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The thing I hate most in CSS3 is that there is always two properties you should put to do one effect. I think this is not professional, and increase the CSS size. For example, why don't they unite -webkit-border-radius and -moz-border-radius in border-radius

Imagine if we have 10 browsers, will we write 10 lines to do a rounded corner effect? Anyone can explain?

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up vote 29 down vote accepted

It's because they're vendor-specific. -webkit- and -moz- -prefixed properties are not standard properties. That "namespacing" allows vendors to test new cool features, and if they're great, they can be incorporated into the standards. This is what is happening with CSS3: Mozilla and the Webkit team tried cool things, and now they're going to become standard. It's just not done yet. Eventually it'll become a consistent border-radius property.

It's a clear way to indicate that something is not expected to work on all browsers. For instance, -webkit-transition-property only works on Webkit-based browsers.

Anyways, -webkit-border-radius and -moz-border-radius don't exactly work the same. It's because each vendor, even though they're doing similar things, are allowed to implement features the way they want. The standard will establish a standard way, but everyone is free to do whatever they want within their own namespace.

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But I believe, They both can build their engines to parse the "border-radius" just like what they did to parse "-webkit-" or "-moz-" specify tag. Engines can ignore tags or attributes in it, if they are not willing to handle it. Still I believe there is some specific reason for using "-webkit-" or "-moz-" with tags. – Kumaresan Jul 23 '12 at 3:02
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@Kumaresan, vendors cannot build their engines to accept non-standard syntax to standard properties. Standard properties must accept only one same syntax across all browsers and they must be no more permissive than that. CSS should work absolutely equally in all browsers: if some syntax worked in one browser but not in another, then it wouldn't be standard. – zneak Jul 23 '12 at 14:46
    
But it's NOT standard! Which is why they're jumping through all these hoops, needlessly. Since it's not standard, just use the non-standard-standard tag, and then if/when it becomes standard... BOOM: We're good to go! Developers should be aware which properties are supported and which aren't without needing -ugly-specific-prefixes – Volte Mar 15 '13 at 2:20
    
@Volte, this won't work unless there's already a consensus over the syntax. Gradients had a horribly different syntax for several years, for instance. For a more up-to-date example, animation properties don't work in WebKit without the prefix, even though Firefox supports it, and in cases like that you have to "jump through all these hoops" if you want it to work on Webkit-based browsers. It may seem silly with border-radius if you weren't here to experience it three years ago, and the CSS landscape has evolved a lot, but the most bleeding-edge properties still need prefixes. – zneak Mar 15 '13 at 5:15
    
I guess I see your point. Hmm... That's frustrating, but I suppose that's what Standards Committees are for! It'd be nice if, when the three big boys (Safari, Chrome, Firefox) have similar ideas, and push them to W3C, they'd act on them a little faster than oh... say... 3 years? – Volte Mar 15 '13 at 20:07

-webkit-border-radius and -moz-border-radius were created before the CSS3 borders standard was a complete (it is still not an approved standard - it is currently a Candidate Recommendation).

The standard calls for a border-radius only, as you can see from the specification.

They are specific to mozilla and webkit - once the standard is approved this should change to be border-radius on all supporting browsers.

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Hi. At the time it will become a standard , will the prefix still be supported?(p.s. my congrats for ♦) – Royi Namir Mar 6 '13 at 15:37
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@RoyiNamir - As far as I know, vendor prefixes will remain supported, but at that time, not really needed anymore. And thanks... the diamond comes with the job ;) – Oded Mar 6 '13 at 15:45

protected by Marty Jun 5 '13 at 3:35

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