Lambda Calculus

Input and output are Church numerals (i.e. natural number k is \f n. f^k n; so 3 = \f n. f (f (f n)))

(\x. x x) (\y f. f (y y f)) (\y n. n (\x y z. z) (\x y. x) (\f n. f n) (\f. n (y (\f m. n (\g h. h (g f)) (\x. m) (\x. x)) f)))
share

Ruby: functional

def factorial(n)
    return 1 if n == 1
    n * factorial(n -1)
end
share

Icon

Recursive function

procedure factorial(n)
  return (0<n) * factorial(n-1) | 1
end

I've cheated a bit allowing negatives to return 1. If you want it to fail given a negative argument it's slightly less concise:

  return (0<n) * factorial(n-1) | (n=0 & 1)

Then

write(factorial(3))
write(factorial(-1))
write(factorial(20))

prints

6
2432902008176640000

Iterative generator

procedure factorials()
  local f,n
  f := 1; n := 0
  repeat suspend f *:= (n +:= 1)
end

Then

every write(factorials() \ 5)

prints

1
2
6
24
120

To understand this: evaluation is goal-directed and backtracks on failure. There is no boolean type, and binary operators which would return a boolean in other languages, either fail or return their second argument - with the exception of |, which in a single-value context returns its first argument if it succeeds, otherwise tries its second argument. (in a multiple-value context it returns its first argument then its second argument)

suspend is like yield in other languages, except that a generator is not explicitly called multiple times to return its results. Instead, every asks its argument for all values but doesn't return anything by default; it's useful with side-effects (in this case I/O).

\ limits the number of values returned by a generator, which in the case of factorials would be infinite.

share

Clojure

Tail-recursive

(defn fact 
  ([n] (fact n 1))
  ([n acc] (if (= n 0) 
               acc 
               (recur (- n 1) (* acc n)))))

Short and simple

 (defn fact [n] (apply * (range 1 (+ n 1))))
share

Nothing is as fast as bash & bc:

function fac { seq $1 | paste -sd* | bc; }  
$ fac 42
1405006117752879898543142606244511569936384000000000
$
share

Haskell

factorial n = product [1..n]
share

Mathematica : using pure recursive functions

(If[#>1,# #0[#-1],1])&
share

Lua

function factorial (n)
  if (n <= 1) then return 1 end
  return n*factorial(n-1)
end

And here is a stack overflow caught in the wild:

> print (factorial(234132))
stdin:3: stack overflow
stack traceback:
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    ...
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:3: in function 'factorial'
    stdin:1: in main chunk
    [C]: ?
share

Nemerle: Functional

def fact(n) {
    | 0 => 1
    | x => x * fact(x-1)
}
share

Agda 2: Functional, dependently typed.

data Nat = zero | suc (m::Nat)

add (m::Nat) (n::Nat) :: Nat
 = case m of
     (zero ) -> n
     (suc p) -> suc (add p n)

mul (m::Nat) (n::Nat)::Nat
   = case m of
      (zero ) -> zero
      (suc p) -> add n (mul p n)

factorial (n::Nat)::Nat 
 = case n of
    (zero ) -> suc zero
    (suc p) -> mul n (factorial p)
share
#Language: T-SQL
#Style: Recursive, divide and conquer

Just for fun - in T-SQL using a divide and conquer recursive method. Yes, recursive - in SQL without stack overflow.

create function factorial(@b int=1, @e int) returns float as begin
  return case when @b>=@e then @e else 
      convert(float,dbo.factorial(@b,convert(int,@b+(@e-@b)/2)))
    * convert(float,dbo.factorial(convert(int,@b+1+(@e-@b)/2),@e)) end
end

call it like this:

print dbo.factorial(1,170) -- the 1 being the starting number
share

Delphi

facts: array[2..12] of integer;

function TForm1.calculate(f: integer): integer;
begin
    if f = 1 then
      Result := f
    else if f > High(facts) then
      Result := High(Integer)
    else if (facts[f] > 0) then
      Result := facts[f]
    else begin
      facts[f] := f * Calculate(f-1);
      Result := facts[f];
    end;
end;

initialize

  for i := Low(facts) to High(facts) do
    facts[i] := 0;

After the first time a factorial higher or equal to the desired value has been calculated, this algorithm just returns the factorial in constant time O(1).

It takes in account that int32 only can hold up to 12!

share

PostScript: Tail Recursive

/fact0 { dup 2 lt { pop } { 2 copy mul 3 1 roll 1 sub exch pop fact0 } ifelse } def
/fact { 1 exch fact0 } def
share

Forth (recursive):

: factorial ( n -- n )
    dup 1 > if
        dup 1 - recurse *
    else
        drop 1
     then
;
share

Compile time in C++

template<unsigned i>
struct factorial
{ static const unsigned value = i * factorial<i-1>::value; };

template<>
struct factorial<0>
{ static const unsigned value = 1; };

Use in code as:

Factorial<5>::value
share

Brainfuck: with bignum support!

Accepts as input a non-negative integer followed by newline, and outputs the corresponding factorial followed by newline.

>>>>,----------[>>>>,----------]>>>>++<<<<<<<<[>++++++[<----
-->-]<-<<<<]>>>>[[>>+<<-]>>[<<+>+>-]<->+<[>>>>+<<<-<[-]]>[-]
>>]>[-<<<<<[<<<<]>>>>[[>>+<<-]>>[<<+>+>-]>>]>>>>[-[>+<-]+>>>
>]<<<<[<<<<]<<<<[<<<<]>>>>>[>>>[>>>>]>>>>[>>>>]<<<<[[>>>>+<<
<<-]<<<<]>>>>+<<<<<<<[<<<<]>>>>-[>>>[>>>>]>>>>[>>>>]<<<<[>>>
+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>+>-]<-[>>+<<[-]]<<[<<<<]>>>>[>[>+<-]>[<<+>+>
-]<<[>>>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>+>-]<->+++++++++[-<[-[>>>>+<<<<-]]>>
>>[<<<<+>>>>-]<<<]<[>>+<<<<[-]>>[<<+>>-]]>>]<<<<[<<<<]<<<[<<
<<]>>>>-]>>>>]>>>[>[-]>>>]<<<<[>>+<<-]>>[<<+>+>-]<->+<[>-<[-
]]>[-<<-<<<<[>>+<<-]>>[<<+>+>-]<->+<[>-<[-]]>]<<[<<<<]<<<<-[
>>+<<-]>>[<<+>+>-]+<[>-<[-]]>[-<<++++++++++<<<<-[>>+<<-]>>[<
<+>+>-]+<[>-<[-]]>]<<[<<<<]>>>>[[>>+<<-]>>[<<+>+>-]<->+<[>>>
>+<<<-<[-]]>[-]>>]>]>>>[>>>>]<<<<[>+++++++[<+++++++>-]<--.<<
<<]++++++++++.

Unlike the brainf*ck answer posted earlier, this does not overflow any memory locations. (That implementation put n! in a single memory location, effectively limiting it to n less than 6 under standard bf rules.) This program will output n! for any value of n, limited only by time and memory (or bf implementation). For example, using Urban Muller's compiler on my machine, it takes 12 seconds to compute 1000! I think that's pretty good, considering the program can only move left/right and increment/decrement by one.

Believe it or not, this is the first bf program I've written; it took about 10 hours, which were mostly spent debugging. Unfortunately, I later found out that Daniel B Cristofani has written a factorial generator, which just outputs ever-larger factorials, never terminating:

>++++++++++>>>+>+[>>>+[-[<<<<<[+<<<<<]>>[[-]>[<<+>+>-]<[>+<-
]<[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>+<-[>[-]>>>>+>+<
<<<<<-[>+<-]]]]]]]]]]]>[<+>-]+>>>>>]<<<<<[<<<<<]>>>>>>>[>>>>
>]++[-<<<<<]>>>>>>-]+>>>>>]<[>++<-]<<<<[<[>+<-]<<<<]>>[->[-]
++++++[<++++++++>-]>>>>]<<<<<[<[>+>+<<-]>.<<<<<]>.>>>>]

His program is much shorter, but he's practically a professional bf golfer.

share

Agda2

It is Agda2, using the very nice Agda2 syntax.

module fac where

data Nat : Set where        -- Peano numbers
  zero : Nat
  suc : Nat -> Nat
{-# BUILTIN NATURAL Nat #-}
{-# BUILTIN SUC suc #-}
{-# BUILTIN ZERO zero #-}

infixl 10 _+_               -- Addition over Peano numbers
_+_ : Nat -> Nat -> Nat
zero + n    = n
(suc n) + m = suc (n + m)

infixl 20 _*_               -- Multiplication over Peano numbers
_*_ : Nat -> Nat -> Nat
zero * n = zero
n * zero = zero
(suc n) * (suc m) = suc n + (suc n * m)

_! : Nat -> Nat             -- Factorial function, syntax: "x !"
zero ! = suc zero
(suc n) ! = (suc n) * (n !)
share

Scala

The factorial can be defined functionally as:

def fact(n: Int): BigInt = 1 to n reduceLeft(_*_)

or more traditionally as

def fact(n: Int): BigInt = if (n == 0) 1 else fact(n-1) * n

and we can make ! a valid method on Ints:

object extendBuiltins extends Application {

  class Factorizer(n: Int) {
    def ! = 1 to n reduceLeft(_*_)
  }

  implicit def int2fact(n: Int) = new Factorizer(n)

  println("10! = " + (10!))
}
share

Java Script: Creative method using "interview question" counting bits fnc.

function nu(x)
{
  var r=0
  while( x ) {
    x &= x-1
    r++
  }
  return r
}

function fac(n)
{
  var r= Math.pow(2,n-nu(n))

  for ( var i=3 ; i <= n ; i+= 2 )
    r *= Math.pow(i,Math.floor(Math.log(n/i)/Math.LN2)+1)
  return r
}

Works up to 21! then Chrome switches to scientific notation. Inspiration thanks lack of sleep and Knuth, et al's "concrete mathematics".

share

Python: functional, recursive one-liner using short circuit boolean evaluation.

    factorial = lambda n: ((n <= 1) and 1) or factorial(n-1) * n
share

Perl 6:Procedural

sub factorial ( int $n ){

  my $result = 1;

  loop ( ; $n > 0; $n-- ){

    $result *= $n;

  }

  return $result;
}
share

C:

Edit: Actually C++ I guess, because of the variable declaration in the for loop.

 int factorial(int x) {
      int product = 1;

      for (int i = x; i > 0; i--) {
           product *= i;
      }

      return product;
 }
share
1  
C99 is fine with that. –  aib Sep 18 '08 at 22:13

two of many Mathematica solutions (although ! is built-in and efficient):

(* returns pure function *)
(FixedPoint[(If[#[[2]]>1,{#[[1]]*#[[2]],#[[2]]-1},#])&,{1,n}][[1]])&

(* not using built-in, returns pure function, don't use: might build 1..n list *)
(Times @@ Range[#])&
share

Visual Basic: Linq

<Extension()> _
Public Function Product(ByVal xs As IEnumerable(Of Integer)) As Integer
    Return xs.Aggregate(1, Function(a, b) a * b)
End Function

Public Function Fact(ByVal n As Integer) As Integer
    Return Aggregate x In Enumerable.Range(1, n) Into Product()
End Function

This shows how to use the Aggregate keyword in VB. C# can't do this (although C# can of course call the extension method directly).

share

Scheme : Functional - Tail Recursive

(define (factorial n)
  (define (fac-times n acc)
    (if (= n 0)
        acc
        (fac-times (- n 1) (* acc n))))
  (if (< n 0)
      (display "Wrong argument!")
      (fac-times n 1)))
share

Language Name: ChucK

Moog moog => dac;
4.0 => moog.gain;

for (0 => int i; i < 8; i++) {
    <<< factorial(i) >>>;
}

fun int factorial(int n) {
    1 => int result;
    if (n != 0) {
        n * factorial(n - 1) => result;
    }

    Std.mtof(result % 128) => moog.freq;
    0.25::second => now;

    return result;
}

And it sounds like this. Not terribly interesting, but, hey, it's just a factorial function!

share

Simple solutions are the best:

#include <stdexcept>;

long fact(long f)
{
    static long fact [] = { 1, 1, 2, 6, 24, 120, 720, 5040, 40320, 362880, 3628800, 39916800, 479001600, 1932053504, 1278945280, 2004310016, 2004189184 };
    static long max     = sizeof(fact)/sizeof(long);

    if ((f < 0) || (f >= max))
    {   throw std::range_error("Factorial Range Error");
    }

    return fact[f];
}
share

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.