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I started programming in Common Lisp yesterday. Now I want to find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000. I came up with:

(loop for n from 1 to 1000 when 
     (or 
      (eq (mod n 5) 0)
      (eq (mod n 3) 0))
     (sum n)))

I know that the looping part works (loop for n from 1 to 1000 sum n) to sum the first 1000 numbers. I know that the ((eq (mod n 5) 0) (mod n 3) 0)) parts works. And I know that (or (eq (mod n 5) 0) (eq (mod n 3) 0)) works. So it looks like a robust program to me, but when I run it I get the error:

1=(SUM N) found where keyword expected getting LOOP clause after WHEN current LOOP context: WHEN (OR (EQ (MOD 1000 5) 0) (EQ (MOD 1000 3) 0)) 1#. [Condition of type SB-INT:SIMPLE-PROGRAM-ERROR]

I suspect something is wrong with the (sum n) after the or-statement. But I do not know why that is or how I can solve it. Can someone help me out and get my first Lisp program to work?

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2  
EQ does not work on numbers. Use =. –  Rainer Joswig May 29 at 10:44
    
@RainerJoswig (eq 5 5) returns T. Ah and (= 5 5) does too. Is = the more appropriate equality operator in this case? –  user2609980 May 29 at 10:47
2  
Great if (EQ 5 5) returns true for you. In the general case EQ of the same number value maybe NIL. See the documentation. If you want to compare numbers use = or EQL. –  Rainer Joswig May 29 at 10:56
1  
Also, as a general note, and a microoptimization; (zerop (mod n 3)) will be true more often than (zerop (mod n 5)), since every third number is divisible by 3, whereas only every fifth number is divisible by 5. Thus (or (… (mod n 3)) (… (mod n 5))) could be slightly faster. –  Joshua Taylor May 29 at 11:11
    
While using 'sum' I am getting message as," LOOP: missing forms after DO: permitted by CLtL2, forbidden by ANSI CL." So, I tried in this fashion, (reduce #'+ (let ((n nil))(loop for i from 0 to 100 finally (return n) if (and (zerop (rem i 5)) (zerop (rem i 3))) do (setf n (cons i n))))) –  Rorschach May 29 at 11:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

sum n, not (sum n)

Don't put sum n in parentheses. The loop macro is its own domain specific language with its own grammar. With it, you'd (loop for ... sum n). The grammar is given in HyperSpec entry on loop in this production:

numeric-accumulation::= {count | counting | sum | summing | } 
                         maximize | maximizing | minimize | minimizing {form | it} 
                        [into simple-var] [type-spec] 

If it sounds any better to, you can also write (loop for … summing n). That might read more like a natural English sentence.

=, eql, or zerop, but not eq

It's good practice to get into looking up functions, macros, etc., in the HyperSpec. As Rainer Joswig points out, you shouldn't use eq for comparing numbers. Why? Let's look it up in the HyperSpec. The examples include:

(eq 3 3)
=>  true
OR=>  false
 (eq 3 3.0) =>  false
 (eq 3.0 3.0)
=>  true
OR=>  false
 (eq #c(3 -4) #c(3 -4))
=>  true
OR=>  false

and the Notes section says (emphasis added):

Objects that appear the same when printed are not necessarily eq to each other. Symbols that print the same usually are eq to each other because of the use of the intern function. However, numbers with the same value need not be eq, and two similar lists are usually not identical.

An implementation is permitted to make "copies" of characters and numbers at any time. The effect is that Common Lisp makes no guarantee that eq is true even when both its arguments are "the same thing" if that thing is a character or number.

For numbers you need something else. = is a good general numeric comparison, although it does more work here than what you need, because it can compare numbers of different types. E.g., (= 5 5.0) is true. Since you're only concerned about 0, you could use zerop, but that will still do a bit more work than you need, since it will check other numeric types as well. E.g., (zerop #c(0.0 0.0)) is true. In this case, since (mod n …) will be giving you an integer, you can use eql:

The value of eql is true of two objects, x and y, in the folowing cases:

  1. If x and y are eq.
  2. If x and y are both numbers of the same type and the same value.
  3. If they are both characters that represent the same character.

Thus, you can use (or (eql (mod n 3) 0) (eql (mod n 5) 0)).

Other ways of doing this

Now, your question was about a particular piece of loop syntax, and there were some points to be made about equality operators. However, since some of the other answers have looked at other ways to do this, I think it's worth pointing out that there are much more efficient ways to do this. First, let's look at a way to sum up all the multiples of some number beneath a given limit. E.g., for the number 3 and the inclusive limit 26, we have the sum

?
= 3 + 6 + 9 + 12 + 15 + 18 + 21 + 24
= (3 + 24) + (6 + 21) + (9 + 18) + (12 + 15)
= 27 + 27 + 27 + 27

In general, if you try with a few different numbers, you can work out that for an inclusive limit l and a number n, you'll be adding up pairs of numbers, with an optional half pair if there's a odd number of multiples of n that are less than l. I'm not going to work out the whole derivation, but you can end up with

(defun sum-of-multiples-below-inclusive (limit divisor)
  (multiple-value-bind (quotient remainder) 
      (floor limit divisor)
    (let ((pair (+ (- limit remainder) divisor)))
      (multiple-value-bind (npairs half-pair)
          (floor quotient 2)
        (+ (* npairs pair)
           (if (oddp half-pair)
               (floor pair 2)
               0))))))

Then, to find out the sum of the number of multiples less than a given number, you can just substract one from limit:

(defun sum-of-multiples-below (limit divisor)
  (sum-of-multiples-below (1- limit) divisor))

Then, to expand to your case, where there are multiple divisors, you'll need to add some of these numbers, and then subtract out the ones that are getting counted twice. E.g., in your case:

(+ (sum-of-multiples-below 1000 3)
   (sum-of-multiples-below 1000 5)
   (- (sum-of-multiples-below 1000 15)))
;=> 233168


(loop for i from 1 below 1000 
   when (or (eql 0 (mod i 3))
            (eql 0 (mod i 5)))
   sum i)
;=> 233168

Now, using time naively can lead to misleading results, but SBCL compiles forms before it evaluates them, so this isn't too terrible. This is a very, very, small micro-benchmark, but take a look at the number of cycles used in each form:

(time (+ (sum-of-multiples-below 1000 3)
         (sum-of-multiples-below 1000 5)
         (- (sum-of-multiples-below 1000 15))))
Evaluation took:
  0.000 seconds of real time
  0.000000 seconds of total run time (0.000000 user, 0.000000 system)
  100.00% CPU
  11,327 processor cycles
  0 bytes consed
(time (loop for i from 1 below 1000 
         when (or (eql 0 (mod i 3))
                  (eql 0 (mod i 5)))
         sum i))

Evaluation took:
  0.000 seconds of real time
  0.000000 seconds of total run time (0.000000 user, 0.000000 system)
  100.00% CPU
  183,843 processor cycles
  0 bytes consed

Using the closed form is much faster. The different is more pronounced if we use a higher limit. Let's look at 100,000:

(time (+ (sum-of-multiples-below 100000 3)
         (sum-of-multiples-below 100000 5)
         (- (sum-of-multiples-below 100000 15))))
Evaluation took:
  0.000 seconds of real time
  0.000000 seconds of total run time (0.000000 user, 0.000000 system)
  100.00% CPU
  13,378 processor cycles
  0 bytes consed
(time (loop for i from 1 below 100000
         when (or (eql 0 (mod i 3))
                  (eql 0 (mod i 5)))
         sum i))

Evaluation took:
  0.007 seconds of real time
  0.004000 seconds of total run time (0.004000 user, 0.000000 system)
  57.14% CPU
  18,641,205 processor cycles
  0 bytes consed

For 10,000,000 the numbers are even more staggering:

(time (+ (sum-of-multiples-below 10000000 3)
         (sum-of-multiples-below 10000000 5)
         (- (sum-of-multiples-below 10000000 15))))
Evaluation took:
  0.000 seconds of real time
  0.000000 seconds of total run time (0.000000 user, 0.000000 system)
  100.00% CPU
  13,797 processor cycles
  0 bytes consed
(time (loop for i from 1 below 10000000
         when (or (eql 0 (mod i 3))
                  (eql 0 (mod i 5)))
         sum i))

Evaluation took:
  0.712 seconds of real time
  0.712044 seconds of total run time (0.712044 user, 0.000000 system)
  100.00% CPU
  1,916,513,379 processor cycles
  0 bytes consed

Some of these Project Euler problems are pretty interesting. Some of them have some pretty straightforward naïve solutions that work for small inputs, but don't scale well at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! (loop for n from 1 to 1000 when (or (= (mod n 5) 0) (= (mod n 3) 0)) sum n) returns T. Not an integer? –  user2609980 May 29 at 10:59
    
Umm, not, (loop for n from 1 to 1000 when (or (= (mod n 5) 0) (= (mod n 3) 0)) sum n) ;=> 234168. Is there some code that you're not showing us. –  Joshua Taylor May 29 at 11:02
    
Well I wrote it in a file and then do (load "myfile.lisp"). Which returns T. I think I need to execute the file. :) –  user2609980 May 29 at 11:03
    
Again, look up the functions in the HyperSpec. For load, it says, "If the file named by filespec is successfully loaded, load returns true." –  Joshua Taylor May 29 at 11:08
    
Thanks Joshua for your explanation! :) –  user2609980 May 29 at 11:45

I would format the code like this:

(loop for n from 1 below 1000
      when (or (zerop (mod n 3))
               (zerop (mod n 5)))
      sum n))
  • one line less
  • when at the start of a line
  • no need to have or alone on a line
  • clauses in LOOP don't have parentheses
  • use below

This kind of Loop macro goes back to the early 70s to Interlisp, long before Common Lisp existed.

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Here is a another solution without loop

(defun sum-to-thousand (count result)
       (cond ((> count 1000) result)
         ((= (mod count 3) 0) (sum-to-thousand (+ count 1) (+ count result)))
         ((= (mod count 5) 0) (sum-to-thousand (+ count 1) (+ count result)))
         (t (sum-to-thousand (+ count 1) result))))
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1  
Also note that Common Lisp is not requiring an implementation to support tail call optimization. –  Rainer Joswig May 29 at 14:54
    
I know it's not answering the question about the compile error that has already been done by Joshua. I just thought it would be beneficial to others reading the question in the future to see a recrusive way of solving this. I'm currently learning scheme and understanding recursion has been a big part of my learning. –  Rptx May 29 at 18:11

May I propose more "lispier" variant:

CL-USER> (defun my-sum (&key (from 1) to dividers (sum 0))
           (if (>= from to)
               sum
               (my-sum :from (1+ from)
                       :to to
                       :dividers dividers
                       :sum (if (some (lambda (x) (zerop (mod from x))) dividers)
                                (+ sum from)
                                sum))))
MY-SUM
CL-USER> (my-sum :to 1000 :dividers '(3 5))
233168
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